Home Buying in Apple Valley>Question Details

Becca Johnson, Home Buyer in 92345

Is there any reason I could not move a moble home to a different location 10 or 15 miles away on my own property. I like the home on Waalew Rd. #159

Asked by Becca Johnson, 92345 Thu Sep 6, 2012

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15
Caraway, I've flagged both of your very derogatory and offensive comments as inappropriate. What you are touting on this open forum to hundreds of thousands of very proud Factory Built homeowners who have put tens of thousands of dollars or perhaps even hundreds of thousands of dollars is very demeaning and insulting to say the least.

This forum is intended to help folks who are asking questions and looking for honest and realistic solutions for matters involving one of the most important life and financial decisions they may ever make.

Your trite and inane comments are a gross mis-representation of facts about a very viable and realistic housing choice and an attack on those folks that have made that choice. It's also one of the most conspicuous and obvious forms of self aggrandizement and self promotion I've ever seen.

Your continued bashing of the Factory Built Housing industry will backfire on you and cost you business on this forum not earn you business. As an AIA affiliated architect you should be ashamed of yourself.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Fri Nov 30, 2012
Once again, however, you really need to do some due diligence regarding moving an existing MH from its current situs. Banks won't fund a conventional FHA guaranteed loan and many building jurisdictions won't allow transplants on homes older than 10 years. Check, check, check and then do some more checking.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Nov 28, 2012
Darrell,
Here, in the High Desert, a MH can be picked up for $10-25K and moved for $3-5K.
As you're operating near SF, you are accustomed to much higher prices. Chances are, that the permitting fees, septic, and water meter will cost Mr. Johnson as much as he pays for the MH.
That's just the reality here, and I suspect that Mr. Johnson wouldn't be considering the MH if he was looking to spend more money.
In fact, there are still "fixers" that can be had in the mid-80's here. A stick built house in Hesperia will have close to $35K in permits and for the water meter, that's before any earth is moved. $75/sf is an average price, and $150/sf will get you a McMansion on several acres.
You may have put more into your Spitfire than Mr. Johnson was thinking about putting into this MH purchase.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Nov 28, 2012
I can be right sometimes.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Nov 28, 2012
I'm neither a MH cheerleader nor a detractor.

Like all life situations, you'll have to look at your available funds, the long term investment factor, and the short-term deadlines for certain code changes--once again, check with the "authority having jurisdiction" (AHJ) and see what their criteria are AND ask if there are any upcoming code changes or zoning changes that would affect their decision. Some will be proactive, and some AHJ's will not, and sometimes, being human, we forget that certain changes are coming up.

In CA, the assembly and Gov. Brown just instituted a tax on lumber and sheet goods, and the citizens just decided to increase sales taxes, so that will add to your cost if you build a conventional house, and many AHJ's require fire sprinklers, also.
We may see MH's required to have dual water systems in the future to be hooked up in CA. Just a prediction, nothing certain as of this time.
So, now might be a great time, cost-wise to move a MH, but you will likely still have the same school and park costs to pay as if you built a house, so you'll still need several thousand dollars to put the home down and hook up to municipal utilities.
If you're far enough out in the county, there are only two inspectors for all of SB county, so it's possible that you could "bootleg" your MH and it might be years before anyone officially noticed it, unless your neighbors reported you to Code Enforcement. I'm not suggesting you do so, but civil disobedience is always an option.

Anecdotal: I have relatives who've bought MH's in the state of WA, and they have been quite comfortable. If you're up in the Victor Valley, I recommend avoiding Palm Harbor brand out of Texas from my own personal experience.
As I said, the above paragraph is anecdotal.

As, before, you'll have to look at all your options and then decide what you can do, and then decide what you want to do.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Nov 27, 2012
Darrell, I must give you a big thumbs down for your reckless assessment of a very good industry. You seem to paint an entire industry with a very broad brush. Obviously your remarks are quite patronizing inasmuch as you're a hungry architect pining for a deal.

Roger, please don't fall victim to the ramblings in Darrell Caraways diatribe. Having been in this very viable industry for the past 3 decades and having worked with many very fine architects, engineers and building planners I can personally attest to the fact that everything that Caraway has stated is absolutely incorrect if you go about it the right way.

By law a Manufactured Home can be placed on a privately owned parcel the same way that any other site built home can if there are no pre existing CC&Rs prohibiting them. So you can remove that argument off the table

Drive through just about any rural, semi rural or un regulated community anywhere in the Country and you will see thousands perhaps even millions of very nicely designed Manufactured and Modular homes in all shapes and sizes.

Here's a few links that just may change your perspective about Manufactured/Modular homes. If these examples are considered to be not real homes then I'd like to see what Darrell considers real. You can google modern manufactured homes and get a whole lot more info about whats going on in the Factory Built housing arena.

http://www.google.com/search?q=modern+manufactured+homes&…

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4TBwg_jeZLA&noredirect=1
http://www.no1dealer.com

I defy Darrell to find fault with these very creative examples of architectural genius.

Now all that stated there are a few provisos and for this I will give Darrell the benefit of the doubt. If the home is a PRE HUD home (built before June 15, 1976) you would not be permitted to place it anywhere but on a working ranch, farm, large nursery, temporary construction site, etc.

In fact most building municipalities and jurisdictions will not permit a home that doesn't meet certain insulation, fire sprinklers and misc building materials. This is why you need to start with your local building department and find out exactly what the parameters are before you ever commit to purchase a MH.

"Not permitted to be in locations other than parks." Nothing could be farther from the truth. Darrell needs to do his homework before he openly makes these grossly misrepresented accusations on a public forum like Trulia.

If you follow all the required and necessary building and zoning ordinances and code requirements, pull all required permits and call for all required inspections and have the home signed off and approved you will never have to worry about

Darrell you take on FEMA trailers falls far short of any form of common sense. I've been a disaster response contractor and manufactured home dealer in many disasters i.e. earthquakes, fires, floods, tornadoes and even Florida hurricanes. Were it not for the "FEMA Trailers" that were provided for the thousands of displaced folks who lost everything they would have had to live on the street. I've seen folks who've had to live on the street in military issued army cots and wool blankets cooking their food and boiling their coffee out of 55 gallon steel drums with fuel scavenged from the debris of destroyed structured tossed about the disaster area. It was not a pleasant site. I would much prefer a FEMA trailer any day compared to the army cot and 55 gallon drum.

Finally, as I stated earlier. If you do purchase a MH and move it to a new location you will not be eligible for any type of long term FHA guaranteed forward or reverse mortgage. We work in this field and have seen many very disappointed home owners not qualifying for conventional financing for this reason. If you are ever going to plan on seeking an FHA guaranteed reverse mortgage you had better plan on purchasing a new home specifically for the property you wish it to be placed on.

We are a one stop, turnkey family owned and operated real estate broker, general and manufactured home contractor, manufactured home dealer and developer with over 100 years of combined experience in architectural, engineering, landscape and interior design services provided by one family.

Feel free to logon to any of our very user freindly websites:
http://www.onthelevelcontractors.com http://www.mh-processing.com http://www.chadofalltrades.com http://www.intimatelivinginteriors.com http://www.tagrealestatesales.com
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Nov 27, 2012
Darrell...I'm not really sure where you stand, could you elaborate on whether you are for or against mobile homes?

Sheesh! I"m not a huge fan of MH's either, but a balanced approach is always preferrable. There ARE advantages to mobile homes that are quite appealing to some home buyers, with price typically leading the list. Not everyone can afford a palace (or even a very modest home sometimes!). We should endeavor to avoid insulting the folks seeking advice in this (or any) forum...
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Nov 27, 2012
Mobile homes are low class, short lived, poor investments, that are not permitted to be in locations other than parks. For a Reason. So if you want to make a mistake, and get a fine, you can plop a mobile home down on some semi-rural land, piss all the neighbors off so they complain, get the officials out there, and they will start process to remove you from your own land if you just do things like move a mobile home on to your own land with out the right to do it.

I'm maintaining my truth here, and it is surprising there are people defending mobile homes.

Its also sad to see FEMA use mobile homes for people who have been struck by disasters.

It is sad too, that mobile homes never have class, even in a park. They have to be regulated by managers since, for some reason, they attract low life.

They are a bad use of natural resources, and a really bad investment.

You can easily build a new real house with an Architect if you have a head on your shoulders.

I wouldn't stick my Grandmother in a Mobile Home. Its not accessible. Its drafty, noisy, unsightly, and prone to freezing the pipes, and they are poor energy hogs since they are too thin and under insulated. They are just plain ugly. It should never have happened. They need to be BANNED.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Nov 27, 2012
As the former local building inspector, there are a few reasons you might not be able to:
1. Age of the MH. Apple Valley, Hesperia, and Victorville all have slightly different criteria, but to qualify for most, the mobile home will have to be newer than 1992 to meet CA Energy Code requirements.
The High Desert has the most restrictive climate zone because of the temperature variations here. New "stick built" homes will need 2x6 construction, super high efficiency windows, HERS testing, and/or HVAC plenums and ducting run under the insulation level.
2. You could spend the money upgrading the MH if it needs it.
3. How do you plan to use that MH? CA still allows a "grandma house", but those and 2nd dwellings must meet zoning requirements as a percentage of square footage.

Find out what jurisdiction your property is in (municipal or county) and then contact their offices for their specific requirements. You might be able to get a variance for some things if you apply, or even need one, as many of the jurisdictions don't have much work for their building departments.

There might be a market for Mr. Arendsen to move older homes(From 1976-1991) out of the High Desert to Encinitas because of the new CEC rules in this climate zone, as Encinitas has much more temperate weather.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Nov 26, 2012
Today's Factory Built Housing is anything but depressing. Do your homework before making such rediculous comments.

FYI Darrell todays "Factory Built Housing" can be made to look just like anything you could ever design. I've been in this industry for almost 3 decades and frankly take your irresponsible comments quite seriously as it can really influence an unwary consumer against the relavence and practicality of this very fine and credible choice of housing.

http://www.mh-processing.com
http://www.chadofalltrades.com
http://www.sandiegorealestatetoday.com
http://www.tagrealestatesales.com
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Sep 25, 2012
Would this be a 2nd dwelling on your property aka Accessory Dwelling Unit (ADU) by any chance? If so you would definitely need to speak with your building & planning dept and find out what the parameters are in your immediate area.

Additionally, please understand that once a MH is moved from its original situs (location) to another location you will not be able to secure an FHA guaranteed forward or reverse mortgage. Additionally, most building jurisdictions will not permit a home that was built before June 15, 1976.

In any event you really need to start with your local building jurisdiction. Good luck.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Sep 25, 2012
Why don't you just build a house with a guy like me drawing the plans, and make it an architectural job at the same time so it looks fantastic instead of depressing like a mobile home is depressing.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Sep 25, 2012
I don't think you can do that because of blight ordinances. It will be taken down and you'll pay a fine I believe.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Sep 25, 2012
Lot you need to know about this before you do anything. We've been in all facets of the MH industry for 30 years and would be happy to help you before you do something you regret. Please feel free to contact us anytime:

760 815-6977
onthelevel@cox.net

Or feel free to logon to any of our very user freindly websites:

http://www.onthelevelcontractors.com
http://www.mh-processing.com
http://www.chadofalltrades.com
http://www.intimatelivinginteriors.com
http://www.tagrealestatesales.com
0 votes Thank Flag Link Fri Sep 7, 2012
Hi Roger,

There shouldn't be any reason why you couldn't move the mobile home to your property. First, you should consider the cost to move the mobile and any required permits. Depending on the size of the home, it could be pretty pricey to move it. Also, check whether or not your property is zoned for mobile homes. I sold a mobile in that same park and the sellers moved it almost 100 miles away.
Please do not hesitate to contact me if you have any other questions.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Fri Sep 7, 2012
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