Home > Blogs > rockinblu's Blog
35,158 views

rockinblu's Blog

By rockinblu | Other/Just Looking in Austin, TX
  • Lies, Damned Lies, and Statistics

    Posted Under: General Area, Home Selling, Agent2Agent  |  March 26, 2011 10:31 AM  |  4,518 views  |  7 comments

    Case in point >>> http://www.trulia.com/blog/httpwwwhalsteadcomagentaspxidJ8L/2011/03/for_sale_by_owner#c69141

    After the stats that the author mentioned were totally de-bunked, she chose to delete the comments, and closed the blog to further discussion. That would be like me posting a blog on how all REALTORS®  intentionally try to mislead the public, and closing it to comments. 

    The following was my respose that was deleted:

    "According to the National Association of Realtors, 86% of For Sale by Owners fail and eventually list with an agent."

    ~~~~~~~

    Total BS. According to the NAR's interpretation of FSBOs and their own stats, which doesn't even include MLS entry only aka flat-fee sellers, FSBOs were responsible for 11% of the sales in 2009.

     

    Now tell me this. How could have only 14% of those who started as FSBOs (NAR's definition) ,  be responsible for 11% of the sales? That would mean that those sellers in 2009 who started as FSBOs would have to have represented more than 78% of all sellers (.11/.14).  Does anyone in their right mind actually believe that almost 8 out of 10 people who sell their houses start out as FSBOs? Give me a break.

     

    It's hard for me to believe you're still throwing out that misleading figure about agent represented properties selling for 25% more, when in fact you don't mention that most high end properties are sold with representation. As you very well know, this obviously skews the numbers dramatically.

     

    You can go ahead and delete this. I've got it copied and pasted in my word processor to re-post.



    She should possibly read the blog attached to the link below, and realize what she's doing to her creditability.
    http://rockinblu-rockinblu.blogspot.com/2010/08/what-am-i-missing-here.html
  • What Am I Missing Here?

    Posted Under: Home Selling  |  January 7, 2009 6:03 PM  |  6,209 views  |  18 comments

    I think many of the agents on Trulia consider me to be anti-agent because of my blog containing information on doing a FSBO. Nothing could be further from the truth. I have posted on Trulia that of the three of my home owning children only one might be a good FSBO candidate. I have previously posted good reasons for using an agent which are below.

    1. Chances are your house will be sold quicker.

    2. Convenience.

    3. Let them take the risk of dealing with strangers while in your home.

    4. Better suited to handle unexpected problems.

    5. Better chance of a properly prepared house for showings.

    I have recommended to posters probably no more than five or ten times to try a FSBO while I have been on Trulia. These instances were of a last resort variety, or issues of sellers wanting to withdraw from the market temporarily. I generally only send posters to my blog when they have already expressed interest in doing a FSBO, or for them to obtain marketing ideas from it to be proactive with their agent. In reality open minded agents should appreciate the blog. There is information in it that could make for a smoother transaction between buyer agent, buyer, and a FSBO.

    To go on further, you will not find one post from me on Trulia or Zillow where I have trashed agents in general. I have never used the words overpaid, worthless, or dishonest in characterizing them. I have never attacked their educational requirements either. However, I do routinely attack those posts from agents that are based on their own twisting of facts that already, in my opinion, have been manipulated or worded in such a manner by the NAR  to be misleading to the general public.

    The following quotes are from two real estate professionals:

    “The information I gave you stating that Realtors tend to get more money is backed by a report done by NAR. Just because someone doesn't agree with the numbers does not make them wrong. And, yes, the report does not give "net" statistics. However, with an average of 32% higher selling price, even deducting the average 6% commission would still net you 26% more money."

    "The median FSBO selling price in 2006 was $187,200, compared with $247,000 for agent-assisted transactions. That’s $59,800 dollars more in the seller’s pocket using a real estate professional (according to realtor.org). Given the numbers, if a Realtor can sell a home for 32 percent more than a For Sale By Owner that in itself is a huge reason to use a Realtor?”

    What am I missing here? Do they actually expect me to believe that if a FSBO sold his house for 150K, a Realtor could have gotten almost 200K? If a FSBO sold for 225K a Realtor could have gotten almost 300K? If a FSBO sold for 300K should a Realtor been able to get almost 400K?

    The obvious answer is they have twisted further a study that indicates that represented sales are, on the average, higher than FSBOs. I think all of us would agree higher priced houses are, in the vast majority, sold agent represented. This would certainly reflect a higher median selling price for agent represented houses. This finding should not be interpreted or distorted to mean that the differential is the difference a FSBO might get versus what an agent could have gotten for that same house. You might even argue that flat-fee FSBOs are not even included as FSBOs in NAR studies. The new line of thinking is that since they have had help from an agent getting on the MLS,  they are not truly FSBOs. I am not even going to bother to post a link to the study that most agents have already seen more than they care to. I could quote from the Sept. 08 Consumer Reports, but I could be considered to be as reliable with my quote as some agents are in their interpretation of some studies. If you want the real thing, you can do as I did. I ordered a back issue through Amazon.

    As far as the agents' reference material from what I can ascertain, it is from the following excerpt from realtor.org:   

    "As for profit — after all is said and done, FSBOs don’t always come out with fatter wallets. Again, the numbers tell the truth. Homes sold with the help of a real estate professional in 2006 sold on average for 32 percent more than FSBO sales. The median FSBO selling price in 2006 was $187,200, compared with $247,000 for agent-assisted transactions."

    Where does it actually state in those few sentences that a FSBO can expect to get 32% more if they had chosen an agent? The article states that FSBOs don't ALWAYS come out with fatter wallets. That's a pretty safe bet just like agents don't ALWAYS net you more money which is probably even safer. 

    The article also gives findings on median home sales stating that numbers tell the truth. I won't argue that part, but nowhere do I see a specific sentence stating "with an average of 32% higher selling price, even deducting the average 6% commission would still net you 26% more money,” or "That's $59,800 dollars more in the seller's pocket using a real estate professional."

    The article has implied something of that nature with carefully worded sentences, but never truly states it. Some agents have simply chosen to take the bait and run with it. I will repeat. The disparity between FSBO sale prices and agent represented sale prices mainly comes from the fact that more high priced home sales are handled with agent representation. Somehow I can't picture Angelina and Brad hammering a FSBO sign into their front yard. 

    Another factor could be that a number of FSBO sales are between family and friends skewing the numbers even more. Also, if these numbers were even remotely correct, and agents can get sellers that much more, what does that say about the effectiveness of buyer agents getting their clients the best price? I'm sorry agents, you can't have it both ways. 

    Another stat I see get bandied about is on FSBOs that give up and go with a Realtor. The last one I saw was 90%. Now please, lets get real for a moment. Lets do the math. Given The 2008 National Association of Realtors® Profile of Home Buyers and Sellers states that 13% of all home sales were FSBOs, and mind you their definition of a FSBO doesn't include any hybrid FSBO on th MLS, that would leave 10% of the original total of "true" FSBOs to account for 13% of the sales. So under that scenario how many original FSBOs would there have been if 90% failed. The NAR reported figure on existing home sales in 2008 was 4,912,000. Given that they also reported 13% were FSBOs ("true") that would make the successful FSBO count 638,560 done by the 10% of non-quitters. To find the total number of FSBOs to have started you would simply divide 638,560 by .10 which means that 6,385,600 would have had to start out as FSBOs. That would be more than the total sales at 130%. So the 90%,or even 80% number some agents like to use simply doesn't stand up. The fact of the matter is no one really knows the correct number. Agents should quit exaggerating the facts. It only draws into question their honesty.

    Agents please take this as constructive criticism. Why don’t you stick to doing what you do best on Trulia. Such as answering questions with great answers, helping each other, and digging up clients and leads. I really think you do a disservice to yourselves and your colleagues when you post information that is intentionally meant to mislead. Isn't the five important issues I addressed earlier in this blog that are honest and true sufficient for you? Why don’t you leave the biased propaganda for the NAR hierarchy. That is what you pay your dues for, along with them keeping the MLS for agents and brokers only, and schmoozing politicians. That’s maybe just my opinion and if I am wrong, what am I missing here?

  • I've Got My Fingers Crossed.

    Posted Under: Home Selling  |  December 25, 2008 3:50 PM  |  12,830 views  |  26 comments
    Well you can do that as well, but thorough agent interviewing is probably much better in landing an agent that will give your house the best chance of selling. The following information that I've compiled from various posts regarding the process hopefully may be of some help.

    First, you should familiarize yourself with the various types of listings >

    http://real-estate.lawyers.com/residential-real-estate/Types-of-Listing-or-Brokerage-Agreements.html

    In choosing a listing agent possibly the first thing I would look for is some letters behind the name. These do lend some sort of creditability. Certainly having a referral to him or her is a plus, but is certainly not a sure thing. The agent that was referred to me by three friends was an absolute disaster. You can take agents that are referred to you that were used during the bubble with a grain of salt. Referrals to those that have been used during the present downturn can be considered much more seriously. Internet referrals by other agents should be scrutinized carefully as well. There have been instances where the referring agent hasn't any real first hand info on the agent referred, and is just looking for a finder's fee. They simply may go by stats that can sometimes be misleading in the overall quality of the agent you were referred to. 

    As far as choosing an agent on your own, drive around your neighborhood and look at signs to find out what brokerages are represented, and look their sites up on the web. Go to the agents roster and select a few. I would try to find the agent's listings on Realtor.com and see whose listings are the best described, and are featured listings with multiple photos and a virtual tour. You might even want to put the addresses of the different agent's listings in a google search. Compare how many websites or google hits you see for each address. The agent with the most sites might indicate a better job of marketing by that particular agent.  Another possible filter search you can use has to do with this link> http://www.trulia.com/voices/directory/Saint_Louis-agent--32844?sort_order=featured . Change the location to the correct one and research those agents listed. Check their profile on how helpful their answers have been. If they seem to consistently provide  easy to understand answers, you certainly might want to put them up for consideration. If their answers seem to be more about self promotion or  NAR statistics, personally I would skip them.  From those that you have narrowed the search down to, use the criteria below. Some of the criteria are obvious, and couple not so much so.

    1. Your call to the agent was answered, or returned in a prompt manner.

    2. The agent showed up on time for the appointment, and was neat and professional in appearance.

    3. Be sure to mention the names of other agents you have talked with, or will be interviewing. If the agent you are interviewing gives any indication that could be interpreted as a knock against the competition, he or she has failed on an important criterion. If, on the other hand, the agent is complimentary about his or her colleagues, that is a plus.

    4. The agent should be prepared with facts and figures, marketing plan, and offer suggestions. When an agent says "This property is perfect. You don't need to do a thing to it," it could very well be a big red flag.
     
    When  making your appointments with the agents who you've decided on interviewing through your internet research ask for them to bring their MLS print out for the past 12 months with them.
    When interviewing the agents, of the four suggested listing price ranges choose between the agents that have the two in the middle. Of those two, choose the agent you felt the most comfortable with after going through the rest of the interview questions. There is a lot to be said about trusting your "gut."

    The reason I disqualified the one with the high suggested price is that it could be a good chance the agent is just giving the info that you want to hear to get your listing. Not a very honest practice. I threw out the low, based on the possibility that this agent is just looking for a easy and quick sale at your expense. However, easy and quick are not adjectives normally found used in this market. If all four or even three suggested prices would come in extremely close, just go with the agent that you have the best feeling about of the group after the interviews.

    If you are selling because of things such as a divorce or job transfer keep that to yourselves during the interview and if possible, all the way through the whole process. David Chamberlain, an agent/poster on Trulia once stated that you should never at any point in the interview divulge the price you were thinking of.

    Alan May, a well respected Realtor, posted these great interview questions below on a thread related to interviewing agents. They should be of some help as well. As a supplemental question to Alan's question about photos, I would ask if the agent uses a professional photographer.  The attention to detail with the photos you saw on the agent’s listings might also be indicative of the overall quality of the agent’s work. Since the first impression many buyers will have of the house is from photos, you simply can’t choose an agent that allows bad photos to be a representation of  his or her listings, whether done by a professional or not. 

    • How many homes, of my type, have you sold? (recently, 6 mos, 1 year, 5 years)
    • What is your list / sale ratio?
    • What is your average "days on market"
    • What is your marketing plan for my home? (get it in writing)
      does it include internet (where?), do you offer multiple photos, virtual tours, color brochures.
    • Do you do open houses (why / why not / how often?)
    • What is your price recommendation (why / how did you arrive at that / do you have  comps to back that up?... do you have a "quick sale" price, and a normal sale price")
    • What is your plan if I'm not under contract in 30 days / 60 days / 90 days ...etc....
    • Why should I hire you? What do you bring to the table that's different than the myriad of other  agents out there who want my listing.
    • Will you offer a reduced commission (why / why not?)
    • Are you a full-time agent?
    • Do you practice dual-agency? (why / why not?)
    • What do you think of Agent A and Agent B (the two other agents you're interviewing)
    • Are you planning any upcoming vacations or are you going to be unavailable, and who is your back-up when you're gone?
    • What weekly communication can I expect from you?
      
    and lastly

    • Is there anything I haven't asked you, that you think I should have?

    A number of the initial questions that Alan suggested could possibly be verified by the agent's MLS printout that you asked the agent to bring.

    A couple of other questions that I feel worthy of the list would be: 

    • Who takes a buyer’s call when you are unavailable, or with clients?
    • Are you strictly full service, or do you also provide your services on an ala carte basis?


    A great post from a Trulia Voices Member named Alan in New Jersey brought this question to mind:

    Will buyers have to sign in to view my property on your site?

    The preferred answer is a “no.”

    After deciding on an agent, do not sign the listing agreement until the agent has went over everything in it with you. Don't settle for the quick one two, sign here thing that some like to do. Particularly look out for junk fees that the brokers like to slip in calling them a "transaction" or "administration," fee. Simply say no, and cross through it. If the agent wants your listing bad enough he/she will agree to the change. If the agent doesn't agree, he/she really doesn't want your listing that bad, and you probably wouldn't want that agent anyway. 

     I would find out when my MLS listing was to appear. Then soon as it came up, check everything on it. Make sure the photos are satisfactory, the description and directions are well written, and accurate. The first time mine went up there were so many errors, I couldn't count them all. The directions would have had a potential buyer in a cornfield.

     If there is even a remote chance of you eventually going FSBO, try to make sure that in the listing agreement that the agent protection period is short as possible. Try for 30 days, and that a protected list of buyers is given to you within a 3 business day period after the expiration of the listing. This should be written in the agreement.

    In the vast majority of cases the commission is split evenly between the listing and buy side. There are a few listing agents that will favor their side on the split. Look for that language in the agreement, and make sure the buy side is receiving at least the same commission as the listing side.

    The following is an exact quote from an agent on Zillow:

    "Only list for 90 days, longer listings make for lazy agents." 

    I've recently read that in some cases agents are adding in an automatic renewal clause, or addendum for the seller to sign. I'm sure these are very isolated situations, but at any rate watch out for it, and my advice to this type of agreement is to just say no.

    Finally, remember commissions are negotiable, and when you are given the old line, "You get what you pay for," ask "And just what exactly is your split with your broker? 

    http://www.zillow.com/advice-thread/You-get-what-you-pay-for/349102/

    Furthermore, with the buyer's market that we're currently in sellers concessions such as closing costs, home warranties and the like have become the norm. You might want to negotiate for the commission to be paid on the net of the sale, rather than the usual total purchase price. Just a thought, and it doesn't hurt to ask. 

    I wish to thank the following contributors to this blog, and no everyone I'm not looking for a finders fee if someone would use the links below to obtain their services. I believe that is illegal since I'm not a licensed professional, however I could be wrong on that. Nevertheless, they both probably know me well enough, just by postings, to know that I would be offended with so much as a McDonald's gift certificate. A Lamborghini would be nice though. :)

    Alan May
    Evanston, Skokie, Wilmette, IL
    http://www.coldwellbankeronline.com/Associate/AgentProfile.aspx?AgentID=2113&FirstName=Alan&IsFromAgentSrch=True&LastName=May&PageNum=1&RegionID=0&SortColumn=LastName&StateID=19

    David Chamberlain
    St. Petersburg, FL
  • Attention Nearsighted Realtors :

    Posted Under: Home Selling  |  November 15, 2008 6:21 AM  |  5,983 views  |  13 comments
    An agent recently made an observation in the way of a snide remark concerning a suggestion I have in my blog "Thinking About Selling as a FSBO." She took issue with my suggestion of obtaining free information from Realtors by getting CMAs to get an idea on a price to list their home. She stated in her post that she refuses to leave pricing information behind unless they sign a listing agreement. Below is just the way the suggestion reads and has read since the inception of my blog.

    "Initially interview 3 or 4 Realtors and get CMA's to at least get an idea on price, and for future reference on an agent in case you do bail out."

    Now lets go to the statistics that are thrown around on this site practically on a daily basis. Those being  that 80% of FSBOs end up signing with an agent. Of the remaining 20%, 5% sell to a family member, or someone they know. The 5% that sell to a family member or someone they know will probably avoid a Realtor anyway, leaving a minor 15% haircut to your chances of being called for your services in comparison to someone not considering doing a FSBO.
     
    Of those FSBO sellers that succeed that need to buy a new home and use a Realtor, wouldn't you think the FSBO would call one that was previously interviewed, or one that may have been involved with the sale of their house as a buyer agent? Of the ones interviewed, what do you think the chances are of the uncooperative Realtor being called? 

    It's said that the 80/20 rule applies in RE sales. That 20% of the Realtors account for 80% of the sales. Below is a copied and pasted post that an agent made on Zillow. I have a feeling this agent is in that 20%, or soon will be, at least in his market. He was giving advice to John and Lisa, who were about to do a FSBO.

    "John and Lisa Good Luck to You! Get a CMA done on your home before deciding anything. I don't consider anything I do a waste of time. You may need a Realtor for your next purchase and/or refer other friends and family to your helping parties. A good Realtor is one who will sacrifice today for business in the future."
     
    Enough said.
  • OK. Now which site is the better? Trulia or Zillow?

    Posted Under: Using Trulia  |  August 27, 2008 11:42 AM  |  6,503 views  |  59 comments

    As a newbie to Trulia, I felt I was in no real position to judge. It would have been unfair as I was not used to the format. I had become very used to the format used by Zillow. A knock that I did find against Trulia immediately was the blatant solicitation of clients that permeates throughout the site.  The other thing was that there seems to be a lot more personality on Zillow.  While I realize this is a professional based site, jeez it seems like it is full of a bunch of stuff-shirts. However, I did find immediately that the quality of questions and answers, in my opinion, were much better on Trulia.That is, if you took out all the solicitation. I also thought that there was no comparison in site functionality and features. It seemed as though Trulia was still in the dark ages, even though with it you had the ability to target individual cities for Q&A. I think with the recent upgrade this site is getting closer to Zillow's functionality or even surpassing it. What do you think?

    The above was posted prior to the last format change by Zillow. I think Zillow's new format is still a work in progress with many bugs to be worked out. I definitely find Trulia much easier to use at this time, but I'm confident Zillow will get it together. Their 5 minute edit feature is great. Now it seems though that Zillow has lost much of its personality and poster feedback for some reason since the format change. Oddly enough, contrary to what I posted in the first paragraph, I now think Trulia has more personality, but that wouldn't take much given Zillow these days. In all fairness to Zillow though, a poster asked a question on Trulia and did not receive one reply( http://www.trulia.com/voices/Home_Selling/Can_a_Landlord_sell_a_home_via_short_sale_to_his_t-102566 ), while on Zillow the poster received numerous (http://www.zillow.com/advice-thread/Can-a-landlord-short-sell-a-rental-property-to-the-tenant/215094/ ). The question was asked on Trulia Tues. March 23/09. It is now Sat. March 28th/09. Soon as I post this there will be a number of Zillow answers paraphrased on this site. I notice this site is great for answers being repeated and paraphrased. A big plus for Trulia is that it has a blogging section of its own. I think Zillow relys on feeds. The blogging section on Trulia is also very liberal in what content is allowed. FSBOs are allowed to place ads, and the agents can spam away. Fun for everyone. :)

    There is an update to this question that was posted originally in August of 2008. Drew Meyers is leaving Zillow> http://www.drewmeyersinsights.com/2010/01/26/its-time-for-the-next-chapter/
    Somehow, it seems to me at least, Zillow won't be the same. I definitely mean it won't be the same in a bad way. Drew was like the glue that held everything together. One has to wonder about the timing of his departure, and Zillow's decision to start charging for manually entered listings. It just seems oddly coincidental to me.

    Advantage Trulia.

    I think I answered my own question, but am I correct?

  • Thinking About Selling as a FSBO?

    Posted Under: Home Selling  |  August 24, 2008 10:05 PM  |  25,872 views  |  68 comments


    Disclaimer: There are numerous links to vendors and suppliers of various services contained in the following blog. As I haven't personally had any experience with them, do not consider them as recommendations from me. They are there for informational purposes, and possible options. Please, before using any of the individuals or businesses, research them thoroughly.

    I (dumb me) absolutely do not receive any financial remuneration for the mentions in the blog, and chances are many of those mentioned aren't even aware of it.

    Do not read any further than this paragraph. The original blog contains seriously outdated info. Please click here for an updated version.

    _______________________________________________________________________________

    Now, here goes:

    First, are you really a good FSBO candidate? You should ask yourself a few questions, such as below, before really considering it.

    1. Ladies, will you have someone available, sometimes at a drop of a hat, to help with your security when showing the house?

    2. Gentlemen, how comfortable and secure do you feel about allowing strangers into your home for showings?

    3. Do you have, and will you devote the necessary time for the marketing and showings?

    4. Will you be available for showings at the convenience of the buyer instead of only at your convenience?

    5. Are you a control freak? Someone who also is always trying to re-invent the wheel. Someone who likes to tell other people how to do their job better. Yes, those things describe me. However, that makes you good FSBO material because most Realtors probably would rather not have you for a client anyway. Mine got rid of me after three months. However, I had the last laugh as I sold to an unrepresented buyer for almost 20k more than where he was trying to lead me.

    If you felt you answered those questions honestly and with a yes, you should probably read on, because there are more things to consider, and some tips as well.

    I came across these two threads that are attached to the links below on Zillow that had some good security information on it for FSBOs. I thought I should include them here. Read the post on the second one by renfan1.

    http://www.zillow.com/advice-thread/FSBO-Security-Tips/243066/

    http://www.zillow.com/advice-thread/How-can-I-sell-my-home-without-a-real-estate-agent-company-What-is-the-process-guidelines/305451/

    I sincerely believe selling as a FSBO is probably, in the vast majority of cases, going to take longer than being represented by a top notch agent. If you are in a declining market, the longer you are on the market the more your home's value drops. You have to weigh one thing against the other in deciding to do a FSBO.

    Lets get one thing out of the way first. You can read in their entirety the studies attached to the links below if you like, but their findings basically state that Realtors do not net the seller more. 

    http://faculty.wcas.northwestern.edu/~ane686/research/fsbo.pdf

    http://www-siepr.stanford.edu/papers/pdf/06-41.pdf

    You might want to note that the Northwestern study was done in the Madison, Wisconsin market which, if not the strongest, is one of the strongest FSBO markets in the country.

    If you do decide to do a FSBO, you must be a patient person and one who can stay committed. Pricing is the very, very tricky part. If you say to yourself, "Well since I am not paying a listing commission, I can sell it for x dollars cheaper." That's fine if you can stay committed as a FSBO. However if you don't, and later decide to go with a Realtor, it would be very hard to then raise the price to accommodate the commission.

    Initially interview 3 or 4 agents and get CMAs to at least get an idea on price, and for future reference on an agent in case you do bail out. Hopefully you will end up with at least three CMAs. Of those, there could be one you really like. That's probably the one you shouldn't use. Actually if you get four, I would throw out both the high and the low. I would then average the remaining two and start there. 

    It has been brought to my attention that some agents choose not to leave comp info behind after the interview. My suggestion is to take your own notes on them from their information during the interview. If any object, show them the door. Hopefully, you will meet some good professionals that will leave the info behind for you to study along with their marketing plan.Those are the type you would want to represent you if you decide on representation later. During this interview try to find out the agents' views on an acceptable commission to be offered to buyer agents in your area.  Also, a good question to ask  is if they will do a flat-fee MLS listing for you, and ask if they have an ala carte price list available for various itemized services.After all is said and done you decide on using an agent, you might want to read this blog> 

     http://www.trulia.com/blog/rockinblu/2008/12/i_ve_got_my_fingers_cros 

    As a FSBO, once you do decide on an initial price, you must keep abreast of the changes in your market. In a down market you have to stay ahead of it to sell. You shouldn't be behind it chasing it down. While, the recent sales info on Trulia and Zillow are not going to be as complete or up to date as the local MLS, it still may be of some help in monitoring the recent solds. Below are two links. The first is to Trulia. Simply change the city to the correct one, and the second link is to Zillow with instructions on finding recent solds on Zillow.

    http://www.trulia.com/sold/Leesburg,FL/

    http://www.zillow.com/advice-thread/how-can-i-find-real-estate-transactions-in-the-past-3-months-for-milford-CT/314956/
     
    Don't get too cutesy with your listing price. For example, do not list at 299,900. At 300,000 you meet the search criteria in two directions, with 300,000 being the top in one, and the bottom in another.

    When selling a house, remember that you are in competition with other sellers. I think we all realize that could not be any truer than now. Your house is in a beauty contest, and is up against many agent prepared houses. In almost every case agents are more knowledgeable than you in preparing a home for sale. YOU CAN'T under estimate the value of decluttering and staging. THEY DON"T. The link below is to a regular poster on Zillow that may be able to help with this important issue.

    http://www.zillow.com/profile/An-OrderLee-Home/

    The other obvious issue is price.The main thing is to be real on price with very little wiggle room. You can always say no to a bad offer. The trick is to get an offer. There is something known as a 3/2/1 buydown that as a seller you could offer to stand apart from the crowd. I am not necessarily recommending it, but knowing about it can't hurt, and it is an option. The first link is to an explanation of it. The second link is to a discussion on it. The third link is to a company that specializes in handling them. I do not know anything about the company. If you decide this is something you would like to offer, do your research.

    http://www.bankrate.com/finance/real-estate/buy-down-points-to-get-the-deal-done.aspx

    http://www.zillow.com/advice-thread/3-2-1-buydowns-vs-price-reduction-a-great-way-to-sell-your-home/46967/

    http://www.321advantage.com/

    The general perception agents have of FSBOs is that the homes are overpriced, and the owners they have to deal with are too emotionally attached and non-professional. In short, they are a pain in the posterior. In dealing with the agents you must try to overcome being viewed as stereotypical. Offer a co-op that is consistent with the average rate for your area. An agent posted the following advice that should be taken to heart "be clear and up front to agents bringing the buyer- one aspect of FSBO that breeds caution from buyers agents is a lack of clarity on the fee."  In your ads you can add the abbreviation "CSB" with the percentage offered; e.g. 3% CSB. That's agent lingo for 3% commission to the selling broker. Yes, the selling broker. That's their term for buyer agent. 

    While you should definitely concentrate on agent showings, you still have to put a lot of focus on the unrepresented buyer. Do craigslist, and every free site you can find. When using craigslist it is absolutely essential to delete and re-post every week without fail. I actually did mine every four days. I think you can actually do every it every 48hrs.  However, be very wary of those who respond to your craigslist ad, while it's a great site to advertise, it's incredible the amount of scammers that permeate the site.  

    http://www.hoax-slayer.com/craigslist-account-phishing-scam.shtml

    http://www.craigslist.org/about/scams

    If you're considering posting your house on Zillow, you might very well want to read this blog for some tips on doing so.

    The thread on Zillow attached to the following link lists numerous free online listing sites http://www.zillow.com/advice-thread/Discussions/Preparing/US/4580_tid,1,2,0/FREE-Online-Listing-Websites-for-Agents-and-Owners/ and I just recently came across this one> http://www.yigdigs.com/

     Whatever sites you end up using, upload as many photos as possible. Some people are overly concerned about their zestimate on Zillow, but if you're not and you opted for a $39.95 "Featured Listing", or a "Make Me Move" posting, you should post a link from your craigslist ad to your Zillow ad, as Zillow allows more photos.

    Postlets ( http://www.postlets.com/home.php ) is another good site. Their "Pro" option for $10 is very nice.Using the postlets html code makes posting to craigslist quite easy. See answer #12 from the link below.

    http://www.postlets.com/info/help.php#3

    If you would like to have a virtual tour for your listing, you might want to check this company out>  http://www.buildatour.com/ 

    Now if you're really computer savvy, and good with a camera, you can blow some people's minds by making a photosynth tour>>>  http://photosynth.net/

    If you would like to build your own website, you might want to try>>>
    http://www.wix.com/

     Being on the MLS is absolutely essential for getting the most exposure. I don't know anything personally about using the sites attached to the links below to get on the MLS, however, I have read a very positive post by someone who used the first one. I also saw an agent give her recommendation on the site attached to the second link, and other sellers on the remaining two.

    http://www.owners.com/Tools/SellerHandbook/DecideToSell.aspx

    http://www.forsalebyowner.com/listing/new

    http://homeworksre.com/

    http://www.housepad.com/

    As for as I am personally concerned, I probably would only consider an out of town source for getting on the MLS if  it was free. Another reason would be if I couldn't find an agent locally that was willing to do the MLS listing for a flat rate that I felt comfortable with. There is something to be said about staying local. If you do decide on an out of town service, ask the company what MLS feeds are included, each MLS is different. You certainly want one in your area, not one in Timbuktu. No matter how you get on the MLS, test it after you are on. Have a friend posing as a buyer call and email to see how it is handled. There have been reported instances of those calls being handed off to agents who just use them as leads to sell other listings. Below is some info that was supplied to me regarding flat fee services:

    "Sellers need to be careful when choosing a flat fee listing service to get on the MLS. They make you put the agent's number on the yard sign and in the MLS listing. If the contract you sign says that the flat fee listing service gets the buyer's commission if THEY find the buyer, that should be a BIG red flag. When an unrepresented potential buyer calls the agent, the agent can refuse to give the buyer your contact information. Instead, the agent "finds" this buyer for you, and you wind up paying the buyer's agent commission to your flat fee broker when there was no buyer's agent. As a potential buyer, this happened to me. I called the seller directly when the flat fee broker refused to give me the seller's contact info, but many buyers would not pick up on what the flat fee broker was trying to do. I should add that I've dealt with other flat fee brokers who gladly passed me along to the seller. Not all flat fee services are the same. Be careful and READ THE CONTRACT!!!!"  

    When you find a buyer, and if you really become apprehensive about the paperwork, the same agent that did your MLS listing will probably do the paperwork for you for a reasonable fee if you are intimidated by attorneys. My buyer was unrepresented. I had all the necessary forms that I had gotten from a title and escrow company. We went over the necessary disclosures and hashed out a deal. I took the info to a RE attorney to draw up a contract, and contacted the title and escrow company. The buyer ordered the inspection and took the contract to his bank. The bank ordered an appraisal. We closed. Sounds simple, and it was, but obviously this is not always the case. My buyer had a letter of financing approval which is very important. If an offer comes in without one, it is essential to retain the right to keep showing the house.

    There are advocates of having the house professionally inspected before putting it on the market. I was advised by an agent not to do it. Deborah Madey on this thread> http://www.trulia.com/voices/Home_Selling/Does_the_seller_have_to_submit_a_copy_of_her_inspe-96780  states the same thing. BTW, if you are in TX, be sure to read the post by Dennis Anderson. 

    House accessibility is another issue for FSBO's. Get an electronic lockbox. These are the safest, and the most widely used one is called the Supra ibox. Check to see if one is available for rent through whatever agent or company you use to get on the MLS. You might even check with the local MLS on renting one.You can also generally buy one used on ebay. However, it will have to be re-programmed for your area. GE will do that for $25 if you send a letter (must be on business letterhead) from both the old MLS and the new one giving permission for the re-programming. You may call 1-800-545-9601 for more info. If all this seems too complicated just opt for the Supra C-3 push button (see first link), or the Ryobi model available online from Home Depot (second link),and change the combination regularly. It obviously goes without saying to do everything possible to protect easily removed valuables when allowing strangers into your home, particularly when those strangers are not being monitored by you. 

    http://www.sanzospecialties.com/index.cfm?action=cat.prodInfo&productID=33&categoryID=59

    http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeId=10051&productId=100671272&langId=-1&catalogId=10053&ci_src=14110944&ci_sku=100671272&cm_mmc=shopping-_-googlebase-_-D25X-_-100

     Make sure you get a quality professional looking sign with your phone number, mls number, and stating that you are offering a broker co-op. Keep in mind that most, if not all, MLS systems have rules against "by owner" signs. Using one could cause your listing to be removed. It's definitely a good idea to use one provided by the listing service as long as it has all the info mentioned earlier. If it doesn't, make sure that you have an additional one made stating "broker co-op," or use the "CSB" abbreviation with possibly even the percentage stated, as well as anything else that would be missing. You should  have a flyer box with nice, fully informative flyers. Never leave your home without rolling the home phone over to your cell phone. Have a good RE attorney ready, and a title and escrow company picked out.

    If you have a showing by an agent and you're home, if you can't leave stay out of the way, but available for questions. The agent doesn't need, or want your help with the client. Remember if you have an electronic lockbox, or even a pushbutton, there may be showings when you are not at home. These showings obviously should only be done by verified agents using their  key card for lockbox access. However, if you are using a pushbutton you must be doubly sure who you give the combination out to, and change it afterwards. A good way to verify that it's an agent that's calling is to request that a confirmation is done from the office using the agency's phone with the published number. After receiving that call, use the caller ID listed number, and check the number against the one on their site or in the phone book. .

    You should have information lists available that are suitable for handout with all the pertinent info such as the age of the roof, as well as the furnace and air conditioning system, along with recent upgrades, and replacements. Also, It might be a good idea to have copies of fully filled out disclosure forms available as well. While on the subject of disclosure, hopefully this doesn't apply to you> http://www.zillow.com/advice-thread/Short-Sale-and-or-Foreclosure-is-a-Material-Fact-and-Must-be-Disclosed/206315/ If it does, check out your state law concerning it. 

    There can always be a chance for no-shows on showing appointments. Read Don Tepper's advice to help minimize this problem on this thread > http://www.trulia.com/voices/Home_Selling/Is_there_anything_I_can_do_to_prevent_no_shows_-140822

    Keep a list of all the names and addresses of people who view your home. If you eventually end up going with a Realtor, you may want to exclude them from the listing agreement. However, remember that an agent may be reluctant to spend a lot of marketing dollars on a listing where the rug could be pulled out from under them at any time. A listing on the MLS with exclusions is often avoided by agents as well.

    I came up with an idea for a supplemental sign to be used with your regular FSBO sign. It is to be used on days when the house is show worthy and can be done on any day of the week. You never know when an agent might be driving one of his/her clients around in your neighborhood and has a few spare minutes. It has had mixed reviews from agents, and it should go without saying that if you use it, ID, ID, and ID.
       

    This is worthy of mentioning again. If you do go FSBO, the sign is very important. Do not look like so many FSBOs that use a $10 Home Depot sign. For about $20 more you could probably get one done professionally. 

    Probably the best addition to the "For Sale" sign is actually you. Whenever possible, spend time working out front. I had two impromptu showings while raking leaves. You would think weekend afternoons would be the best times for this to occur, but both times it was during the week. Once an agent with a client pulled up and asked, which was a very good showing, and the other was a couple on their own. The spiral staircase scared them both off though.

    Another contributor to this blog brought this up:

    "In addition to a professional-looking sign, professional-looking listings/ads are a MUST. This means error-free spelling, grammar and punctuation in the listing copy, as well as plenty of clear, well-lit photos.  With digital cameras being so inexpensive, there is no excuse not to have photos...nice photos. I took five or six shots of each room, brought them up on the computer, and chose the very best ones."

    Also, my favorite Realtor on this site did a post some time ago about the importance of getting on the broker tour in the neighborhood. This does come from a post he did on another site, and I hope he doesn't mind me re-posting it here.

    "Getting on the broker's tour is critical. Much of the trouble that FSBOs have when trying to sell, is exposure. Agents can't show your property if they don't know about the listing, and don't have any information about it. Each agent may represent 2-3 clients who might be interested in a property like yours... so if you can expose it to a dozen agents, you've consequently exposed the house to a potential 36 viewers, who many come back. In order to be on the tour, you MUST be on the MLS, and you list the scheduled tour through it... hours must be followed exactly... each market sets their own. Call the local MLS board (or any local realtor) to find out what the times and day are in your area... and have a couple of broker's tours the first month.

    If you really want to attract Realtors... (and you do!) serve some food... we're unbelievable food-whores.... it should be finger-food.. something that can easily be carried and won't mess up your house. Doughnuts, Granola Bars, Nice Cold Mini-water bottles in hot weather, cookies, finger sandwiches... individually wrapped candy... hot Starbucks coffee on a cold day... and make sure you ADVERTISE the food in the MLS.. .there's a check off box for refreshments... and a small area to describe the property... and tell them you're serving a snack!!

    Good luck."

    A Realtor on another site that is also one of my favorites posted this:

    "The important thing to consider is the overwhelming number of buyers are using Realtors and in order to capture them you should try to be as realtor friendly as possible.
    I don't have the time to scour all the FSBO sites that are out there and seemingly newly arriving everyday. Get on the MLS. I suggest you create a very nice flyer, drop by the local offices, shake a few hands and generate the competition to sell it. Yes you will hear some of the NAR crappola, but only the bad ones will dismiss a paycheck because you are FSBO. Make me want to sell it before somebody else, including you."

    Below is a lnk to some flyer templates.

    http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/templates/TC010014361033.aspx?CategoryID=CT101466191033

    Along with the flyer, it might be an idea to have some agent protection forms attached.
    See the link below for an idea of one that was supplied by Yvette. The one she illustrated as a sample appears to be one an agent would create, however a seller could easily use most of the language and create one for the agent.

    http://www.trulia.com/voices/Home_Selling/Would_this_Agreement_to_bring_Buyer_to_Non_Listed_-83119

     A veteran FSBO seller contributed the following :

    "We have been successful in selling our homes FSBO the last two times. I think much of the advice here is probably pretty good - selling FSBO is not easy and definitely requires a lot of homework, but I would still do it that way because I see no reason to pay a listing agent to do something that I can do myself.

    I will say that both times we did pay a flat fee service to list our home on MLS, and we clearly offered a buyer's agent commission. I hate that I have to pay a buyers agent, but I just don't think there is anything out there that rivals the MLS for exposure - sad, but true. And the first place a buyers agent will look when deciding whether or not to show my house is under the heading of 'Commission'. If I clearly state I am willing to coop, that takes a big hurdle off the table for the agent.

    We also do a lot of pre-sale marketing. Many photos and lots of house information passed around via email to pretty much anyone and everyone we know saying 'if you or anyone you know might be interested, please pass this attachment along, etc.' We got at least 6 showings of our current property that way - and often these are "good" buyers. "Good" in the sense that they probably already live in the area, know the area (you don't have to sell them on why your school district is better than the other one, etc), and know when they see a well priced property. In other words, they know the context of the area.

    And finally, it really is all about the price. We sold our current home FSBO in less than 2 days on the market. We really thought that we could probably sit around and wait on a good buyer and get $950K in a decent market. So, we can either sit here and argue that our house is worth that much, and wait a while, OR we can price it aggressively and actually SELL the house and get on with our lives. We obviously chose the later. Am I sitting here wishing I could have gotten more for the house ?- NO! I'm thrilled that I don't have to keep it spotlessly clean (with 3 kids and 4 pets underfoot), and that I can now move forward with making offers on whatever will be my next home with nothing holding me back. I know that there will be 'bumps in the road' on even the cleanest contract - home inspections, small repairs, etc., but we now have two parties very interested in making the deal go through, so those things can almost always be worked out. Good luck."

    Below is a link to some information of importance in dealing with buyers that I found on Zillow.

    http://www.zillow.com/wikipages/Negotiating-Goals-for-the-Seller/

    Below is a link that could help in preparing a counter offer.

    http://www.sell-my-house-fsbo.com/real-estate-counter-offer.html

    When we found our buyer, or better put, our buyer found us, I really didn't even have a clue what to do about earnest money. So you won't have the same issue, the link below should help.

    http://www.trulia.com/voices/Home_Selling/Where_Is_Earnest_Money_Held_-223463

    Here is some possible info that you may get on this site that I have read before to encourage FSBO's to use Realtors:

    "80% of For Sale By Owners end up listing with a professional;

    10% sell on their own
    10% decide not to sell.

    Rebuttal: There is no doubt that a greater percentage of represented homes come to a successful sale and close. However, keep in mind that the numbers given are most probably coming from a biased source, and secondly these studies are based for the most part on MLS listing information. I for one, never even had our house on the MLS while doing a FSBO and still sold. You can just about bet your bottom dollar those type of transactions are not considered very often in arriving at those percentages. Also, the math doesn't begin to add up. Even just going with the NAR's latest survey (The 2009 National Association of Realtors® Profile of Home Buyers and Sellers), their deinition of a FSBO (those that have not used a flat-fee service) accounted for 11% of the sales. For only 10% of the original number of FSBOs to account for 11% of the sales that would mean that better than 90% of all sellers started out as FSBOs- .10/.11.

    ~~~~~

    "A national survey of home sellers showed that homes listed by Realtors average selling for16% MORE than those sold without."

    Rebuttal: The NAR survey that is generally referred to does go on to point out that if you take out FSBO sales where there was a friend or acquaintance involved in the transaction and just look at transactions in the open market the percentage is tighter. You also notice that the words "selling for" are used. This does not address the agent's commission that is taken off the top of that number, nor does it address the fact that a vast majority of higher end houses are never listed as FSBO's, which obviously skews the numbers. This was also previously addressed in the study linked to earlier in the post.  Also, the September 08 issue of Consumer Reports magazine reported that FSBO sellers are more likely to get their asking price while agents deliver, on average, a sales price that is $5,000 less than the original asking price.

    ~~~~

    "Commissions are a deductible expense."

    Rebuttal: A commission might be if you are selling at a loss and want to add to it. A commission can be if you are selling something other than your primary residence. A commission can be if your net proceeds from the sale is over $250,000 if single, or over $500,000 if married and filing jointly. The link below explains it better. The simple truth is if you have any doubt, consult a tax professional.


    http://taxes.about.com/od/taxplanning/qt/home_sale_tax.htmhttp://www.trulia.com/voices/Home_Selling/Can_anyone_direct_me_to_the_new_legislation_regard-92312


    In relation to the info supplied on the above link, there have been some changes to the rules described on it, which are covered in the link below.
     
    http://www.trulia.com/voices/Home_Selling/Can_anyone_direct_me_to_the_new_legislation_regard-92312

    I did recently come across what I felt to be an informative Realtor blog. There are things listed in it, other than the Realtor slant, that as a FSBO you would be well advised to take note of. I would look it over thoroughly for tips that may apply to you. 

    http://www.whydidntmyhomesell.com/

    One Realtor did post this concern with FSBO's:

    "FSBO home owners tend to not have a grasp of the anti-discrimination laws and I've had more than one that have stated things that made me cringe in front of a prospective buyer."
     
    Given that, it might not hurt to really familiarize yourself with the info on the site connected to the link below.

    http://www.hud.gov/offices/fheo/FHLaws/index.cfm

    California residents in particular should probably look for Carol-lynne's post in the comments section for this blog. She brings up a very good point.

    There you have it. About 10 months of accumulation regarding doing a FSBO. Additions are certainly welcome. Open minded Realtors opinions are much valued, and buyers and sellers input as well. Please do not just reply to this to bash Realtors. This is not what it is intended for any more than Realtors getting on and trying to discourage FSBO's by taking the standard NAR line.

    Many thanks to those named below who have contributed to the information provided in this blog. Very little of it can be credited to me. Particularly, I wish to thank the agents who were so helpful and generous with their time.

    Agents:

    Alan May
    Evanston, Skokie, Wilmette, IL
    http://www.coldwellbankeronline.com/Associate/AgentProfile.aspx?AgentID=2113&FirstName=Alan&IsFromAgentSrch=True&LastName=May&PageNum=1&RegionID=0&SortColumn=LastName&StateID=19

    Anita Crum
    Newport News, VA
    http://www.anitacrum.com/

    Carol-lynne
    La Quinta, CA
    http://www.carol-lynnemittelbusher.com/

    Don Tepper
    Fairfax, VA
    http://www.solutions3dhome.com/

    Jeff Konstant

    Other posters:

    fourier2020
    geomath
    headinghome
    renfan1
    Spec_Tater
    Yvette

 
Copyright © 2014 Trulia, Inc. All rights reserved.   |  
Have a question? Visit our Help Center to find the answer