Home Buying in 11758>Question Details

Louc, Home Seller in 11364

If the buyer signed the contract and the seller didnt can the seller still show the house

Asked by Louc, 11364 Sat Sep 1, 2012

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11
the buyer signed an offer. It doesn't become a contract until both parties have come to an agreement and signed. So yes, until your offer is accepted, they can show. And even after, they can show and take backup offers
1 vote Thank Flag Link Sat Sep 1, 2012
Yes, until the offer is accepted by the seller you have nothing binding. It's not unusual at all. I have had many situations where the seller is hoping for a better offer and drags their feet for several days before accepting our offer.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Sat Sep 1, 2012
So they let us pay for a home inspection. not fair
Flag Sat Sep 1, 2012
Good question:

Yes, The seller can still show the house until the contract is fully executed (signed by both parties).

Maurice Eason
Licensed RE Salesperson
Exit Realty Premier
(516) 443-3382
http://www.exitrealty.com/4MinuteMillion
0 votes Thank Flag Link Wed May 15, 2013
Until contracts are fully executed ( both the buyer and seller signs) the home is still available to show. But, the listing agent and agency is obligated to give the correct and current status of the home to any agent that calls to show the property. Which means they should be told that their is an accepted offer with contracts half signed.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Sep 4, 2012
Yes, and this points out one of the hazards as a buyer--signing a contract when a seller is not really on board.

Now the seller is using the buyer's signature to shop their house and get a better offer, if possible.

This is one of the reasons buyers enlist the help of a buyer's agent. Any real estate agent who wants to can represent you as a buyer.

A good agent assesses the situation in advance, and the agent keeps the deal on track as much as possible.

If you're the seller, if you let a buyer sign a contract without any intention of counter-signing, that is not nice and tactics like that have a way of backfiring. There are better ways to handle a low offer.

Karla Harby
Licensed Real Estate Salesperson
Rutenberg Realty
New York, NY
212-688-1000x146
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sun Sep 2, 2012
Hi Louc,
Until the contracts are completely executed (signed) by both the buyer and seller, the home is still available to be shown and sold. Unless both parties have signed the contract, it can be said that there is no meeting of the minds amd so the contract is not binding.
If you have any further questions please contact me.

Regards,
Arlynn

Arlynn B. Palmer
Assoc Broker
Daniel Gale Sotheby's International Realty
516.410.3594
Arlynn@ArlynnPalmer.com
Web Reference: http://www.ArlynnPalmer.com
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sat Sep 1, 2012
Yes the seller can continue showings; for any necessary legal advice consult with your attorney
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sat Sep 1, 2012
Hey Louc! Yes. Legally the homeowner can show the house, because there is no binding contract until all parties have signed the contracts. This is called "half in contract."

I hope this answered your question.

Wishing you the best of luck,

De Vonte Williamson, LSA
Coldwell Banker Residential
Direct: (631)638-6193
http://www.cbmoves.com/DeVonte.Williamson
"I Stand Behind Getting You Results!"
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sat Sep 1, 2012
Hi Louc,

Yes. If all parties have not signed the contract, there is no contract. For a contract to be legally binding, all parties have to sign - there are no verbal contracts in Real Estate.

Shanna Rogers
SR Realty
http://www.RealtyBySR.com
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sat Sep 1, 2012
Yes, no offer is considered fully accepted until contracts are fully signed by both the buyer and the seller and a homeowner may continue showing his property until such time.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sat Sep 1, 2012
Yes. Nothing you can do about.
Web Reference: http://www.bverealty.com
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sat Sep 1, 2012
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