Home Buying in 22066>Question Details

Househunting, Home Buyer in Centreville, VA

Real Estate Agent as facilitator?

Asked by Househunting, Centreville, VA Sat Jul 10, 2010

This is an interesting article, and seems to suit my style perfectly.

http://www.trulia.com/blog/gracemorioka/2009/04/want_somethi…

Are there any agents willing to work with me as a facilitator?
If so, email me at RCustom12@GMX.com

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Answers

9
Mack McCoy’s answer
The real problem, as I see it, is that the consumer of limited-services usually doesn't know what they don't know - but the brokerage is still completely responsible and liable.

As a very practical matter, I think that if you know as much or more than I do, then you don't need me at all; if you don't, then you don't just need me a little bit.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Sat Jul 10, 2010
- I'd like to have a way to vet that out in a home buying situation.

The consensus may not provide the best answer for your particular circumstance.

- There are serious limitations to this "buyer agency model" which are difficult for a lot of people to admit and even more difficult to discuss publicly.

Such as?
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sun Jul 11, 2010
One more thing: sometimes, limited service brokerage is called fee for service brokerage.

Please remember that, as Realtors, our knowledge, like that of , for example, accountants, is our stock in trade. When you ask for second opinions, be prepared to sign agreements ( required in real estate by both law and regulation ), and pay for them. After all, you would have to pay a dentist for a second opinion, too.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sun Jul 11, 2010
In this case, I think you are talking about limited service brokerage.

All contracts are negotiable, and can have non-exclusivity written in to them. Don't be surprised if you have to carry around a copy of this signed contract to show other agents when you ask them questions!

I think that a useful step you can take would be to contact the Northerrn Virginia Association of Realtors about limited service brokerage. This is a specialty recognized by law and regulation in Virginia. They should be able to give you names of some of these specialists.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sun Jul 11, 2010
Ok, well my last question about a second opinion was a hypothetical. I should have said, "when I had a buyer's agent." My effort to be expeditious in my writing is confusing those answering my latest question about looking for a facilitator. If you emailed me about consulting, you are not stepping on anyone's toes because, while I have used an agent in the past, I do not have one currently. My last agent who I did trust and who was highly qualified has retired and moved to Florida.

I put this question up as a hypothetical because yes, I trusted him, yes he was qualified, but as all of you know, two trusted and qualified people can have different opinions. I'd like to have a way to vet that out in a home buying situation. There are serious limitations to this "buyer agency model" which are difficult for a lot of people to admit and even more difficult to discuss publicly.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sun Jul 11, 2010
What you are reading in this blog is defined in two different ways. A limited service model and/or a fee for service model. From your previous question on this forum you indicated that you are already in an agency relationship with a "highly qualified" buyers agent. Until that agency relationship expires or is terminated any other Realtor® no matter what model of service they use can not interfere with your current buyer agency agreement.

You may want to research on the web the variety of companies that do provide limited service and/or buyer rebates for clients who want to do the majority of the work themselves. They exist in our area.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sun Jul 11, 2010
Real-estate agents are already facilitators (ie they represent the buyer/seller) whenever they're involved in a deal.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sat Jul 10, 2010
Quantifying ones time, knowledge and expertise In any field is the tricky part. The concept of this article could apply well to doctors, lawyers, IT and teachers. I'd love to handle some of my medical diagnosis and the doctor chime in when I need him/her. It's a great concept until something goes wrong. Maybe if an agreed price would be paid upfront as a downpayment and the other half after a designated time frame, irregardless if a house is bought or sold? Like a lawyer, you still pay up whether you win or lose.. I don't know of too many occupations where you can spend so much time, gas money, marketing money, time away from family UPFRONT and possibly not get paid. Do you? So, If there are agents out there that could make a living on this and work less then 60 hours a week- let me know. I do wish you well. Keep me posted, i would like to know how it goes! Have a good evening!
Web Reference: http://Novanida.com
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sat Jul 10, 2010
Househunting,
What the blog describes isn't much different from what many agents do. Forget the phrasing, "facilitator" interview agents and discuss what services they are willing to provide, what their experience is and why you should chose them over the competition.
If you are looking to "drive the bus" as the blog indicates, make sure you choose someone willing to let you do this, but remember Agents have a responsibility to advise you when you are making what they may believe is a bad decision. Some will more than others based on thier knowledge and experience. That's why you should interview a few and decide who is a good fit for your expectations and experience.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sat Jul 10, 2010
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