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Sherrycallow…, Other/Just Looking in 95391

After graduating, I want to become a real estate Agent. Where would be the best place for relocating?

Asked by Sherrycalloway1, 95391 Sun Apr 8, 2012

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John - I agree! I moved to San Diego from Berlin, Germany and noticed immediately the weather was slightly better.
When it comes to real estate markets, San Diego has a wide range of them just as any other big city. I started my career at a Century 21 office in Mission Valley and was surprised that very few agents actually worked the area - most of them focused on downtown, Mission Hills Kensington, or Hillcrest. But I think the good money is where you are in the north county coastal area. And the traffic is better.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Tue Apr 10, 2012
San Diego is a great market - I lived there for many years before moving north. As a bit of San Diego trivia, the name "America's Finest City" was coined by former mayor Pete Wilson (later governor and senator) when San Diego was passed over as the site for the 1972 Republican National Convention. He was trying to save the city's reputation.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Tue Apr 10, 2012
John offers a lot of great perspectives - I for one think a call to John would be worth your time! I also think calling at least 4-5 companies and brokers you connect with is recommended. Call John - and see if America's Finest City is right for you!
1 vote Thank Flag Link Tue Apr 10, 2012
A smart guy once said, "If you want to make a lot of money, get a job that pays a lot of money." You are in a very advantagous position to do just that. In your position, here is what I'd consider doing:
1) Make a list of the top 10 most expensive real estate markets in California
2) Begin looking for a mentor starting with the most expensive market, working your way down from the top
Use whatever contacts you have or **can make** to find a mentor in the most expensive market possible. It doesn't matter if the mentor is working alone out of his basement or with a big franchise office. You don't want TRAINING, that's for monkeys. You want MENTORING, which involves hands-on real world experience on real transactions under the supervision of a qualified and committed mentor.
Everyone starts out poor and hungry in any job. You have the choice to start out in a market where your income potential can be very low or very high. I recommend you consider shooting for very high. It's just as easy to find a mentor in a market where you can make a great living as it is to find a mentor in a market where your income will be relatively limited.
1 vote Thank Flag Link Sun Apr 8, 2012
John, I remember good ole Pete. Whatever he did it worked. For my particular lifestyle San Diego is still the greatest place overall to live and I spent most of my young life in Newport Beach. After 32 years in North County I can't fathom ever living anywhere else.

You can travel just about anywhere in the World and thoroughly enjoy the experience. But returning back to beautiful SD is like returning to a perpetual vacation.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Apr 10, 2012
First define, your lifestyle. Do you like to surf, walk on sandy beaches, river raft, mountain bike, road bike, back packing, rock climbing, etc. Or do you prefer walking city streets, night clubbing, concerts, fine dining, wine tasting, plays, art, etc. Your home is where your heart is and your heart is where your home is. Do you like snow? Or do you like warm arid weather? Perhaps coastal fog mixed with mid morning to afternoon sun whence you'd love a coastal lifestyle.

Figure out what really hits your hot button. The things you like and are passionate about you can't help but emote and pass along to others with your enthusiasm and intensity which can be very contagious and intoxicating to the folks around you.

If you really like being around a lot of people selling real estate in the middle of a rural farming community in Iowa would not bode well for you. Likewie if you can't stand crowds, traffice, city noise, etc. a downtown environ would drive you nuts.

Now if you like all the above once again "America's Finest City" gives you the best of all Worlds. It has a little bit of everything for everyone and I guarantee you won't find yourself getting bored anytime soon. Good luck.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Apr 10, 2012
Sherry,

Since success in real estate can be tied to name recognition and knowledge of an area relocating may not be the answer to beginning a new career. Quite possibly, the answer to your question is in your own back yard.....

Good luck,

Bill
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Apr 10, 2012
Sherry,

It really depends on your situation. Do you have money saved up to live on your own until you make your first sale(s)? Many find that it takes a year or two to start getting a steady flow of commission checks coming in...and I echo other's remarks. If you don't have excess funds, living with family can help you succeed quicker and cut down on costs. Your first year will probably be $2k in fees just to be able to operate as a Realtor and that's before signs, advertising, marketing, and GAS.

John provides some great advice...I had a chance when I was selling real estate in VA to join the team of an office colleague that was #1 RE/MAX agent in the world from 1999-2003. I still kick myself for not doing that (even though it would have been a temporary cut in pay).

Best of luck and keep in touch after you make a profile on here!

Felix
0 votes Thank Flag Link Tue Apr 10, 2012
"America's Finest City" I'll let you explore that. When you do give me a call.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Apr 9, 2012
Sherry,
Read John's advise again slowly. IT IS GOLDEN!

Looking at the business from 20 years up the experience ladder, what John says, weather it makes sense to you now or not, should not be dismissed.

1) top 10 most expensive real estate markets in California

2) Begin looking for a mentor Use whatever contacts you have or **can make** to find a mentor. It doesn't matter if the mentor is working alone out of his basement or with a big franchise office.
You don't want TRAINING, that's for monkeys. You want MENTORING.

As you will become aware, less than 10% of newly minted real estate agents will see their 2nd year anniversary. All their money will have been given to others selling success strategies or secret weapon, must have tools. They will have fallen into the monkey trap, and let training become a substitute for earning. This is a business, not a hobby. If you are serious about your future, study #2 and take the correct action. Someone has offered you an opportunity, you need to see it.

There is no business on the face of the earth like real estate, You have chosen well.
Best of success to you,
Annette Lawrence
Broker/associate
ReMax Realtec Group
Palm Harbor, Fl
727. 420. 4041
0 votes Thank Flag Link Mon Apr 9, 2012
Hi Sherry,

Well you will have a better chance to succeed if you choose a large city to work in. Just my sheer volume you will have more potential clients then in a small town. Go with Los Angeles for a really diverse and exciting area to work in!
Best of Luck to you!
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sun Apr 8, 2012
Tough question to answer.....

Where do you want to live -- and will you have a support system while you build yourself as a realtor? And if you still want to relocate, make sure you have your finances in order: enough reserves to live on for 6 months to a year because it may take that long before one closes the first transaction....

You can choose to work with a company who can help provide you with the training you'll need to be a realtor, and perhaps help you get started with a few leads. Some companies charge for this training, but it's worth it so that you are prepared and knowledgeable. There are always new things to learn -- like working with distressed properties (short sales, foreclosures). Some have TEAMS -- where you can get the guidance of a mentor and the hands-on experience working on accounts alongside other team mates who can also help you.

You'll pay for membership in your local MLS board, for your MLS lockbox key, business cards, etc. Do you have a suitable vehicle? Remember that your insurance for that vehicle would change if you use it for business. The start up expenses can be voluminous.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sun Apr 8, 2012
Not knowing an area is like getting a cab driver that does not speak your language. Buyers and sellers both want to know you have knowledge in the area, experience and can get the job done professionally. Just starting out, in a totally new and unfamiliar area, sounds like a really difficult idea. When I started I had lived and worked in sales in the area for 8-10 years so I knew the area and had sales experience. One question almost all buyers will ask you is, "Where do you live and how long?" Another is, "How long have you been selling real estate?" Until you can give them a good answer on both you will find real estate sales much harder than you think it will be. Looks easy, sounds like fun but it's not. If you must move to a new area, find a team to learn from and get experience for a year or two. Also, getting your license in Calf will not do you much good if you move to Iowa.
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sun Apr 8, 2012
Becoming a real estate agent is perhaps one of the careers that is hardest, however looks easiest when not involved. My advice, live with your family if possible, because especially starting out, you will have extraordinary expenses and limited to no incoming for a long while. Its a long road, does't work for most, works for some.

Good luck with everything:)
0 votes Thank Flag Link Sun Apr 8, 2012
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