Home Buying in Allen>Question Details

Da, Home Buyer in Allen, TX

Inspection Report

Asked by Da, Allen, TX Wed Jan 21, 2009

Is the buyer supposed to share the home inspection report with the Seller. If there are obvious things that needs to be fixed, why does the seller need to share the complete inspection report.

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The purpose of an inspection is to uncover material defects, not make a 6 page repair list for the seller to deliver you a perfect house. If the property has so many defects that it would require you to share the entire report, are you sure you want to buy this home? Address defects and major concerns, and share the portions of the report that validate those concerns. As far as the lose screws go, bring your own screwdriver.

As a sellers agent, I will tell a buyers agent to ask their buyer to address defects not imperfections, and advise my seller to focus on the same.

As a buyers agent, I attempt to tell my buyers the same. If they don't listen, and want to deliver a fix it list with 147 items, I do.as they request, as an obedient agent. But, I explain to those buyers, that if I were the seller's agent, I would be advising the seller to dismiss the excessive requests.

The buyer does not need to share any portion of the inspection report except that which outlines the defects the buyer is addressing to the seller in the form of a request for credit or repair.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Thu Jan 22, 2009
Deborah Madey, Real Estate Pro in Red Bank, NJ
MVP'08
Contact
Da,
The seller doesn't have to see the inspection report. It is simply a courtesy on your part. You own the report if you paid for it. Your agent can submit the repair request to the seller on an addendum.

Although, if you share the full report with the seller and you end up not buying the house, that seller will be required to share that report with the next buyers.

Even if there are obvious things that need to be fixed, the seller is not required to fix anything. It is all negotiable. Are you doing an option period?

Are you not working with a buyer's agent Da?

Naima
214-289-8555
Naima@Sumner-Realty.com
Web Reference: http://www.SumnerRealty.com
1 vote Thank Flag Link Wed Jan 21, 2009
Da,

This is up to you. If you are the buyer, I would think you might want to share relevant parts for defects you are asking to be fixed. That may help with repairs or help get it fixed for the problem you are describing. If you aren't asking for any repairs no need to share the report. As an example you may ask for a shingle to be replaced, but on the inspection report there might be a picture. This might show the specific damage or specific location of the shingle and therefore it might be easier to share that portion of the report.

If a seller has an inspection report it is important that you share that report with a buyer to keep out of any trouble of fraud. If you have a report that says something is broken or need of repair, but you don't fully disclose it, the buyer buys the house and then wants to file a fraud claim against you they could. Remember fraud can cost you 3x the amount of damages plus court and attorney fees.
Web Reference: http://www.teamlynn.com
0 votes Thank Flag Link Thu Jan 22, 2009
Bruce Lynn, Real Estate Pro in Coppell, TX
MVP'08
Contact
Da,

The seller does not need to see the entire inspection report. The purpose of an inspection is to identify defects that may need to be addressed by the seller. Thus, only concerns to the buyer that require being repaired as per the agreement need to be shared with the seller.

We typically provide the seller with a copy of the inspection overview(one page) and supportive photographs along with a coverletter that clearly outlines the items requiring attention.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Thu Jan 22, 2009
The buyer is the "owner" of the inspection report, since you paid for it. When you wrote your offer...and subsequently went to contract, it was at that time that the inspection issues should have been covered (how long you have to get it and how much the seller will pay for in terms of making repairs). If you purchased it as-is then the seller will make no repairs and should you ddem that the results of the inspection produced things that are unacceptable, you most likely have the right to cancel the contract and receive your deposit back.

The seller will only own the home until you purchase it. The decision to share the report is strictly up to you.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Jan 21, 2009
Normally a buyer will share parts of the report, because the buyer is trying to get every item fixed. Key word is trying. Your agent should explain to you, you get an inspection to make sure your home is in good condition,
That it is structally sound, the main componets work, no foundation issues that are detected, no termites. Sometimes buyer's make a mistake, ny thinking their used home is going to be perfect. I have seen an inspection report asking for 3 screws in a door jam? It is not a new home, and a family did live in that home. I have seen brand new homes that should have had home insector's didn't and defects in the new home could be avoided. I always suggest even on a new built, that a home inspection be done. Example I had one client small kids, ready to close, and sink base wasn't secured.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Jan 21, 2009
Your buyers agent should be assisting you with all your concerns. However seller does not need to see the report just request for items you like repaired needs have an amendment signed by buyer/seller.
Web Reference: http://www.lynn911.com
0 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Jan 21, 2009
Da,

Only the items the buyer wants repaired need be shared with the seller. If it's the seller's inspection report, Texas is a full disclosure state and must share with the buyer.

Does this clear it up?

Thanks,
Terri Hayley
Keller Williams, The Hayley Group
0 votes Thank Flag Link Wed Jan 21, 2009
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