General Area in New Paltz>Question Details

Hendrick Moy, Home Buyer in New Paltz, NY

why are taxes so high in new paltz?

Asked by Hendrick Moy, New Paltz, NY Tue Jul 14, 2009

we have to extra for waste removal, the school system is good, but not GREAT, and there isn't really any public transportation besides the new loop buses...

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Another major reason why taxes are so high in New Paltz is because we are a town/village which has actively taken measures to keep many large businesses (mainly chains and franchises, like Lowe's, Taco Bell, and Walmart, etc) out of our tax district. We've done this because many people here like to keep that "small town" feel--it encourages diversity and it helps smaller, local business owners to have a chance to thrive. Our town planning board has operated in this sort of way for a long time.

Though most locals appreciate the benefits of this situation, the price we pay for this vibrant small-town environment comes in the form of higher taxes for the residents. Q: Why is that? A: Usually, large national/multinational corporations make large contributions to the municipal coffers, first "buying their way in" to be allowed to develop and open their storefronts, then through relatively larger sums of taxes paid on their massive revenues. Our comparatively smaller, more local businesses, do not pay as much tax to the village/town, but in the end more of the money spent in New Paltz stays in New Paltz, getting spent again in New Paltz.

People who prioritize low taxes (and the massive parking lots and corporate sprawl that comes with it) over what many of us deem a higher quality of life generally make their homes nearby in Kingston, Newburgh, Poughkeepsie, or another small town that may not be quite as vibrant. Life is all about tradeoffs...
1 vote Thank Flag Link Thu Apr 19, 2012
The assessed value is supposedly equal to the fair market value minus the applied equalization rate. Now since you bought the home for $'s and it was an arm's length transaction, meaning no one was under duress to buy or sell and it was not a foreclosure or sale to a relative, it is considered fair market value.
The best evidence of this would be the current appraisal from the bank you received when applying for the loan. If you paid cash then I suggest you get an appraisal. Bring that appraisal with you to the assessor's office and you should be able to convince her that together with the appraisal value and the actual purchase price you paid the fair market value and that is what you should be taxed on.
This is a very short explanation and full details can be explained by a person who does these types of grievances for a living. I can provide you with a contact if you decide to continue. Although I am a broker owner of a realty company I myself have done this successfully four times. You can contact me at 845-255-0019.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Sat Jul 25, 2009
Taxes are so high because there is too much duplication of services among the village and town, and because so much property in town is off the tax roles. SUNY, Mohonk Preserve, Historic Huguenot Street, etc. are all great community resources but as costs keep rising, they're part of the reason the burden keeps rising disproportionately on those of us who do pay property taxes.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Fri Mar 12, 2010
We currently rent in New Paltz, and are moving into a single family home. Just never realized that taxes were so high as renters... since we are buying a house at a price that is WAY lower than that which it was assessed (265K vs 320K), we will definitely grieve our taxes. might you have any idea as to how much we can grieve it down?
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Jul 21, 2009
Hi Hendrick,
New Paltz is beautiful. Did you try to grieve your taxes? Have you tried looking in other areas in Ulster?

K.Ryan
Associate Broker with Houlihan Lawrence Real Estate
kryan@houlihanlawrence.com
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Jul 14, 2009
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