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By The Cascade Team Real Estate | Broker in Issaquah, WA
  • Survey: Buyers Will Pay More for Good Schools

    Posted Under: Schools, Home Buying, Home Selling  |  July 30, 2013 1:43 PM  |  913 views  |  No comments

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    Daily Real Estate News | Tuesday, July 30, 2013

    More than 44 percent of home buyers who plan to buy a home within the next two years said they would be willing to go over their budget by up to 10 percent in order to buy in their preferred school boundaries, according to a new survey by realtor.com®. 

    Three out of five home buyers surveyed said that school boundaries greatly impact their home purchasing decision. Nearly 9 percent of buyers indicated that they’d be willing to pay 11 to 20 percent above their budget to get a home in a desirable school district, the survey found. About 17 percent of buyers said they want to live within a mile of a school so their children can walk there.

    Some home buyers said they’d even be willing to trade certain home amenities for good schools: About 62 percent said they’d give up a pool or spa, 50 percent would give up accessibility to shopping, and nearly 44 percent would pass on a bonus room.

    “Our survey demonstrates the large impact school boundaries have on those looking to purchase a home,” says Barbara O’Connor, chief marketing officer at Move Inc.

    The survey comes after realtor.com® launched a new mobile school search tool in April, allowing buyers to search for listings in specific school and district boundaries.

    Source: realtor.com®

    The Cascade Team Real Estate

  • C21 Allows Buyers to Search for Homes by Schools

    Posted Under: General Area, Quality of Life, Schools  |  July 19, 2013 11:45 AM  |  1,003 views  |  No comments

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    Daily Real Estate News | Friday, July 19, 2013

    Buyers often rank quality schools as an important factor in their home search. Century 21 recently announced that it has added a “search by schools” function to its Web site, century21.com, so buyers can have an easier time finding a home within specific school boundaries.

    Buyers can search schools by location in a state, county, city, or near a street address. They can refine their school/home search by student-teacher ratios, grade levels, public, private, or charter school types. Users can set listing alerts, in which they would receive a notification if a home in their desired school district comes on the market. The site also offers a list of top-rated schools.

    “Selecting the right school is an important part of the decision to buy a home,” says Bev Thorne, Century 21 Real Estate LLC chief marketing officer. “We have now made the search easier by delivering data to consumers precisely as they want it.”                           

    Source: Century 21

    The Cascade Team Real Estate

  • America's best high schools, 2013

    Posted Under: General Area, Schools, Home Buying  |  May 25, 2013 5:42 PM  |  1,011 views  |  No comments
    The School for the Talented and Gifted in Dallas has again been named the best public high school in the nation by U.S. News.

    U.S. News/Photo - The School for the Talented and Gifted in Dallas has again been named the best public high school in the nation by U.S. News.

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    The importance of a strong high school education cannot be overstated.

    Good schools challenge students academically, while giving them ample opportunity to explore their interests. This combination can set teens up to succeed long after graduation. By contrast, subpar schools can leave students struggling to make the transition from high school to college or the workforce.

    The 2013 Best High Schools rankings, released April 23, 2013, can help parents wade through the ever expanding options of public high schools. U.S. News collected data on more than 21,000 public high schools from 49 states and the District of Columbia. (Nebraska did not report enough data to be included in the rankings.)

    U.S. News joined forces with the American Institutes for Research, a D.C.-based organization, to evaluate schools on overall student performance on state-mandated assessments, as well as how effectively schools educated their black, Hispanic and economically disadvantaged students. Performance on Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate exams was then used to determine the degree to which schools prepare students for college-level work.

    Schools were ranked within each state, as well as on a national stage, so families can see how their public high school stacked up against rivals within the community and across the country. In the national rankings, 500 schools earned gold medals, 1,790 were awarded silver and 2,515 took home bronze.

    The School for the Talented and Gifted in the Dallas Independent School District retained its distinction as the best public high school in the country. BASIS Tucson, in Arizona, climbed the ranks from No. 6 to claim the No. 2 spot, replacing Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology in Virginia, which fell to fourth. The International School in Washington held onto its No. 9 ranking.

    Six schools made significant gains to join the top 10 this year. The biggest movers were Gwinnett School of Mathematics, Science and Technology in Georgia and BASIS Scottsdale in Arizona. Both schools opened their doors during the 2007-2008 school year, and each made a big splash with its first full graduating class, moving from no numerical rank to third and fifth, respectively.

    Pine View School in Florida climbed 24 spots to stake its claim as the No. 6 ranked public high school in the country, and Loveless Academic Magnet Program High School in Alabama followed suit, jumping from No. 32 to No. 7. Biotechnology High School in New Jersey (No. 8) and Academic Magnet High School in South Carolina (No. 10) also joined the top-ranked high schools, gaining nine and 17 places, respectively.

    While the top 10 public high schools are peppered across nine different states, California leads the pack with close to 28 percent of the nearly 1,800 eligible schools in the state earning gold and silver medals. Maryland followed with roughly 26 percent of the 226 medal-eligible schools in the state designated as gold and silver.

    Nearly 41 percent of the gold medal schools across the country receive Title I funding, federal funds that support low-income students. Almost 70 percent of the top 500 schools are located in or near large cities.

    Charter and magnet schools, which typically accept a limited number of students either through a lottery or application process, accounted for 145 of the top 500 schools. Because these schools tend to have flexible curriculums and draw upon a narrower swath of students – magnet schools in particular use a competitive process to draw the more academically gifted students – U.S. News also ranked these programs separately.

    BASIS Tucson, Gwinnett and BASIS Scottsdale topped the Best Charter Schools rankings, with Pacific Collegiate School in California and International Studies Charter High School in Florida rounding out the top five.

    Loveless Academic Magnet and Academic Magnet High School topped the Best Magnet Schools rankings, followed by the Maine School of Science and Mathematics in third and Carnegie Vanguard High School in Texas taking fourth. Michigan's International Academy claimed the No. 5 spot.

    10. Academic Magnet High School North Charleston, SC Gold medal

    9. International School Bellevue, WA Gold medal

    8. Biotechnology High School Freehold, NJ Gold medal

    7. Loveless Academic Magnet Program High School Montgomery, AL Gold medal

    6. Pine View School Osprey, FL Gold medal

    5. BASIS Scottsdale Scottsdale, AZ Gold medal

    4.Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology Alexandria, VA Gold medal

    3. Gwinnett School of Mathematics, Science and Technology Lawrenceville, GA Gold medal

    2. BASIS Tucson Tucson, AZ Gold medal

    1. School for the Talented and Gifted Dallas, TX Gold medal

    Community & School Reports

    The Cascade Team Real Estate has made it easier than ever to learn more about your Seattle or San Diego neighborhood…including the schools that are located in your area of interest.

    Explore community and school information within Western Washington or San Diego County. The Cascade Team community and school reports are your local source for local demographic and school district information. Compare local demographics, neighbohood amenities and local schools.

    Our Cascade Team Real Estate Community & School Report Tool:

    • Compare two zip codes side by side
    • See income, household, cost of living and climate information
    • See local shopping, restaurants, services, recreation and leisure, along with local grocery stores.
    • Compare local public and private schools
    • See information about local schools and compare them side by side.
    • Select individual schools to review and see their scores, teacher ratios and school profile

    To view all this valuable information, just click on either the Community Zip Search or School Zip Search images below.

    Community Information and Comparison

    School Information and Comparison

    School Report - Information Sample

    school-reports_400

    The Cascade Team Real Estate

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    Simply Outrageous Service! Not Outrageous Commissions!

  • Back 2 School Reports: Compare Local Schools Side by Side - Even Private

    Posted Under: General Area, Schools, Home Buying  |  August 13, 2012 10:02 AM  |  990 views  |  No comments

    Community & School Reports

    The Cascade Team Real Estate has made it easier than ever to learn more about your Seattle or San Diego neighborhood…including the schools that are located in your area of interest.

    Explore community and school information within Western Washington or San Diego County. The Cascade Team community and school reports are your local source for local demographic and school district information. Compare local demographics, neighbohood amenities and local schools.

    Our Cascade Team Real Estate Community & School Report Tool:

    • Compare two zip codes side by side
    • See income, household, cost of living and climate information
    • See local shopping, restaurants, services, recreation and leisure, along with local grocery stores.
    • Compare local public and private schools
    • See information about local schools and compare them side by side.
    • Select individual schools to review and see their scores, teacher ratios and school profile

    To view all this valuable information, just click on either the Community Zip Search or School Zip Search images below.

    Community Information and Comparison

    School Information and Comparison

    School Report - Information Sample

    school-reports_400

    If you have questions about a particular neighborhood or school, have one of our local agents assist you in your search and find the best fit.

    The Cascade Team Real Estate

    logo-outrageous_120

    Simply Outrageous Service! Not Outrageous Commissions!

  • Community & School Reports any State

    Posted Under: Schools, Home Buying, In My Neighborhood  |  January 6, 2012 7:45 AM  |  1,265 views  |  No comments

    Community & School Reports

    The Cascade Team Real Estate has made it easier than ever to learn more about your Seattle or San Diego neighborhood…including the schools that are located in your area of interest.

    Explore community and school information within Western Washington or San Diego County. The Cascade Team community and school reports are your local source for local demographic and school district information. Compare local demographics, neighbohood amenities and local schools.

    Our Cascade Team Real Estate Community & School Report Tool:

    • Compare two zip codes side by side
    • See income, household, cost of living and climate information
    • See local shopping, restaurants, services, recreation and leisure, along with local grocery stores.
    • Compare local public and private schools
    • See information about local schools and compare them side by side.
    • Select individual schools to review and see their scores, teacher ratios and school profile

    To view all this valuable information, just click on either the Community Zip Search or School Zip Search images below.

    Community Information and Comparison

    School Information and Comparison

    School Report - Information Sample

    school-reports_400

  • Mercer Island School District ranks #2 Nation Wide!

    Posted Under: Schools, Home Buying, Home Selling  |  April 26, 2011 9:31 AM  |  1,429 views  |  No comments

    The best cities to live and learn 2011

    Looking for a great school? You might be surprised where you'll find it.

    By Carol Lloyd

    "Zip code equals destiny."

    In an era when almost everything about American education is a matter of intense debate, it's rare to find a truism which so few people dispute. But is the equation between big money and good schools really so inviolable? This year as we surveyed our data about American cities with the most consistently high-performing schools, we noticed some intriguing — and sometimes surprising — results.

    Educational sweet spot

    Contrary to conventional wisdom, the very best cities for public schooling are not those whose streets are rolling with Rolls. The winning cities in our top 10 list don't have the highest median home prices: not those in the $800,000-plus, $600,000-plus, nor even $400,000-plus ranges. The real shocker? The highest number of top-scoring cities for public schooling were in fact found on our $200,000-$399,999 list: Falmouth, ME (ranked 1# nationwide), Barrington, RI (#4) and Bedford, NH (#5).

    Anomalies of greatness? Hardly. In fact, the $100,000-$199,999 list had some serious contenders, too. Pella, IA (median home price: $148,200) ranked 3rd nationwide; St. John's, FL ($181,700) ranked 8th.

    It’s not that many well-heeled areas don’t have great schools. Mercer Island, WA (#2 nationwide, median home price of $708,740) and Manhattan Beach, CA (#7, median home price $1,278,980) are just two examples of towns where superlative learning and affluence go hand in hand. Yet as the lackluster performance of many upscale towns across the country proves, deep parental pockets are no assurance of an area’s exceptional public schools.

    So where is the educational sweet spot? Wherever the impassioned middle class puts down roots. These are the towns, suburbs and cities across America where families consistently, and somewhat forcefully, support their local schools — come budget crisis or political battle. This kind of education-loving populace tends to multiply, attracting like-minded families to move there, too.

    Of course, many of this year's top-ranking cities seem affordable when compared to say, New York City, but they are prosperous relative to their regions. For instance, though Barrington, RI has a median home price of $269,010 (compared to humble Queens, NY, at $450,249), it's an affluent suburb of Providence, attracting academics and professionals who work in the city. In a similar fashion, cities like Bedford, NH,or Falmouth, ME,tend to attract a quorum of college-educated parents — a strong predictor for the success of any school district.

    What, then, can we learn from these top education towns? For starters, it’s worth taking note of what we didn't find in our school-district success stories: bleeding-edge, high-tech solutions, billionaire sugar daddies, or teachers whose exertions resemble that of ultra-marathoners. Rather, the educational model followed by our top-rated districts is based on educational practices that aren't so easy to implement, day after day, year after year.

    Teacher mind meld

    There probably isn’t a superintendant in America who won’t extol the virtues of great teacher development and collaboration. But the district serving Barrington, RI (like many on our top 10 list) has systemically implemented these ideals through what's known as "professional learning communities," or PLCs. Typical professional development often consists of lectures or seminars by random experts. PLCs are teacher-centered, problem-solving support groups in which teachers help each other solve real problems with their students. PLCs, which are gaining support from both teachers and administrators, are predicated on the following assumptions: 1) For teachers to feel like professionals, they need a professional community; 2) The best way to improve teaching craft is to help teachers solve real-life problems (How can I get Jessica to stop blowing spit wads?) vs. abstract pedagogical debates (whole language literacy vs. phonics?).

    Patrick Guida, School Committee Chair and parent of two Barrington school graduates, says that adopting the PLC model strengthened an already collaborative culture between Barrington teachers. "We already were following many of these strategies, but since [implementing PLCs], it has assisted us in continuing to support our teachers and making sure every teacher continues to improve."

    Barrington PLCs make time for collaboration so teachers work together planning curriculum, problem solving, and supporting one another. "But perhaps most important," says Guida, "is that it encourages high expectations for the teachers, students, and administration." These high expectations have had tangible — and positive — results for Barrington's high-school kids. Now all the students, not just the high-achievers, are encouraged to consider Advanced Placement courses, for example.

    Setting the bar high, one child at a time

    Faced with a move to the greater Boston area in 1998 as their first child was entering kindergarten, physician William Kassler and his wife "poured over the numbers."

    "We looked at multiple metrics — class size, student-teacher ratio, test scores — and we chose Bedford exclusively for the schools," says Kassler. Although the hamlet near the state capital of Manchester is relatively affluent compared to some neighborhoods nearby, its housing prices (median home price $293,730) are far lower than those in Boston, where Kassler sometimes commutes.

    Twelve years and three children later, Kassler says their choice has been validated "over and over and over." No matter what their issue, Kassler says he found the school system "flexible and responsive." Teachers, administrators, and guidance counselors consistently tailored individual responses to their concerns — whether for an accelerated curriculum or troubleshooting a learning challenge. "We never had to fight or argue for special services."

    When asked if Bedford is yet another pressure cooker for Generation Race to Nowhere, Kassler acknowledges there’s a debate about Bedford’s sky-high expectations. The new high school’s International Baccalaureate program offers what Kassler characterizes as "the best of both worlds": Any student can take advantage of the rigorous program by enrolling in individual classes, while the most driven kids can choose the far more intensive full-time, two-year diploma.

    Seal those cracks

    Another secret to a school district's success? Taking the necessary steps so that all students — particularly those who can so easily fall through the cracks — don't. Though Mark Wittmer, Superintendant of schools in Pella, Iowa, has plenty to showboat about, including ultra-low teacher turnover and consistently excellent student performance despite a relatively low per-pupil expenditure, he’d rather focus on his school’s success with at-risk kids.

    "What I’m most proud of is our how our free-and-reduced lunch students perform. Our kids really do well, whether they are middle class or poor. If you put kids with caring instructors and high expectations, all kids can learn," he says. "But it’s easy to talk about, and a lot harder to do."

    Indeed, like every other superintendant of an exceptional school district told us, making sure to catch and help every at-risk learner requires multiple approaches. Wittmer offers a recipe that includes many ingredients: early intervention programs for struggling learners, a STEM (Science, Ttechnology, Engineering and Math) program called Project Lead the Way, and a commitment to continual improvement. "We're not married to test scores," says Superintendent Wittmer. "We want to produce independent thinkers and tests don’t always measure that. But it's a difficult balance. Do we move away from what we’re held accountable to [i.e. testing] in order to explore other things?"

    Learning through data

    In an era where standardized testing looms as the enemy of meaningful learning, it’s gratifying to see some districts attempting to use tests as a tool of enlightenment rather than a blunt political cudgel.

    "We try to be result-oriented," says Guida, the Barrington, RI's School Committee Chair. "We believe that there’s far more to student learning than testing. But at the end of the day, we also believe that our student performance is a material consideration."

    In Barrington, it’s not about once-a-year high-stakes testing — quite the opposite. Every four weeks, teachers administer "formative assessments" to see if their kids are actually learning the material they're being taught. “This serves as a barometer for the teachers and the students to learn whether the students are getting the knowledge," explains Guida. "Based on the results, teachers get together and huddle up and focus on where the adjustments need to be made."

    Thinking globally

    All the great school districts we researched left no rock unturned in attempting to keep struggling learners from falling through the cracks and pushing super students to scale new heights. They all used data in smart ways. And all emphasized the importance of teacher collaboration, professionalism, and commitment.
    Not surprisingly, Falmouth, ME, our top-ranked town nationwide, is committed to all of the above. The town also does something more: Falmouth maintains a focus on what many might say is the ultimate purpose of education. Not to develop  high-achieving, self-involved teens, but thoughtful, engaged young adults.

    When asked what makes her school district excel, Falmouth Superintendant Barbara Powers praises her teachers, the early-intervention program, the entire community that participates in a 18-24 month school planning process, as well as the full arts, music, performing-arts curriculum, and Spanish instruction starting in the first grade.

    "But what am I proudest of?" says Powers. "I'd have to say it's our service learning program." Many schools have components of service learning, but Falmouth takes the job of teaching citizenship seriously. (Other notably globally minded school districts include Jericho, NY, Belmont, MA and North Royalton, OH.) The program begins in the early grades and culminates in high school with a 30-hour community service project.

    "Our service-learning includes everything from visits to local seniors, to a team working with Habitat for Humanity in Mississippi for a week, to travelling to Guatemala to work with Safe Passages," Powers explains."We want to raise global citizens."

  • Snoqualmie Valley School Bond Issues

    Posted Under: General Area in Washington, Schools in Washington, Market Conditions in Washington  |  January 24, 2011 3:11 PM  |  1,405 views  |  No comments

    Response to Jan 21 Email

    It came to our attention that a resident of North Bend, Mr. David Spring, distributed an email recently – in which he accuses the school district of lies and deceit. His email contained a number of points, which attempt to provide “evidence” for his views. Unfortunately, most of these points are either false or misleading.  Here are some responses:

    1. Mr. Spring believes that Mount Si High School needs an immediate $100 million remodel – to essentially raise up the entire school to avoid destruction during a “MEGA flood at Mount Si High School due to the to impact of Global Warming on the Upper Snoqualmie Valley” (from “Assessing the Risk of a Mega Flood at Mount Si High School” by David Spring, Jan 5, 2011). Mr. Spring believes the school district is hiding this information from us.

      There is no credible evidence of either an impending “mega-flood”, or that MSHS would be “destroyed”. The $100 million remodel project he claims is being hidden from us, is actually a discarded alternative once considered for this bond proposition – which you can read about in the Long-Term Facilities Committee final report to the school board.  This was the so-called “tear down & build up two stories” plan, and was indeed estimated to cost nearly $100 million. For the 2011 bond, the school board instead chose the much more cost-effective plan of annexing nearby Snoqualmie Middle School instead.
       
    2. Mr. Spring claims that it would cost less to operate TWO separate high schools than to operate one high school with a 9th-grade campus across the street (the current plan).   Common sense tells you this cannot possibly be true.  2 principals? 2 sets of counselors? 2 sets of teachers for every subject? 2 athletic programs? 2 music programs?  It’s clearly a LOT less expensive to run one high school, even if the 9th grade teachers move across the street to a different building.
       
    3. Mr. Spring claims the District is using 8% per year growth to calculate future enrollment needs. This is FALSE.  The District’s enrollment forecasts show student enrollment growing at an average of 3% per year – consistent with ACTUAL growth seen since 2008. 

      Please refer to the published enrollment forecast charts in the District’s current FAQ:
      http://svsd410.org/districtinfo/bondprojects/2010-11/2011BondFAQ.pdf

      Perhaps Mr. Spring is mistakenly referring to outdated enrollment projections from before the recession and real-estate market crash in 2008.  At that point the District was seeing ACTUAL growth of 6-7% per year.  That high growth rate was a main reason why a 2nd high school was proposed back in 2006-7. The current reduced forecasts are a main reason why a 2nd high school is NOT needed any longer.
       
    4. Mr. Spring claims the District is under-reporting the number of classrooms at Mount Si High School (43 vs his count of 52 classrooms). It seems Mr. Spring is mistakenly counting dedicated special-use rooms (computer labs, video labs, music, special-ed programs) as general-purpose classrooms. Special-purpose rooms are not counted when reporting building capacity. It’s true that the school *could* convert computer labs or other rooms to general-purpose classrooms in an emergency overcrowding situation – but that’s obviously not “normal” capacity.
       
    5. Mr. Spring claims the average cost of a new high school in WA State is only $31 million. This is very far from true. In fact, the full-size high schools built in the last couple years have averaged $80-$100 million total project costs.  Unfortunately Mr. Spring has seriously misinterpreted the data he is basing his claim on. 

      First – he’s claiming an AVERAGE using costs going back to 2001. School construction costs have risen more than 50% since 2001. These numbers have to be adjusted for inflation to have any meaning for an “average” or comparison.

      Second – the costs in his table are only a PRO-RATED PORTION of the full costs of building these schools. Specifically they are the costs for the “Matchable Sq. Feet” portion of the school building – that’s just the portion of the project that qualifies for state matching funds.

      Third – these costs do not include design, engineering, site preparation/mitigation, permits, legal fees, sales tax, furniture, fixtures, or equipment. These so-called “soft” project costs normally total at least 30% of the “hard” construction bid cost.
       
    6. Mr. Spring bases almost all of his arguments on his unique interpretation of our state constitution: he believes the state is required to pay much – if not all – of the costs of local school construction. He believes all we have to do is SUE the state legislature, and we will then get at least half of our school construction costs paid for.  While we agree with Mr. Spring that we’d like the state to pay more – wishful thinking is not going to solve our problems.

      Mr. Spring further claims that “No other school district in our State has ever been asked to build a high school, or even a middle school, without State matching funds”.  As evidence – he points to a state table listing school construction projects, and seems astonished that ALL of them received some kind of state matching funds.  Well, no surprise here. The table he’s referring to lists only State-Matched school construction projects. By definition it doesn’t list any school projects that didn’t qualify for state funds. (Note: none of our recent new school projects appear in this list – because they didn’t qualify for state aid. Mr. Spring appears to have manually added our district’s schools to this list in his version of the table, to make it appear that we are the only district being singled out).

      In reality, Washington State’s School Construction Assistance Program (aka “matching funds”) is a relatively small, under-funded program. The most important thing to know about the program is that it provides matching funds.  School districts get NOTHING if they do not pass their bond first.

      Second, this program is forced to prioritize. Most of its limited budget goes to 1) “poor” school districts and 2) replacement or modernization of aging school buildings at least 30 years old. New school construction in relatively “rich” districts (most in Western WA) unfortunately qualifies for little or no matching funds.

      The program is currently funded by the State Legislature at about $750 million over the two-year biennium. That’s a little over $1 million per year, per school district. Just last week the Governor recommended slashing this program to only $500 million for the next 2-year biennium, to as part of ongoing budget-cutting.

      It would be nice if the state did provide more assistance for school construction. The unfortunate reality is – they provide very little today, and will likely provide even less in the future due to budget cuts. 
       
    7. Mr. Spring claims the replacement middle school in the current bond proposition will be “by far the most expensive middle school ever built in our State”.  Once again, he’s completely misinterpreted the data he’s basing this on – and seriously underestimated the actual costs of these schools. See #5 above.  In general, due to inflation alone, the *newest* schools tend to be “the most expensive ever”.  The estimated cost of the replacement SMS project is in line with similar projects across the area.
       
    8. Mr. Spring makes unfounded characterizations of the Issaquah and Snohomish Freshman campuses as “failures”.  Both were actually very successful programs, which succeeded in raising freshman grade averages, while reducing discipline issues and smoothing transitions to high school.  Both were discontinued for financial reasons, not because of “complaints from parents” as Mr. Spring claims.

      The Snohomish freshman campus successfully ran from 1992 to 2008.  It was located in an aging building that needed to be rebuilt or replaced – and instead they moved the 9th graders into the new, larger Glacier Peak High School when that building opened in 2008.

      The Issaquah freshman campus ran successfully from 2006-2010. It was always planned to be converted back to a middle school after 8-10 years. Overcrowded middle schools and tough financial times forced the Issaquah School District to make this conversion several years earlier than planned.  Issaquah school board member Mike Winkler said "Pacific Cascade has performed beautifully. This is merely based on the need of the overall district. We've had nothing but great comments from the parents who've had kids there." Issaquah passed a bond to expand their two high schools, to provide enough room for all students 9-12.
       
    9. Mr. Spring claims the District is lying when it says that SMS will be converted to a Freshman Campus in 2013, whether or not the bond passes. He claims that state budget cuts will reduce the number of teachers at MSHS to the point where there will be empty classrooms.  This is not true. Mr. Spring has extrapolated a worst-case budget-cut scenario, and made the (incorrect) assumption it will be only MSHS teachers who bear the brunt of any future budget cuts. If budget cuts do happen, in reality they will be spread across all departments and all schools.
       
    10. Mr. Spring tells us we don’t need a FOURTH middle school.  He is absolutely correct. We need THREE middle schools. Snoqualmie Middle School is going away in 2013, and needs to be replaced.  This is either an attempt to mislead people into thinking we will end up with FOUR middle schools, or a complete misunderstanding of this 2011 bond proposal.

    Mr. Spring’s final solution to our problems is to have our school board SUE the state legislature to provide more construction matching funds. He wants us to be a “test case” - and sacrifice our children’s immediate needs for adequate schools, just so he can pursue his long-standing quest for a symbolic but futile lawsuit.

    Mr. Spring wants us to believe that we will get something for nothing. All we have to do is sue the state, he claims, and we’ll magically get half or more of our construction projects paid for.  Then – since we’re only going to pay half-price – Mr. Spring believes we then afford the TWO giant projects that he really wants: building a second comprehensive high school in North Bend, AND a $100 million remodel of Mount Si High school (to avoid global-warming “MEGA-flood” destruction)

    Wishful thinking and passion can be useful – but NOT when they ignore reality, and prevent us from doing the right thing for our kids.

    The Cascade Team Real Estate

    www.TheCascadeTeam.com


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