Home Buyer, Home Buyer in New Jersey

Recommendation on home and pool inspector

Asked by Home Buyer, New Jersey Tue Jul 7, 2009

Anyone have recommendations for a good home and pool inspector in central NJ? Any feedback for H&J Freile or All Star Home Inspection?

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Answers

22
Hi there home buyer, many of my clients are using Garden State Home Inspectors, owner and operator is David Haigh, office number 1-888-775-1414, website http://www.GSInspectors.com

I'm sure David could provide a good pool inspector.

Tell him Jeannie Feenick sent you.

Good luck,
Jeannie Feenick
"Unwavering Commitment to Service"
Search the MLS at http://www.feenick.com
Web Reference: http://www.feenick.com
4 votes Thank Flag Link Thu Jul 9, 2009
Hello Home Buyer,

As a Professional Property Inspector I certainly have to agree with Francesca and Ines. Not sure about your area but here in Texas most Inspectors charge extra for a pool inspection. Most, if not all times, the extra the Inspector charges to inspect the pool is the same as a professional pool company would charge to inspect the pool. Pool companies here will also, many times, credit an annual maintenance contract for the cost of the pool inspection as well if they do the inspection.

Pools can be very complex and, as Francesca points out, very expensive systems. There are so many variations that even professional pool companies sometimes, but not often, run into issues identifying problems with them. The good pool companies are constantly keeping abreast of pools, new developments in pools, etc. Since that is all they do, day in and day out, THEY KNOW POOLS! There are some Inspectors who can inspect these well with many years background in installing, repairing and maintaining them. Those Inspectors are few and far between. Some aspects of pools all Inspectors should be capable of inspecting but not all aspects. We, Inspectors, must keep abreast of so many different things that pools should be left to the true experts to fully inspect.

Which would you rather pay for, an Inspector's extra pool inspection fee or a professional pool companies inspection fee?

Emmanuel J. Scanlan
PS Inspection & Property Services LLC http://www.psinspection.com
214-418-4366 (cell)
TREC License # 7593
International Code Council, Residential Combination Inspector #5247015-R5 (Electrical, Mechanical, Plumbing and Building)
Certified Infrared Thermographer (ASNT-TC1A Standards)
Texas Residential Construction Commission, Third Party Warranty Inspector #1593
Texas Residential Construction Commission, Inspector, County Inspection Program
Texas Department Of Insurance, VIP Inspector # 08507061016
Hayman Residential Engineering Services, Field Technician
CMC Energy - Certified Energy Auditor

Knowledge is power, but sharing knowledge brings peace!!
Web Reference: http://www.psinspection.com
3 votes Thank Flag Link Fri Jul 10, 2009
Home Buyer -

As usual, Mary hits the nail on the head.


Pay to have the pool opened. A pool company usually charges about $250.00 to open the pool.
What is good about having a pool company open the pool for you is that the company usually sends knowledgeable people to open and they should be able to spot issues immediately with the filter, hoses and such.. as far as leaking and the liner... well, you have to fill the pool up and then mark and watch it, If the water is lower the next day, guess what.. Probably a leak. if not.. Probably not. Aside from a hole in the pool creating a leak, the liner where it meets the pool edge is where to look for any signs of wear. Again, the whole $50k thing... highly unusual, rare and unlikely.

As far as credits, you should get them figured out BEFORE you go to the closing table and yes, I have seen many deals fall apart because of buyers making very unreasonable demands for credits. If there is a legitimate problem, 90% of sellers will address the issues and credit the buyer or repairs.
2 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Jul 15, 2009
More questions:

DId you find out if they have a pool service you can speak to and/or get records of previous maintenance, repairs, replacement parts, age etc.? This is the easiest way to get a good beginning point for how well the owners kept up the pool.

Did the sellers make any representations, on a disclosure or during attorney review through their lawyer, about the pool condition since it is not open? Did they say it was being sold "as is"? Even then speaking to the pool company is a good way to know how it was maintained previously.

If you find it hasn't been opened/maintained in a while, I would probably get the pool opened up to be inspected. But bear in mind that when opened, it has to be filled and the mechanical componants must be serviced before being started up. IMHO, a pool is a non-essential item, however, it IS a major addition to a home and if something is not right could cause potential problems in the future. Thus anything wrong should be addressed by the seller (unless, as I stated before, they made some representation that the pool is sold as is etc).

Pools are a terrific addition to a home, require little effort once up and running and provide a wealth of benefits (I have one and love it). Yearly opening and closing (and the associated costs), a supply of chemicals, and a half hour a day to empty skimmers, or backwash the pool once a week are usually all that is required if in good shape.

When maintained properly, they only occasionally incur high cost repairs (like replacing liners, filters etc....same as replacing an old furnace or water heater inside a home...but at least in my opinion, you should have it inspected to know where you are from the beginning.

As for deals falling through because of sellers not giving a credit or repairing reasonable requests there is no pat answer. Talk to your attorney about what the most important inspection issues are regarding the house itself first and let him/her help you make a decision based on the inspection what you should ask the seller to address. I am sure other agents will agree with me that sellers have continually surprised us at what they will and will not repair/credit.
2 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Jul 15, 2009
Home buyer,

If it is a built in pool, most likely the current homeowner has a pool company service the pool at opening and closing. (they service the filter, skimmers, heater if any etc). Ask the homeowner who they use, and let that company, who has intimate knowledge of the pool in question, give you their opinion on the pools condition, what repairs or upgrades they have done on the pool etc., OR have that company recommend a pool inspector.

I use PM pools to service my inground pool. They are very good. Their info is:

PM Swimming Pool Service
360 West 1st Avenue
Roselle, NJ 07203

(908) 241-6000 – Main Number
(908) 241-6002 – Fax Number
(866) 8PM POOL – Toll Free
(866) (876 7665
Web Reference: http://www.pmpools.com/
2 votes Thank Flag Link Sat Jul 11, 2009
H&J Freile inspectors are horrible! They make up information when they don't know the answer. I received a report for water damage and there were no pipes or water sources above that part of the ceiling, it turned out to be an old light fixture... Nothing to do with water! They also write in their reviews "undetermined cause for problems, a deeper investigation is recommended" - Let me translate... if you pay us more we will actually look for the problem.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Mon Oct 17, 2011
H&J Freile inspectors in NJ are horrible! They make up information when they don't know the answer. I received a report for water damage and there were no pipes or water sources above that part of the ceiling, it turned out to be an old light fixture... Nothing to do with water! They also write in their reviews "undetermined cause for problems, a deeper investigation is recommended" - Let me translate... if you pay us more we will actually look for the problem.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Mon Oct 17, 2011
Thanks for all of your recommendations and advice! If the pool is currently closed should I pay to open it and then pay to have someone inspect it? it's been closed the whole winter and summer. does this mean it's in bad shape? if the inspector finds something faulty with the lining, etc. realistically is this something that sellers are usually willing to credit/pay for or are pools considered more as non-essential (i.e. like carpeting or flooring) and not within reason ...?

Have you ever had deals fall through because the seller wasnt willing to credit the buyer for repairs requested that were within reason (aside from the usual termite, radon, etc)?
1 vote Thank Flag Link Tue Jul 14, 2009
Social Media Among Policy Changes
At their meeting Saturday, the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS® Board of Directors affirmed REALTORS® obligation under the Code of Ethics to refrain from making false or misleading statements about competitors and their companies—including passing a new Standard of Practice that compels REALTOR® to remove or clarify misleading comments posted on their blogs.

4 Professional Standards Changes

1.) Members have obligation to correct misleading statements. Standard of Practice 15-2 was amended and a new Standard of Practice was approved to strengthen members’ obligations to refrain from making false or misleading statements about competitors, including in the use of social media tools.

The new amendment includes the duty “to publish a clarification about or to remove statements made by others on electronic media the REALTOR® controls once the REALTOR® knows the statement is false or misleading.”

Translation? Say you publish a blog and someone else posts a false or misleading comment about a fellow REALTOR® on the blog. When you become aware of it, under this new standard, it’s your duty to remove the post or publish a clarification.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Mon Jul 13, 2009
Homebuyer,

Unfortunately here on Trulia there are certain responders who make it a point to oppose the responses of others on a regular basis in an effort to discredit their input - makes me wonder how much time they actually spend servicing the consumer.

The $50K story is REAL and acknowledged by a licensed home inspector. In this instance the pool needed to be entirely replaced and was surrounded by expensive stamped concrete that had to be destroyed (then replaced) in order to replace the pool; hence the cost involved not only the replacement of the pool, but the materials surrounding the pool.

The point here is that well trained home inspectors check basic operations and most often are not able to detect pipes that were clogged with landscape debris that came to fruition after the deal closes. As acknowledge the the home inspector who responded here and my client's contractor who repaired the situation, this was not something that would have been detected with a home inspection.

Love and Peace,
Francesca, Realtor, ePro
Web Reference: http://www.PatrizioRE.com
1 vote Thank Flag Link Sun Jul 12, 2009
Home Buyer,

Get a local pool company to come in and do an inspection.
I have not seen the type of pool disrepair that some have mentioned here. Very rare.

One time, a client was buying a foreclosure and the pool liner sepereated form the wall... and we knew it was a 3k fix going in ( New Liner). How do I know this? I have an in ground pool myself.. and for all the talk about how much work they are and so on.. it is not all that much to maintain.

All and all Inground pool owners are usually very meticulous when it comes to maintenance and usually do not let these things go. You will find probably the worst cases with foreclosures and short sales where the people have given up. You may even have a situation where an older couple has not opened the pool in years.. still, it is not usually a case where you need 50k to repair.

When it comes down to it, this is a hole in the ground that circulates water.. the mechanics behind it and maintaining it are not very complicated, but you do have to learn how the system works and how to maintain it.. after that.. Don't get all nervous with the 50k in damage story, plumbing issue story, usually things are o.k.


Call Leslie Pools and ask if they do pool inspections..
1 vote Thank Flag Link Sat Jul 11, 2009
Home buyer,

You've rec'd some excellent referrals on home inspectors. I would inquire as to their ability to inspect the "pool" and what exactly they inspect. To my knowledge, most inspections are superficial and don't necesarilly look beyond the surface,

Two cases in point.

(1) My brother purchased a home in East Hanover with a built-in pool. The homeowner indicated no deficincies and the inspector found none. When they opened the pool for business, they found it profusing leaking; later learned from neighbors that the previous homeowner rectified this situation by using a fireman's hose to redirect the water to the street. This lead to the discovery of a failed below pool liner that required not only replacement of the entire pool, but the stamped concrete that surrounded the pool. They were left with an unepxected $50k expense with no recourse against the seller since they had the pool inspected.

(2) A client recently called me to let me know that some serious plumbing issues had arisen with the home they purchased in Dec, 2008. Fortunately, there were told by their current contractor that this issue could not have been detected by a basic home inspection.

In conclusion, home inspectors are valuable, but may not cover all you may wish.

Love and Peace,
Francesca, Realtor, ePro
Francesca@PatrizioRE.com
Web Reference: http://www.PatrizioRE.com
1 vote Thank Flag Link Fri Jul 10, 2009
I reccomend 3 inspectors to my clients... They need to be the best overall to get my referral.

1) Robert Hahn - Family Building Inspectiors.
http://www.familybuildinginspectors.com/

2) Jay Tauber - Jersy Building inspections... ( also a local builder ) Jay knows houses.
http://jerseybuildinginspection.com/
1 vote Thank Flag Link Wed Jul 8, 2009
Dear Home Buyer,
I use Clear Blue Pool Inspections 609- 923-0745. Their website is http://www.clearbluepoolinspections.com. I just had them do an inspection on a pool in S.Jersey but give him a call he is great. Take care and good luck.
Web Reference: http://www.inesdelacruz.com
1 vote Thank Flag Link Tue Jul 7, 2009
Wade Ashby is a good inspector. Very thorough and
he even prints up a book on all the things he finds in your home
or pool.

Call me and I will look up his phone number. He works the Salt Lake City
area.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Tue Jul 7, 2009
Hi,

See link below I have heard good things about him.
http://allinonehomeinspection.com/welcome/welcome-2.html

I'm a Direct Lender Mortgage Banker I have an office in NJ.
Feel free to call me for your financial needs.

Good Luck,
David
845-323-0466
1 vote Thank Flag Link Tue Jul 7, 2009
H&J Friele is good so is HouseMaster. I also like Dan from Freshstart Home Inspections out of Branchburg.

Camille Miller
Broker/Owner
JustJerseyRealEstate.com
1 vote Thank Flag Link Tue Jul 7, 2009
You shouldn't have any concerns as long as you've had some good pool repair done. Even if you don't think anythings broken, it's never a bad idea to have someone come and check it out. That way when the pool inspector comes, you'll be worry free. http://www.amcopoolservice.com/poolservice.html
0 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Aug 6, 2014
CARLO VITALE of VITALE HOME INSPECTIONS.. Carlo is an ASHI Certified Home Inspector and the only one I use ....Ever.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Feb 12, 2014
Atlantic Leak Detection in Central New Jersy does a very thorough pool inspection which includes a comprehensive written report. Prices are very competitive and they are CPI's (Certified Pool Inspectors). You can check them online http://www.AtlanticLeak.com
0 votes Thank Flag Link Thu Jan 9, 2014
Aquatic Pool Inspections they did my pool inspection few years ago. bought a home in Franklin Lakes ,NJ and they were great i would definitely recommend if your buying a home with a pool to call these guys they work on high end pools mostly.

1-800-658-1027
201-891-5242
Web Reference: http://apoolinspection.com
0 votes Thank Flag Link Thu Nov 17, 2011
Did you have the pool inspected?



Home Buyer,

Get a local pool company to come in and do an inspection.
I have not seen the type of pool disrepair that some have mentioned here. Very rare.

One time, a client was buying a foreclosure and the pool liner sepereated form the wall... and we knew it was a 3k fix going in ( New Liner). How do I know this? I have an in ground pool myself.. and for all the talk about how much work they are and so on.. it is not all that much to maintain.

All and all Inground pool owners are usually very meticulous when it comes to maintenance and usually do not let these things go. You will find probably the worst cases with foreclosures and short sales where the people have given up. You may even have a situation where an older couple has not opened the pool in years.. still, it is not usually a case where you need 50k to repair.

When it comes down to it, this is a hole in the ground that circulates water.. the mechanics behind it and maintaining it are not very complicated, but you do have to learn how the system works and how to maintain it.. after that.. Don't get all nervous with the 50k in damage story, plumbing issue story, usually things are o.k.


Call Leslie Pools and ask if they do pool inspections..
0 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Jul 20, 2009
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