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Jared, Home Buyer in

How reluctantly do listing agents show homes?

Asked by Jared, Sun Jul 6, 2008

I didn't want to hijack another thread so I started a new question. It sounds like a buyer who calls a listing agent to look at a home is getting some hostility. For the sake of arguement I'll use my situation, but I'd prefer answers be more general. I don't have a buyers agent yet because I'm not in a hurry and I only look at homes that grab my attention. I don't want to be locked in or waste a buyers agents time when I might not find a home I love for a year. I will tell you if you ask at the showing that I don't have an agent and do not want you to represent me because I am not comfortable with one agent covering the buyer and seller.

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the first question I'm going to ask you, when you ask to view the home, is: Are you currently working with an agent?.. and if yes, I'm going to redirect you to your agent to make the appointment to view the home.

If the answer is no, the second question I'll ask is: When would you like to see the home? As the listing agent, my job is to sell the home. I'm happy to accompany an unaffiliated buyer to see it, whether they become my client or not.

If you should determine that you want to purchase my listing, I'm going to turn you over to a different agent in our office to represent you, since I am contractually obligated to represent the seller. Illinois allows "designated agency", which makes sure that the buyer is fully represented, and so is the seller.
3 votes Thank Flag Link Sun Jul 6, 2008
Alan May, Real Estate Pro in Evanston, IL
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This is the list of the 10 examples of buyer inquiries as referenced in the prior post.

1) Some listing agents specialize in representing sellers only and do not want to work with buyers. When a listing agent specializes in seller only representation, the buyer inquiries are redirected to another person in the company that does work with buyers. The agent who takes the inquiry may work as a designated member of the same team as the listing agent, or may have nothing to (directly) do w/ the listing agent other than working for the same company. In this instance, your desire for the listing agent to take you is met by a listing agent who does not work with buyers.

2) Your call may not go to the listing agent, but to the agent on desk duty who is there to assist public inquiries. This agent on desk duty, often has no vested interest in the seller’s property. The agent on desk duty volunteers for this time to secure new leads for that agent to develop business. Their goal is to find a new client, for whatever that client’s interest may be. The agent on desk duty is not going to be paid for the sale of the subject property, unless he/she happens to sell you that property. In this instance, you may look for the desk duty agent to show you the subject property only and have no interest in having that agent represent you, but that agent is looking for clients. (This is why our company has a paid licensed staff. The licensed staff is paid to represent our clients and help any inquirer; and our sellers are pleased to know that representing and selling their property is always first.)

Now….when your call does go to the listing agent, and the listing agent does work w/ buyers……why would a listing agent be reluctant.

1) The listing agent may be concerned that the inquirer has a motive to work with the listing agent to negotiate a lower fee, as Am pointed out. (Agent still has a duty to the seller first, if the buyer is qualified.)

2) Buyer has an agent, but does not wish to “bother their agent” and the listing agent believes the buyer agent should do their job, if they are going to collect compensation. Example: Buyer calls and says, “My Aunt Millie is going to represent us, but she lives 95 miles away and is doesn’t have a lockbox key for this area. Therefore, you need to show us the property.” Listing agents will often take the position that Aunt Millie needs to do her job, if she wants to collect the buyer agent compensation. (Agent still has a duty to the seller first, if the buyer is qualified.)

3) Buyer intends to use a rebate company to write an offer, but expects the listing agent to show the property. Listing agent believes that buyer agent who will get paid should do the work for the buyer. (Agent still has duty to seller first, if the buyer is qualified.)

4) Buyer is not really a buyer, but a FSBO who wants to check out the competing properties for sale. FSBO seller has no agent who can help him/her see properties, so calls the listing agent. Some agents may view this FSBO seller as a potential seller lead, and actually schedule the appointment, utilizing an opportunity to develop rapport with the FSBO. (Agent has duty to the seller, and should deny this appointment; but advise of any public open houses.)

5) Buyer is early stage and seller wants only “now” buyers in his/her property. (Agent has duty to the seller, and should deny this appointment, and invite to an open house, or set up for auto email listings.)

6) Buyer is not really a buyer, but is looking for decorating ideas and heard about the fabulous fireplace and den from a friend. (Agent has duty to the seller, and should deny this appointment.)

7) Buyer is a professional tire kicker. We have a few that have been looking for over 5 years and looking at houses is their main hobby in life. (Agent has duty to the seller, and should deny this appointment.)

8) Buyer is early stage, has not yet found an agent, and seller is flexible about showings or house is vacant. (Agent will probably be very helpful to this buyer inquirer.)

9) Buyer has no pre-qual and advises they are new on job and have no down payment. (Agent has duty to seller, and should deny this appointment.)

10) Buyer is a “now” buyer, has pre-qual, and has no agent. (Agent will ready to pick you up in 10 minutes and take you to see the property.)

Agents really want to sell their seller’s properties, and agents really want to show properties to qualified buyers, or even develop relationships with future buyers. Hope this helps you better understand the mindset of agents and why they want to know about your qualifications and motives. Agents spend a lot of time on non-revenue generating activity and must balance duty to clients, with good business sense.

Deborah
4 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Jul 8, 2008
Deborah Madey, Real Estate Pro in Red Bank, NJ
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Jared,

Am said he would work patiently with buyers for as long as it took to help them. That has been a recurrent representation by many of the Realtors here.

Most listing agents advertise and promote their listings to attract inquires from the public. Ethical agents put the seller first, and care most about securing a contract at highest and best, regardless if it comes in house or from a cooperative broker. Agents often advertised their listings, in addition to the broker’s promotions, and welcome public inquires.

The inquires, the listing agent hopes, will result in 1) qualified buyers for the advertised property or 2) a potential buyer lead that the agent will develop in short or long order as another client. If that person also needs to sell a property; the inquirer represents a potential buyer and seller lead.

You had earlier made a statement that open houses sold houses when JR said that open houses were lead generators for an agent. I explained that statistically few buyers actually buy the open house, but many leads for new business result. There is value for the seller in the open house. There will be attendees who come, with interest or curiosity about that property. But, it won’t be a good match for the buyer. The same in true for telephone and internet inquiries. Few of the inquiries actually result in the sale of the seller’s property. Yes, it does happen…just like it can happen that an open house visitor buys an open house. On any inquiry, odds are higher that the person will buy nothing, or something other than the property inquired about.

Still, agents and brokers advertise homes for sale (used to be in print, now via internet…often with payment for higher rankings in search returns.) It generates inquiries, which might find a buyer for that property, but might also generate new business leads.

So, if we spend all this time and money to get you to call, why do we not want to take you to see the property? Yet, you have head this a lot. The truth is that we hope you might really want to buy that property, and we hope that if you don’t, we can help you find another property. So, why the reluctance? What goes through the listing agent’s mind when an inquiry is received?
Next post……10 examples of buyer inquiries.

Deborah
3 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Jul 8, 2008
Deborah Madey, Real Estate Pro in Red Bank, NJ
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Jared,

You are looking for every agent to work for you on your terms. And, we don't do that. We service our clients. You don't want to be anyone's client, but you want every agent to meet you on your terms. We service clients.

Yes, the seller hired me to market, promote, get a contract, guide from contract to closing. Our sellers know clearly that we will decline to personally show property to individuals who are not serious, who are not qualified, or we will not take on as a buyer. The seller hired me, not you, the person who wants to tour the home. If you as a seller, do not wish to hire me or our firm because we will not agree to personally show the property, that is your choice. As a buyer, or touring visitor, that's not your call. But, you want it to me your call, and you think I should work according to your terms. You are, in effect, saying...."I am not your customer, nor your client....but do your job as I tell you that should do it. I am not the seller, but do your job as listing agent as it meets my needs because that is what I want."

When you are someone’s client, you will find the business or service provider will be more receptive to meeting your wants and terms.

Pre-approvals have been a main-stay in the real estate business for years and years.

Your comment about not valuing our staff shows how much you don't understand. We have buyer agents call our staff and ask them specific questions about the property. One of the big consumer complaints in real estate is that when they call an office, the person who helps them on the phone so often has never been to the property, and can only read to them what is on the sheet. Our licensed staff receives calls from buyer agents and consumers and we receive a lot of compliments from agents, sellers and buyers about our service. It is odd that you think that you know everything because you can read a property listing online that has limited info, but buyer agents who read detailed listing sheets still can have questions for us.

We are happy to show our listings to qualified buyers. We are always looking for additional clients and customers. You have clearly conveyed you are not ready to buy, and not interested in becoming a client. So, we might take a pass. You could be not ready to buy, but be interested in finding a good buyer agent…..and that may influence our decision. If I was showing to another buyer, or helping a buyer agent, I would suggest you come at a time just prior or after. In other words, I will meet you at the property if it works easily. I would always invite you to a scheduled open house. If I chose not to personally show you the property, I might even help refer you to another brokerage where someone might. I know of one rather large brokerage that recruits a lot of newly licensed agents, who have more time and less selectivity. I might suggest that route for you. The seller gets his house shown and you get your appointment…providing you meet the seller’s guidelines for showings.

I have to go help real clients now. J

Deborah
3 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Jul 7, 2008
Deborah Madey, Real Estate Pro in Red Bank, NJ
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You are wrong again. We require all buyer clients to be pre-approved with a lender. This did not just start with the recent economy, but years ago. It started when we took the first person such as yourself, who was just wasting our time and then decided it would be best to make certain that anyone we take to look at homes is as serious about buying a home as we are serious about finding the right property for that person. I think you would be happier simply displaying your attitude in this thread than you would finding a home. You show disregard for the process in it's entirety.
No rational home buyer acts out like you. I think we've all been punked by your fantastic ability to show rude disregard for professionals who have been educated to look out for your best interests. Instead, you would rather carry on your rant about agents and how they don't cower down to your conduct.
Good Luck.
3 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Jul 7, 2008
Hi Again Cindy,

Yes, I would accept a recent bank statement in lieu of a pre approval letter. :-)

About the buyer agency agreement.......If a buyer told me about a bad experience...as you had.....I would highlight the cancellation clause and the one day clause for their benefit. Many agents do not use buyer agency agreements. For those who do.......the willingness or reluctance of the buyer can be a strong indicator of their commitment or lack thereof. Many agents work strictly on the "feel" of loyalty and trust, although there is a movement away from this and toward agreements....even one day agreements.

As a buyer agent, I want to know how serious a buyer is, that they are qualified, and their time frame. I am very accepting of a long time frame. I want to know what the parameters are so I can meet a buyers needs while balancing my work schedule and meeting the needs of other clients. I just picked up a buyer client who sold their home FSBO and they have a closing in 3 weeks with no where to go. I am still tending to my buyers who are looking to buy in 6 months, but it helps me to balance my schedule to know this.

Loyalty and consideration are reciprocal. And, we're human, we like to know that our efforts are appreciated. Of course, loyalty has to be earned, also.

Hope you find a great buyers agent!

Deborah
3 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Jul 7, 2008
Deborah Madey, Real Estate Pro in Red Bank, NJ
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Jared,

The listing agent’s job is to represent the seller. That means finding them a buyer, and not wasting their time, or intruding upon their schedules, and into their privacy and homes with unqualified buyers or tire kickers.

If you are not a ready, willing, and able buyer, chances are high that I will show you my listing. That is, provided you do not already have a buyers agent. If you do have an agent, he/she is paid to show you the property, among his/her other duties. If I am unable to accommodate your schedule, I will direct you to another agent within our firm or even outside of our agency. If you are a qualified and motivated buyer, my goal, as a listing agent, is to get you in the property.

If you call me to see a listing, I am going to ask you a few questions to qualify you as a buyer. I do not have an obligation to run out and show unqualified buyers properties simply because they ask.

It is not my responsibility to personally show you my listings. There are thousands of agents in our MLS who could show you the property, and many who will not require you to be a qualified buyer. The seller is the ultimate decision maker, and I provide advice to the seller. If the seller determines that only pre-qualified buyers can tour the property, I will inquire about the buyer’s qualifications before setting appointments for even a buyer’s agent.

If you have questions that a buyer agent is unable to answer, our office staff will probably be able to help you. We have client relations representatives who are licensees, and salaried staff. They do not work on commission. They have visited our listings, and know them well. They typically do not show properties to buyers, but schedule appointments for field agents to show properties instead. They will answer questions over the phone, send emails, faxes and look up additional information as requested. As it pertains to seller support, our client relations representatives are available M-F during business hours, and will answer any questions about any of our listings. They usually have direct relationships with the seller to find out additional info if needed. Of course, calls and questions come to me directly, also.

Our obligation when we are the listing broker is to market and promote the seller’s property; to advise the seller on market conditions, and guide through contract negotiations and reach a successful and smooth closing. We provide exceptional seller support for instant information about any of our represented properties. We don’t rush out and accommodate every showing request. It depends upon the qualifications and motivation of the buyer.

Deborah Madey - Broker
Peninsula Realty Group
PeninsulaFirst
3 votes Thank Flag Link Sun Jul 6, 2008
Deborah Madey, Real Estate Pro in Red Bank, NJ
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Jared,
The answer to your question, as a listing agent I will show my listings to a qualified buyer as quickly as I can. I will schedule an appointment with the perspective buyer to see the property. Most times I can meet readily, however, there are times that I cannot because of other obligations. It is not always possible to drop everything and go show a property, which is what you might be reading as not flexible. There is a but to this, and that is, as a listing agent I am obligated to bring only qualified buyers to my sellers, and that will mean that I will verify that the perspective buyer has a pre-qualified or pre-approval letter from a lender prior to showing the property. If you are not a qualified buyer or refuse to produce the required documentation, then I won't show you the property, especially with today's gas prices.. However, if you are out looking it would be respectable to respond to the agent when you are called for a follow up. You may be getting pushback if you are not returning calls from these agents when they are looking for feedback or followup.
That is as straight as it gets... Good luck in your search.
3 votes Thank Flag Link Sun Jul 6, 2008
How often are the houses you represent open? Not just that good one, but all of them.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Jared, do I tell you how to do your job? Perhaps you should get a license because you seem to know our business better than all of us.
2 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Jul 7, 2008
That being said, pawning you duties off on the 4000 other agents who can show the home is an insult. Didn't you convince your client to use you, not one of the other 4000 agents?
~~~~~~~~~~~~
Jared, a homeowner who requires the listing agent to be at every showing is cutting the work for from thousands down to ONE AGENT. I recently had a call from a customer who was coming out for the first time to look at houses over a million. One house I called to make an appointment the agent said absolutely not that weekend as she had to be at every showing. He bought a house that weekend, his first time in the area. So don't be insulted.


Jared: I don't need a flyer, I already found the house. I want to see the property. There are licensed cabbies who can take me to the curb, but I still need an agent to let me in.
The issue of a pre-approval letter is (opinion) just something that came about in the credit crunch because you guys are tired of being jerked around by people who can't afford a movie so they go looking at houses.

JR: No, the preapproval letter has been around a long time. It is a way of having people prove they can afford a house (everyone says "I'm paying cash" in order to get around it, but a MOTIVATED BUYER gets a letter saying he has the cash). Jared, believe it or not, there are a lot of unmotivated buyers around. We "convince" our clients to hire us because we are only going to bring MOTIVATED BUYERS, not a lot of lookers. Our clients want to move "as soon as possible", NOT in the next 2 or 3 years. If you don't want to move in as soon as possible, then you aren't the buyer for this listing. You seem very insulted by that, and every once in a while someone gets their panties in a wad because we ask questions to determine motivation. Sometimes they even go around us directly to our clients who back us up because WE ARE DOING OUR JOBS.
2 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Jul 7, 2008
Hi Cindy,
I am sorry that you have not been treated better by the Realtors you have met. Cindi's buyer broker agreement referenced in her post was for one day, one property. No buyer should get 'stuck" as a result.

If any buyer is in a buyer broker agreement, and the buyer agent fails to deliver, the buyer should execute any and all options to cancel the agreement. The buyer broker agreement that our company uses allows a buyer to cancel at any time, and no reason is required. The properties shown to the buyer durinmg the time period are covered by the agreement. As the Broker for the company, if any buyer contacted me with complaints or concerns about thier buyer agent, I would offer the option of an alternate representative or void the agreement, if that is wha tthe buyer wanted. We use the buyer broker agreement to clarify the relationship, not to trap people against their will. Again, I am sorry to hear that your experiences have been stressful and adversarial.

Deborah
2 votes Thank Flag Link Sun Jul 6, 2008
Deborah Madey, Real Estate Pro in Red Bank, NJ
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If the buyer has a pre-qualification in hand and is willing to sign an employment with the agent, why wouldnt the agent want to help

however, if the person calls, but doesnt want to commit, I guess I can understand why the agent would not want to waste her time or at least 4.25 per gal gas!
1 vote Thank Flag Link Tue Jul 8, 2008
With all due respect, those who are not in the real estate business do think, as you do, Jared, that Open Houses are a great place to sell your house.

In reality, JR is absolutely correct. Open Houses rarely sell the property that you're sitting in. But they are a great place to find a new client. Not because we're sitting in the house "trolling for clients"... but because the client comes into the house, we chat a bit, they tell us that this house isn't for them, (it's too big, too small, too expensive, no master bath... whatever), and then we ask a few more questions and they leave.

After they leave, they start chatting, and say "Hey, Elv!s seemed like a nice guy, maybe we should see if he can help us find a place, instead of walking into these open houses every Sunday.

I totally agree with you, that the Open House's main thrust should be promoting the house that you're sitting in, and I object when I walk into an Open House and see "the Elvis Show" on the table, extolling the virtues of the agent, and only 1 single photocopied sheet about the house.

In fact, when a viewer tells me (while I'm sitting an open house) that this house is not for them... do I have anything else that might suit them... I will not talk about other properties, while I'm at that open house. I hand them my card, or take their number, and tell them "once I'm done with this open house, I will contact you (or you can contact me) and I'll be happy to discuss other possibilities... but while I'm here at this open house, my obligations are to promote this home for the seller".
1 vote Thank Flag Link Tue Jul 8, 2008
Alan May, Real Estate Pro in Evanston, IL
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Jared,
Thanks for your clarification on the open house position. Yes, I agree, whoever is at the open house should first and foremost be representing the seller's interest. Only, if and when an open house visitor states the OH is not for them, should there be any other discussion. While I respect your position that you do not want to hear about other houses, and I take my cues from the prospective buyer, not all OH attendees share your same views. OH atendees are often looking for and expect the host agent to guide them. Their reasons range from sincere buyer, to buyer looking to pick your brain and use a discount rebater, to FSBO looking to price their home, to potential seller interviewing agents.

Since some OH attendees are going to expect this, I would ask that you be tolerant of an agent's initial inquiry, but commincate your position as being focused only on looking at that property. The OH agent should respecct that once it is known.

On the note of providing your personal information.......You are a guest in someone's personal home. You owe it that seller and agent to identify yourself. You can certainly make note to not contact you.

Deborah
1 vote Thank Flag Link Tue Jul 8, 2008
Deborah Madey, Real Estate Pro in Red Bank, NJ
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You people still can't differentiate ready from necessity,
~~~~~~~~
You waste 1000 words castigating us for explaining to you how we work and then toss this one out. IMO you have an attitude that most agents may not want to spend a lot of time with. People forget that while they are interviewing us to see if they want to work with us, we are interviewing them to see if we want to work with them, also. It goes both ways.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Mon Jul 7, 2008
Hi all!

This thread was our most viewed on Trulia Voices within the last week. Thanks to Jared an everyone who shared their thoughts on the matter. We did a blog post on it today and highlighted some of you and your comments.

http://www.truliablog.com/2008/07/07/home-buyer-question-can…

I can't wait to see what next weeks most popular thread will be :)

Rudy
Social Media Guru at Trulia
1 vote Thank Flag Link Mon Jul 7, 2008
First the bad news. The listing agent is bound by ethics to bring only Ready, Willing and Able buyers to the listed house. You are not yet Ready, so you shouldn't be allowed in. That sounds rigid, but it is our duty to the seller.
The good news. You should be able to find an agent to work as your buyer's agent that would be willing to set up an email search for you that automatically emails you information on houses as they hit the market. Don't go on a showing until your are ready to buy, but this will allow you to track the market when you are.

If you don't want a buyer's agent, and you are not ready to buy, why would any agent want to spend their time and gas with you? Agents get paid commission, do you work for free at your job?
Good Luck,
Fred
1 vote Thank Flag Link Mon Jul 7, 2008
My refusal to show my client's listing to you is based on the fact that you have no pre-approval letter from a lender. You simply state all the information about your income and credit, but that is not acceptable to a seller. In this way, I am looking out for my client's interests. You never know nowadays who you might be trying to gain access to your client;s home for other reasons besides a possible purchase.
The pre-approval letter shows that you are completing activities of a normal buyer in process of purchasing. Where I am from, this letter is no charge to a buyer, so you would be out nothing but a little of your time, There are three lenders in town that take your application on line, so it would not be an inconvenience to you. It is only you basically refusing to co-operate with the system in place for buyers and sellers.
And by the way, we do NOT use buyer agency agreements here. We work with clients based on loyalty and trust. You have displayed neither of these qualities in your answers, thus our refusal to work with anyone who behaves in your manner. There are many agents who might work with you....but we would choose not to do so. Life is too short for your aggravation.
Also, Deborah....as nice as you are being.....you are wasting your time trying to talk rational behavior to this person. Although you can just barely see the outline of a person in his photo provided with his profile, you can really see right thru him.
Don
1 vote Thank Flag Link Mon Jul 7, 2008
Jared,
I certainly and totally respect your right to not enter a dual agency relationship. Since you are not willing to deal with a different agent, same brokerage, that is even more of a reason for you to have your own buyer agent. If that buyer agent finds you a home that would be under the same brokerage, he/she could arrange for a referral fee for his/her work in your journey to purchase a home.

You perceive that a listing agent's job is to show you or anyone who requests the property. I don't. There are 4000++ agents who can "show" you one of our lisitngs. We pay licensed admin staff to be available instantly to provide detailed info about any of our listings to any agent and to any buyer. A caller is not dependent upon the listing agent to be available. Our support for our sellers and our ability to provide instant info about listings is superb. Our licensed admin staff visit the properties for all of our full service lisitngs. We have express service lisitngs where that might not be true....but most sellers choose full service.

Our services, and our job, is to fully support the marketing, promotion, near instant and thorugh info about our represented properties. Our sellers understand that any one of 4000+ agents can show the listing, and in some cases.......the seller prefers that a cooperative agent shows their property, and not us. Just as you said you do not want a double end deal....some sellers prefer we have limited contact and engagement with the buyer.

When we can, and when the buyer is qualified, yes we show our lisitngs. In our presentation and proposal to sellers, we do not include...." We jump instantly to run over and unlock the door for any person who calls to show your property anytime." When we take a listing, our focus and priority is the seller and the seller's needs. Running and jumping for unqualified buyers is not in our sellers best interest. It's actually insulting to a seller, showing disrespect for the seller and his/her property.

Now, turn the tables and say you want to hire us for a buyers agent, and you will hear how we focus on you, your priorities, your time frame, and how our client relations licensed staff are there for you for months upon months with instant property and market updates, and how committed we are to finding you the right home.

Bottom line......We look for clients and take our fiduciary very seriously.

Deborah
1 vote Thank Flag Link Mon Jul 7, 2008
Deborah Madey, Real Estate Pro in Red Bank, NJ
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Cindy,
A buyer can sign a buyer broker agreement for just one day or just one house. I understand that you might not want to make a long term commitment to someone who you just met. Why would you oppose an agreement that states agent who took you to the property was entitled to be paid on that transaction if you purchased that particular property?
1 vote Thank Flag Link Sun Jul 6, 2008
Deborah Madey, Real Estate Pro in Red Bank, NJ
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Hi Jared,

I think you are taking the good informed approach - but don't expect most agent's to love you for it! As a buyer's agent, I appreciate my time not being wasted. As a listing agent, I would have no problem with you being up front with me. I would simply have you come by at an open house or after another showing with an active buyer so my time remains well spent. Nothing is wrong with taking your time.

Some listing agents will have a problem with what you are doing because agents get a lot of inquiries from unqualified prospects especially in this market where qualifiying is tough. Having a buyer's agent tells them you are worth an agent's time. Also, some sellers would be furious that an unqualified buyer was toured through their home because they hate having people toured through their home at all. Some are more relaxed about it. As a result, if you don't allow a listing agent "pre-qualify" you may meet with resistance.

Good luck,

Tni
1 vote Thank Flag Link Sun Jul 6, 2008
No,,not a discount broker....we charge 7% as a matter of fact. But we also get to choose who we work with, and when we see people such as yourself, whether a buyer or a seller, we politely ask that you go ahead and pick another agent. Our commission is not so important that we also want to struggle with an attitude like the one that you display. I have read much of your other 44 answers on Trulia and you truly need to get a better lease on life. You have made yourself an expert in a field that you know very little about and apparently refuse to accept profesional help or you might be boxed in to actually making a decison on a home. God speed to any agent you do work with and good luck with your home search.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Sun Jul 6, 2008
Hi,
That is disappointing to hear. Have you communicated your desire to buy soon, and have you started the mortgage application process?

I don't personally know the following individuals, but the following have credentials that would indicate they are worthy of a short list to call and talk with about your goals.

http://www.pattcombs.com/
http://www.cindyslabaugh.com/

I am a CRS (Council of Residential Specialists) and active member of WCR (Women's Council of Realtors). I provided the above contacts because of their membership status with these organizations. Generally, members are attentive, well educated and professional. Members also don't pay dues to belong to these organizations if they aren't serious about their real estate careers. I don't know either of these Realtors personally. It might be worth picking up the phone and discussing your needs with them to see if either of them might be a good fit for you.

Regards,
Deborah Madey - Broker
Peninsula Realty Group - New Jersey
732 530-6350
Deborah@PeninsulaFirst.com
1 vote Thank Flag Link Sun Jul 6, 2008
Deborah Madey, Real Estate Pro in Red Bank, NJ
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no time to read all of this, and not sure where you are. but, seriously, consider a buyers agent - just be honest about your situation. what i do with buyers like you (many of them)... is:
* make sure you're financially qualified
* set you up to get automatic emails about homes that might meet your criteria - and include the virtual tours, address, directions
* send you a weekly list of open houses
* talk to you weekly to "take your temperature"
If you have done a drive by and you like something, and you've seen the listing, then we go look at it. Eventually, this pattern gets going well enough that you buy; and the whole time we're honest with each other... it's kind of like when you're "just dating" someone - you have to know they aren't always gonna be available on Saturday night.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Sun Jul 6, 2008
i dont know what the problem is, but i find them EXTREMELY RELUCTANT where i live. it is like nobody wants to do their job.

i would think they would jump at the chance to make a commission
1 vote Thank Flag Link Sun Jul 6, 2008
Jared,
When i get a call about my listing my first questions is "are you working with an Agent "? The second questions is " would you like to see the Home "? I never consider showing my listing is a waiste of time, it is my Job. As well as showing homes until my buyers finds the right one.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Sun Jul 6, 2008
JR and the others who responded similarly. I'm not wasting the buyers agents time. They get paid when the home sells. They know (if they did the magic CMA) that the house should move in a relative amount of time. I may not want find the house I want for a long while. I've been looking for a while and I don't have any need to move (relocation etc.) Other buyers have also experienced the pressue of feeling like they wasted an agents time, and several agents have essentially tried to sugarcoat a "Don't waste my time" response (JR). Going into a buyers agents office is like blood in the water EVERY time I've done it. I don't want to deal with the high pressure sales pitch when I could just call someone who is already getting paid to represent the property. As a note to the sales pitch, agents have regularly wasted more of my time on the "use me to represent you" pitch than it took to show the house. If I were paying you to sell my house I wouldn't be happy to know you drove off a customer because you wanted the other 3%.
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Jared, have you heard the phrase "motivated seller"? You are what is known as an "unmotivated buyer". That is the entire purpose of questioning buyers is to determine motivation. I show my listings to all who request a showing. IF the home doesn't fit their needs and they are a motivated buyer, I show them home that will meet their needs. If they are an unmotivated buyer...."NEXT"! We don't have time to waste on unmotivated buyers, Jared. Sorry about that. I know what has happened when I've worked with people for an extended period of time: they walk into someone's open, or call on a listing and buy from that agent. I can spend my time more productively.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Sun Jul 6, 2008
I don't want to be locked in or waste a buyers agents time
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How do you feel about wasting a listing agent's time?
1 vote Thank Flag Link Sun Jul 6, 2008
Hello Jared. While I think it's nice of you to not want to waste the buyer's agent time, I think you should leave it up to the agent to determine whether it's a waste of his/her time to show you houses. When I represent a buyer, I don't consider showing houses a waste of time as it gives me an opportunity to learn more about the likes and dislikes of my client. It could be a waste of time if the potential buyer knowingly only uses me to unlock doors. I think there are lots of agents out there who'd be happy to show you houses as long as it takes with the understanding that they'll be the ones who will represent you when you have found the perfect house. By not giving the agent the opportunity to show you houses, you really are depriving the agent of getting to know your likes and dislikes and you are not doing the agent a favor.

Could it be that you are asking the listing agent to show you the house instead because you know you don't have to make any kind of commitment to the listing agent since you would not want the listing agent to represent you in the purchase anyway? I hope we can agree that the time of a listing agent is as valuable as the time of a buyer's agent. So what it boils down to is whether it is part of the listing agent's job to show listings to buyers who are just looking. I believe that it is the listing agent's job to market the property and of course showing your own listings is part of that and I think that's one of the reasons why we hold open houses. It gives those who just want to browse on their own without wasting anybody's time the opportunity to view the inventory. When I hold an open house, I know that most of the people coming through are not ready to buy and I don't expect them to make an appointment and I don't even expect them to be pre-qualified. I know I'll meet a lot of complete strangers at an open house. Open houses are the only time I will show my listings to complete strangers whom I have never met and who don't have to show to me that they are qualified to buy this listing and I don't think agreeing to show the listing to anybody who expresses an interest in seeing the house can be reasonably expected by a seller. I know that the seller just wants to sell the house, but I also think that the seller has no legitimate interest in having just anybody walk through the house because his/her house might just be the house that this stranger might fall in love with. As a listing agent, my obligation is to my seller and my seller only. I explain to the seller how I qualify the buyers and that I hold open houses to give the no-yet ready lookers an opportunity to see the home. I have never had a seller who did not understand why I won't just drop everything to show their house to a buyer who's just looking. My sellers also understand the security risks involved in showing houses (the risk is to them and the agent).

In summary, I think you should find an agent who will not put pressure on you and who's willing to show you houses as long as it takes. Don't assume that you are wasting their time and expect the listing agents to show you the houses instead because you don't want to waste the buyer's agent time. You could even ask the listing agent when the next open house is and tell the agent that you don't want to waste his/her time but would like to see home. Leave it up to the agent whether he/she wants to waste his/her time. Maybe the listing agent has a buyer's agent who'd be willing to show you the house, but expect to be prequalified.
Good luck to you.
Ute Ferdig
1 vote Thank Flag Link Sun Jul 6, 2008
Ute Ferdig -…, Real Estate Pro in Newcastle, CA
MVP'08
Contact
Hi Jared:

First, I only read your two questions, so here is my answer - If I am a listing agent of a property, and you called me to see the house. I would ask if you have an agent, if you do, than I will ask why your agent can not show it because it is your buyer agent's job to show the property - part of why I split the commission with him. If your agent is out of town or if you told me you don't want to trouble your agent, I might not like to, but I will still show the house to you - My goal as a listing agent is to sell the house and not to show the house to a potential buyer because I don't like how lazy your agent is, is not good enough reason for me.

If you don't have an agent, even if you are still looking around, I will go and show the house to you. Again, my goal is to sell the house, and who knows, this just might be the perfect house for you and you will want to buy this house. It happens! On top of that, maybe you and I will click, and you will decide to use me as your buyers agent even if you don't like this house, that would be a big bonus.

So, no, I don't understand why a Listing Agent refuses to show his listing under any circumstances. Our primary goal is to sell the house!

And you should look for a buyer agent - it amazes me to hear people say that they don't want to 'trouble' their agent while they are looking around. One of a buyer agent's biggest job is to guide their clients through the maze of purchasing a property - including but not limited to getting them started and helping them eliminate many and eventually selecting the one. That should not be a 'trouble' if they want to earn their commission.

And yes, I do work with my client for a year or more, but when they found their house, ,they know that's the right one.

Sylvia
1 vote Thank Flag Link Sun Jul 6, 2008
Sylvia Barry,…, Real Estate Pro in Marin County, CA
MVP'08
Contact
For 1% the listing agent gave us a ton of tips on how to stage our home and what to fix. We did that in 3 days and he put up the sign in front. We got two offers immediately (during the first 6 days) and sold the house for $1k more than we paid the previous year in a market that had already lost at least 10%. We carried both home for just 16 days between one closing and the other. Success. Fred R.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Fri Aug 20, 2010
My opinion is that it is the duty of the listing agent to show their listings to potential buyers, plain and simple. You have a duty to your client (seller) to sell their house, and as long as you make the buyer aware of your agency relationship it is ethical. I would help a buyer purchase my listing and help them sell their house at a lower rate to make both deals happen. Our company even has a "Buy this house, we'll buy yours" program in this area to help do just that. We need to be creative and flexible in this market to get things rolling again.
Web Reference: http://FredPoehlman.com
0 votes Thank Flag Link Fri Aug 8, 2008
Fred...for one percent, how hard do you think your agent is going to work for you? How can he even afford to advertise it if he's making one percent? Seems like you'd be better off making it worth his while!

By the way...the listing agent was all-the-while working for the seller-they did not represent you. Is it possible that if you had buyer representation you could have got the house for even less? I know I go in and beat people up all the time for my buyer clients. Food for thought.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Fri Aug 8, 2008
I think it would be foolish for a listing agent not to show one of their listings upon receiving a call from an interested party. I recently decided to look for another house with a broad golf view in the $550k range in Bridgemill, Canton, GA. I looked for those homes listed on MLS that met my criteria and called each listing agent to view the homes. All were very accomodating and pleasant. I didn't reveal any information about my qualifications when I made the appointment. We looked at 4 houses in the Woodstock and Canton area. We made a verbal offer of $550k on one house listed at $629k. Our offer was with a contingency of 90 days subject to renewal, as we would have to sell our current home that we bought in Aug. 2007. That offer was accepted verbally. Before we decided to put it in writing, we went to see another house nearby that was listed at $600k. This was a much better house, much bigger, and in a better street, surrounded by $800k + homes. We verbally offered $525k with a contingency. After some negotiating we ended up at $550k without a contingency for a closing in Sept. 08. We now have a binding contract. The listing agent reduced the commision to the seller to 4%. We don't have a buyers agent. That listing agent is going to charge us 4% to sell our house (3/1%). We will put our house for sale later this month. We got approved for a mortgage and have a commitment letter in hand. Once we sell our house (probably at a loss) we will apply the proceeds towards the mortgage on the newly purchased home. The moral of the story is that an agent really never knows where a seller is going to come from, therefore, it is to their benefit to attend to any prospective buyer regardless of where the buyer comes from or how he got to the agent.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sun Aug 3, 2008
Jared: Well JR, if you don't ask for some form of verifiable info such as the agents that ask for a DL, then you're not doing a very good job of knowing who came into the house. Every agent who ever asked me for info was fine with a "no thank you."

JR: My partner called the police when someone refused to give their name at one of our listings. He was hollering that he had cash and he INSISTED on seeing it. THe homeowner was in the house. She wrote a letter to our manager saying she was pleased with what the agent did.

Jared: This Strongly suggests that they don't care who I am from a security standpoint. At least if you asked for a DL you could convince me that it was security while you scribbled down my address, but if I get a letter in the mail my info was gathered under false pretense. I don't think that most agents who ask for info intend on Ever saying, "well officer, his e-mail is customer@sendmejunkmail.com."

JR: You have criticism for every phase of the process don't you? Did you ever consider becoming an agent? Obviously you would be more competant than anyone else. DId you ever consider that you're stealing from you boss by posting here all day?


Jared: If everyone on the MLS is also your client, you definitely need to call a few of them and tell them your too busy to handle their sale right now and they should seek a new agent. I think what you meant to say is

JR: You have no idea what I "meant" to say. I "meant" to say what I said.

Jared: that you have a duty to show any buyer you represent any listings they may want to see if they are in the MLS regardless of how much/little they pay, and you are obligated to put you homes on the MLS.

JR: Wrong. That is not what I "meant" to say. You see what happens when you ASSUME again? You have no idea about the law of agency, do you?

Jared: You actually said you'd rather "work your listings." than show one. If you can explain that one away, well done. After a comment like that there isn't much you could say that would please me other than, "You're completly right, how could I be so wrong?" That part was accurate.

JR: If you can show me where I said I would rather "work my listings" than show one and maybe I could explain it. I think what you read was I would rather work my listings than work with buyers.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Jul 8, 2008
As I am convinced I can tell within 2 minutes into a showing as to whether someone considers my home something they would like to buy if they could, or it is really not the one for them; I can just see it in their eyes, no matter what their buyers agent says or does I have just known immediately.
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That's very true, and if the owner isn't there I can usually tell even sooner, like within 30 seconds. Unfortunately, even though we can both tell it isn't the house for someone, when the owner is home the buyer usually makes an effort to look at everything and ask questions. I'd rather the owner isn't home so the buyer doesn't feel he has to go thru the motions.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Jul 8, 2008
Well JR, if you don't ask for some form of verifiable info such as the agents that ask for a DL, then you're not doing a very good job of knowing who came into the house. Every agent who ever asked me for info was fine with a "no thank you." This Strongly suggests that they don't care who I am from a security standpoint. At least if you asked for a DL you could convince me that it was security while you scribbled down my address, but if I get a letter in the mail my info was gathered under false pretense. I don't think that most agents who ask for info intend on Ever saying, "well officer, his e-mail is customer@sendmejunkmail.com."

If everyone on the MLS is also your client, you definitely need to call a few of them and tell them your too busy to handle their sale right now and they should seek a new agent. I think what you meant to say is that you have a duty to show any buyer you represent any listings they may want to see if they are in the MLS regardless of how much/little they pay, and you are obligated to put you homes on the MLS.

You actually said you'd rather "work your listings." than show one. If you can explain that one away, well done. After a comment like that there isn't much you could say that would please me other than, "You're completly right, how could I be so wrong?" That part was accurate.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Jul 8, 2008
Jared:
JR said, "...because open houses is where you get customers." Wrong!


JR: NOT WRONG! Statistically, you have a 2% chance of selling A HOUSE to a customer at an open house, and I don't mean THAT house, I mean A HOUSE. Only 2% of customers to an open house are buyers of anything. Should I be doing open houses 24 hours a days then (with my ONE client since obviously I can't work with two if that's the case), to up my statistics?

Jared: An open house is where you sell a house.

JR: Statistically, not that one.

Jared: Maybe if you didn't distract buyers with "you should let me show you the one with the 4% comission,"

JR: Excuse me, Jared. You are a nasty little guy, aren't you. You are here for no reason at all except to complain. I let my visitors look around and ask them QUALIFYING QUESTIONS because my client is going to pay me if I sell his house to a a QUALIFIED BUYER. When they tell me this house isn't for them, I ask them other questions, what they are looking for in a house and how much and then I think of houses like that. Do you really think any agent knows off the top of their head how much the commission is on any house? You're a real piece of work, Jared.

Jared: you might sell more at open houses.

Also, JR, again, said, "There are customers that we spend time on, trying to stay in touch, sending emails with potential houses, etc, then they call an agent they've never had contact with before and buy." You're LISTING the house in this example. You spend a half hour showing me the house. Assuming of course you don't spend an hour trying to convince me to let you spend all the perviously mentioned time showing me other houses.
The 4000 agent thing is still unexcuasable. I can't wait to hear a client conversation. "If you hire me I'll let 4000 other people show your home. That's why I'm the best!" They can show the house, but you're the one responsible for showing the house. If you want to pawn it off on a realtor doing you a favor that's one thing, but don't act like you don't have to show a clients house unless you'll tell the client that.

JR; That is almost exactly what I say braniac. If you list with me, you have not only the 6,000 (I work for a bigger company) agents of my firm working to sell your house, but the 19,000 agents who work on Long Island. If you restrict showings to just me, you might as well just list with JR Real Estate, one agent, and hope I'm not in the shower when someone calls to see your house.

Let me guess, Jared, you are one of the "me" generation. You want everything your way, now. I'll bet you are a "buyer" who when they call want for the first time wants to see the house "now" and doesn't give his last name or phone number.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Jul 8, 2008
Jared:
I strongly feel that if you are getting paid to sell a house, you (or someone who represents you) should go to it with the purpose of selling the house. Putting cards out, your info on the flyers, and/or offering freebies (pens, magnets, etc.) are all wonderful ideas, but soliciting the customers directly is a huge turn off to me.

JR: Then look around, say thank you, I was just interested in this one, is the polite way to go.

Jared:I hate being asked for my personal info,

JR: Then don't walk into my open house. The homeowner expects me to know who came into his property. You would like me to let complete strangers into your home without knowing who was there. Are you aware there are agents who ask for photo ID. Do you realize how dangerous it is for the agent to let strangers in. You really don't care about the agent, though, do you, you only care about what you want.

Jared:
seeing other property info, etc. This is why I'm critical of his statement, "...I give an agent who has no listings a chance to do one, because open houses is where you get customers. I would rather work with my listings, and find when I have too many customers I can't serve my seller clients as well." The open house is his listing. The attitude is not one of serving his client.

JR: Jared, there's absolutely nothing I can say that would please you except "you're completely right, how could I be so wrong?" is there? You do realize I have more than one client, don't you? Do you think this is my only listing? Do you think I have a duty to sell THOSE listings, also? Do you realize that technically everyone who is listed on the MLS is ALSO my client? I'm sure you don't.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Jul 8, 2008
Deborah, That last post was pretty clear and in good judgement. It repeatedly hit on my main point which was that the duty is to the seller. I think we can agree on all the examples you gave in it and I would feel much more comfortable with you as my agent after seeing it.

The prior post referenced my comments with JR about open houses. I strongly feel that if you are getting paid to sell a house, you (or someone who represents you) should go to it with the purpose of selling the house. Putting cards out, your info on the flyers, and/or offering freebies (pens, magnets, etc.) are all wonderful ideas, but soliciting the customers directly is a huge turn off to me. I hate being asked for my personal info, seeing other property info, etc. This is why I'm critical of his statement, "...I give an agent who has no listings a chance to do one, because open houses is where you get customers. I would rather work with my listings, and find when I have too many customers I can't serve my seller clients as well." The open house is his listing. The attitude is not one of serving his client. When I said an open house is where you sell a house I was speaking to the purpose of the open house being to sell that house, not gather clients. I did not mean that it was the only or most probably way of actually selling the home.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Jul 8, 2008
Arn, You made a great statement with:
"Typically when buyers say they do not have an agent what is really means is they want to buy through the listing agent and since they are "representing themselves" they want a 3% reduction off the price or a 3% credit in escrow. I do not know you and this may not be your intent but often for other buyers it is. Of course in that scenario, the one agent does all the work and gets half the fee. Understandably an agent is not going to be jumping up and down with glee at this prospect. Does that make sense? "

It does make sense, and thank you for that insight. It ads perspective which is never bad. It is unfortunate that sellers would go around you to cut your commision to strike a deal with an unrepresented buyer. My personal reasons for not using the listing agent have nothing to do with saving money on comission, I just feel it creates a moral hazard. I hope the agent who eventually shows me a home understands that.

The heart of my question is what is you view on showing a home you represent as the listing agent and you provided a reason for some reluctance. I am glad that you can have a no pressure relationship with your buying clients. The market here has made that difficult and it sounds like other buyers nationwide feel similarly. Many agents are putting huge presssure on buyers to move quickly and to move up in price if they can get financing. If I had found an agent like you or Tni I would probably not be asking this question at all but now I feel I will either have to ask an agent after I find a home I like or buy with an attorney so I'm not getting the constant barrage. I feel like many agents have given me bad advice, so my opinion currently is that no advice is better than bad advice.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Jul 7, 2008
Jared:

It seems your question has hit a nerve and the tenor of the "conversation" has gotten a little heated.
This is unfortunate as you ask a good question.

Let me give you my perspective based on 30 years in the real estate business.

I tell all my buyer clients:

I can move as quickly or as slowly as you want.
I am in no hurry to sell you a house.
I am more interested in finding the right house for you than I am in making a quick sale.
My business is built on the long-term - building relationships - gaining trust - taking care of people and in turn receiving their repeat business in the future and their advocacy for my business to their friends and associates.
I will show you as many houses as you want. I will go out each week and look for homes that might fit your criteria in terms of location and price range. I will keep you informed as to what is on the market. I will not push you to make a decision. You will make a decision when you feel you have enough data and information and when you find the right property.

In return, I ask for your loyalty. I will be patient and guide you through the process for as long as it takes. But I deserve to be compensated for my efforts. After all, I doubt you work for no money, so why should I? So no matter how long it takes, I will work for you and when you find that right house, I expect you to buy it through me so I am justly compensated for my efforts.

Does this sound like a fair deal to you? You are not wasting my time as long as you make a committment to me. Now if I don't give you time and attention, if I don't keep you posted on the market, if I don't show your property, then I have not earned your business and you are free to go elsewhere. But if I take care of you, I expect to be compensated.

If you or another buyer can not make that comittment then I say Bye Bye and Good Luck - no harm no foul. No hard feelings - I haven't wasted my time and you continue your search in a way you believe to be best - whether your approach is the best way for you, I would argue against but you are entitled to your opinion.

If you do not want to make a committment to an agent then go see the property on an open house - easy and fair to the agent. Why should any agent take time to show you a house when there is no committment on your part when they can show other buyers who have make that committment.? Does that make sense to you?

To put this in concrete terms, years ago I started working with a single woman buyer looking on the SF Peninsula - extreme prices. Let's call her Diane. Diane and I looked together on and off for nearly 18 months. There might be 5 or 6 weeks of concentrated looking and then Diane might be tired of the process or a little frustrated and she would back off for a month or so and then we would hit it again. After 18 months, I found a great townhouse for her in Palo Alto tha thse has now owned for about 7 years. I never became frsutrated with Diane. I knew she wanted to buy. It was just a matter of working through the process - encouraging her - guiding her - supporting her in accomplishing her goal - giving her time to sort through all the conflicting emotions and trade-offs. Diane repeately thanked me for being patient. I aaus no big deal - it is what I do. I knew Diane appreciated my efforts and that when she bought, she would buy through me so no pressure on my end. In the first 6 months of this year, Diane has referred to me two clients who bought resulted in closed escrows - a seller in San Carlos and a buyer in Los Altos.

That is the way I do business.

Typically when buyers say they do not have an agent what is really means is they want to buy through the listing agent and since they are "representing themselves" they want a 3% reduction off the price or a 3% credit in escrow. I do not know you and this may not be your intent but often for other buyers it is. Of course in that scenario, the one agent does all the work and gets half the fee. Understandably an agent is not going to be jumping up and down with glee at this prospect. Does that make sense?

I had dinner tonight with one of the clients Diane referred me this year. They moved here from Columbia 6 years ago. They were unfamiliar with real estate law and custom here in California. They appreciated my efforts - since I took care of Diane and Diane raved about me - this client felt secure and I guided them through the process and through times where their emotions and doubts and fears ran high. This client told me I must have had a minor degree in psychology (actually my Masters is in Physical Chemistry) with the hand holding I did to help them through the process and ultimately make a good decision for themselves. After 30 years, I know how to help people through the process. I do not do it to manipulate them to make a sale - rather I help them make the best decisision for them. The counsel I gave them as the MC commercial says was "PRICELESS".
0 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Jul 7, 2008
Hey JR..........this is why I told this guy hours ago......"You should find a for sale by owner....and purchase without an agent at all....Then..you would be happier and have a great experience." Because ,,as you say,,,his attitude is not one that any professional agent would put up with for any length of time........on the other hand....I think he knows this.......and maybe that's why he wants to spend as little time with a good agent as possible. No matter what, if he ever bellies up and makes an offer to purchase, It will definitely be a transaction that no one will forget....
good luck to all of you agents trying to talk sense to Jared.....He has his answer for everything.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Jul 7, 2008
JR said, "...because open houses is where you get customers." Wrong! An open house is where you sell a house. Maybe if you didn't distract buyers with "you should let me show you the one with the 4% comission," you might sell more at open houses.
Also, JR, again, said, "There are customers that we spend time on, trying to stay in touch, sending emails with potential houses, etc, then they call an agent they've never had contact with before and buy." You're LISTING the house in this example. You spend a half hour showing me the house. Assuming of course you don't spend an hour trying to convince me to let you spend all the perviously mentioned time showing me other houses.
The 4000 agent thing is still unexcuasable. I can't wait to hear a client conversation. "If you hire me I'll let 4000 other people show your home. That's why I'm the best!" They can show the house, but you're the one responsible for showing the house. If you want to pawn it off on a realtor doing you a favor that's one thing, but don't act like you don't have to show a clients house unless you'll tell the client that.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Jul 7, 2008
I find this response especially aggressive and annoying because half of you said you regularly work for clients for YEARS. I'm trying to save that trouble for a buyers agent. I understand that my opinion on pre-approval is a hitch, but other than that, it sounds like you just want a quick sale.
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See that's the point Jared. There are customers that we spend time on, trying to stay in touch, sending emails with potential houses, etc, then they call an agent they've never had contact with before and buy. That's why we try to determine motivation. Just because you say you're ready now doesn't mean you've been ready for 2 years.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Jul 7, 2008
JR responded to my how often are you houses open with, "Jared, do I tell you how to do your job?

JR: That was after I responded to all your OTHER comments with:

Jared, a homeowner who requires the listing agent to be at every showing is cutting the work for from thousands down to ONE AGENT. I recently had a call from a customer who was coming out for the first time to look at houses over a million. One house I called to make an appointment the agent said absolutely not that weekend as she had to be at every showing. He bought a house that weekend, his first time in the area. So don't be insulted.


Jared: I don't need a flyer, I already found the house. I want to see the property. There are licensed cabbies who can take me to the curb, but I still need an agent to let me in.
The issue of a pre-approval letter is (opinion) just something that came about in the credit crunch because you guys are tired of being jerked around by people who can't afford a movie so they go looking at houses.

JR: No, the preapproval letter has been around a long time. It is a way of having people prove they can afford a house (everyone says "I'm paying cash" in order to get around it, but a MOTIVATED BUYER gets a letter saying he has the cash). Jared, believe it or not, there are a lot of unmotivated buyers around. We "convince" our clients to hire us because we are only going to bring MOTIVATED BUYERS, not a lot of lookers. Our clients want to move "as soon as possible", NOT in the next 2 or 3 years. If you don't want to move in as soon as possible, then you aren't the buyer for this listing. You seem very insulted by that, and every once in a while someone gets their panties in a wad because we ask questions to determine motivation. Sometimes they even go around us directly to our clients who back us up because WE ARE DOING OUR JOBS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Now you comment:
You completely dodged the question. but I assume you mean. "I don't do open houses, that is a waste of my time as a full service agent." I would love for a few agents to give me a real answer to this question. I understand that my market is tough and would like to know how other agents handle open houses for clients.

JR: Well Jared, you know what happens when you ASSume, don't you?
I occasionally do open houses, usually my partner does them, or I give an agent who has no listings a chance to do one, because open houses is where you get customers. I would rather work with my listings, and find when I have too many customers I can't serve my seller clients as well. Sometimes I'm out with a customer on a weekend and then comes a sign call "can I see this house?" And oh my it's from you, you want to see my listings and here I am out with customers! That can't be possible, I have to be on call for Jared!

I have organized open house tours in my office, usually on holiday weekends. I've coordinated advertising, drawn maps to distribute to direct people to the other opens. I've sold three of my own listings at open houses recently, so even though they are generally a "waste of time", as you say, if they are set up correctly they can be successful. There is also such a thing as a fluke and luck. 99% of the time you need to bring a good book, or hope they have a 52 inch plasma TV and good movies.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Jul 7, 2008
Sylvia, I'm on my way shortly. Posts between 6:45 and 6:45 could be company time, but since we work on a contract without designated breaks, reasonable breaks are allowed. It was an unappropriate, but fair question.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Jul 7, 2008
The most important response I have should be first.
The Rotach's have discussed what they expect of their listing agent. This is wonderful. No sarcasm, I hope all sellers do this.
JR responded to my how often are you houses open with, "Jared, do I tell you how to do your job? [I should hope not, or nobody's lights would work.] Perhaps you should get a license because you seem to know our business better than all of us."
You completely dodged the question. but I assume you mean. "I don't do open houses, that is a waste of my time as a full service agent." I would love for a few agents to give me a real answer to this question. I understand that my market is tough and would like to know how other agents handle open houses for clients.

Many people seem to think I'm not ready to buy. This is incorrect. Prices here have finally dropped and I'm completely ready. I just do not have to sacrifice quality for speed. I find this response especially aggressive and annoying because half of you said you regularly work for clients for YEARS. I'm trying to save that trouble for a buyers agent. I understand that my opinion on pre-approval is a hitch, but other than that, it sounds like you just want a quick sale.
Chris commented to Cindy that statistics suggest that people purchase closer to ten houses in their lifetime than 2 houses. That's a wonderful sentiment for thought, but the statistics on how much money people save and the average net worth of people are depressing. Just because other people do it doesn't make it a good Idea. Maybe, if they chose a home carefully, they wouldn't move in 3 to 5 years. Most of these idiots also never own their home since statistically it takes 3 years to pay off the closing and financing costs on your average mortgage. Plus 2 (the first two) you spent paying off the Realtors commission when you sell it. Thats 5 years. All based on lousy statistics and now smart buying.

Next. "I'm looking for an agent to work for me on my terms." Yes! Working for me usually entails doing it on my terms. I didn't sign a contract saying you couldn't walk away, but just the opposite. It seems all too many realtors can't remember where the money comes from. Just because the NAR thinks your worth 6% doesn't mean buyers Automatically want to carry a not on your comission. You are sales people and your first sale should be to the person you want to hire you. Only one buyer has opposed the basic Idea that a Listing Realtor should show the home to an interested buyer. The only hitch I have here is the pre-approval letter, and that is not a big deal for most buyers.
Deborah said, "Your comment about not valuing our staff shows how much you don't understand. We have buyer agents call our staff and ask them specific questions about the property. One of the big consumer complaints in real estate is that when they call an office, the person who helps them on the phone so often has never been to the property, and can only read to them what is on the sheet." The first sentence attacks my response. The second sentence could have been my response. It sounds to me like this is "one of your big consumer complaints in real estate," as you put it. You told me I could call and ask specific questions. Can they answer: "Will my daugters crib go on that east wall?" How about, "Does the house feel like it was put together well and is well maintained without crooked cabinets and loose bannisters?" They just tell me what's on the sheet. The sheet may be longer, but they can't show me the house.
Fred commented, "You should be able to find an agent to work as your buyer's agent that would be willing to set up an email search for you that automatically emails you information on houses as they hit the market. Don't go on a showing until your are ready to buy, but this will allow you to track the market when you are. " This is good advise. You people still can't differentiate ready from necessity, but it's good advice. I had this email list with a realtor before, but trulia provides clearer more usable information for basic preliminary searching (or it did before people stopped listing regularly.)
Then he said, "If you don't want a buyer's agent, and you are not ready to buy, why would any agent want to spend their time and gas with you? Agents get paid commission, do you work for free at your job?"
Again we come the the ready to buy comment, but the answer to this shoud be from the listing agents perspective. You should want to spend the time and gas to sell the clients house. That is what you get paid to do. Sell houses. I don't pay a commision as a buyer. You make that abundantly clear every time I talk to one of you. Sell the person paying you's house!
0 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Jul 7, 2008
Just happened upon your response on first page of Trulia voice, so, are you working for the power company now or are you blogging at company time? None of my business of course, but just curious?
0 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Jul 7, 2008
Sylvia Barry,…, Real Estate Pro in Marin County, CA
MVP'08
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Let me try to get caught up, and the first comment is ironically apropriate:
Don stated, "To prove my point....you started this rant yesterday at 2:51 and were up answering this thread as late as almost midnight. Today, you are up at dawn, at it again. "
I started this tread at 2:51 (AM) and continually stayed up at night responding. Yes! I am working the night shift right now. I'm in the power industry and we don't turn the power off at night.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Jul 7, 2008
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