Home > Blogs > Paul A. Disegna's Blog
114,857 views

Paul A. Disegna's Blog

By Paul A. DiSegna | Real Estate Pro in Rhode Island
  • Keeping you updated on the market!

    Posted Under: Home Buying in Rhode Island, Home Selling in Rhode Island, Financing in Rhode Island  |  December 26, 2011 4:54 AM  |  2,650 views  |  No comments


    For the week of 

    December 26 , 2011


    MARKET RECAP

    Much has been written and said on the depressing influence of shadow inventory on the housing recovery. Most of us are familiar with the ubiquitous refrain: excessive shadow inventory impedes recovery because it lowers home prices, which, in turn, retards home sales and building activity while encouraging strategic defaults.

    Shadow inventory hasn't gotten much better in recent months, but it hasn't gotten worse either. CoreLogic reports 1.6 million housing units are slotted into the shadow-inventory category – a five-month supply at the current sales pace. These numbers have held steady since July, but it's worth noting that they are a significant improvement over the numbers posted this time last year.

    Positive news from homebuilders suggests that shadow inventory could become less of a depressing influence going forward. Homebuilder confidence is growing. The homebuilder sentiment index rose to 21 in December, posting its best reading in nearly 18 months.

    Homebuilders are reporting more interest from potential buyers, and more action from these buyers to boot. Housing starts surged 9.3 percent to an annualized rate of 685,000 units in November. The gain was led by a 25.3-percent jump in the multifamily component, though the much larger single-family component also improved, 2.3 percent, after a 3.6-percent rise in October.

    The fact is that confidence and activity don't increase if you are overly concerned about falling prices and rising inventory. Yes, shadow inventory remains a problem, but not an intractable one. Markets have been clearing and will continue to clear inventory until more normalized supply levels are reached.

    It's difficult to say when the clearing process will end. The NAR's sweeping revision to its data reporting clouds any estimates. Sales of existing homes posted at the annualized rate of 4.4-million units in November. Initial consensus estimates called for 5.1 million units, but this was before the NAR announced its revision. Based on the revised October sales, November sales actually posted a 4-percent month-over-month increase.

    Pricing and supply were the positive takeaways. The NAR's data also show that the median national home price increased 2.1 percent to $164,000, while supply dropped to seven months at the current sales pace compared to 7.6 months in October.

    The degree of NAR's revisions raised a few eyebrows, shaving sales, through 2007 to 2010, by a monthly average of 14 percent. But it's important to keep in mind that where we're going is always more important than where we've been.

    That's also an important point to keep in mind when vetting the mortgage market. We've been warning for the past year that borrowers have become too complacent with the idea that rates will remain permanently low. We think this is a dangerous assumption because inflation is a permanent fixture of our economy and money supply. Over time, investors need to be compensated for loss of purchasing power. Interest rates are a compensating variable.

    To be sure, mortgages rates remain low, but improvements have been slight over the past month. This tells us that rates really don't have much incentive to go lower. This isn't to say they can't go lower, but it's important to remember that a 4-percent 30-year fixed-rate loan is the anomaly not the norm.

    Economic 
    Indicator
    Release 
    Date and Time
    Consensus 
    Estimate
    Analysis

    S&P/Case-Shiller 
    Home Price Index
    (October)

    Tues., Dec. 27,
    9:00 am , et

    0.2% (Decrease)

    Moderately Important. More current data point to firming prices in many metropolitan markets.

    Consumer Confidence
    (December)

    Tues., Dec. 27,
    10:00 am , et

    60 Index

    Important. Improving job prospects are lifting confidence and home-buying prospects for 2012.

    Mortgage Applications

    Wed., Dec. 28,
    7:00 am , et

    None

    Important. Purchase activity has slowed in the past month, but remains positive.

    Pending Home Sales Index
    (November)

    Thurs., Dec. 29,
    10:00 am , et

    94 Index
    Important. Recent gains in contract signings point to a firm start to the new year.

    Bottom Up Over Top Down

    Housingwire.com recently ran a short but acknowledging article on smaller mortgage originators. Basically, the article explained the positive growth in this market segment.

    The article didn't surprise us, or reveal anything we didn't already know. Small business people tend to be more nimble in meeting consumer demands than their large counterparts. This isn't to say that large originators aren't populated with employees with a small-business mentality, but when you're in the trenches handling most aspects of the business, you tend to be a little more attuned to market reality.

    The point we want to highlight is that we are very important aggregators and disseminators of market information and knowledge. We know how to get things done, and markets will improve mostly due to our actions and less to directives from sources that are less connected.

    We say this because it's easy to forget how important our presence and insights are for getting things done and correcting market imbalances. We think this sentiment is worth keeping at the forefront of our thoughts as we head into the new year.

     


    If you wish to unsubscribe, click on the link below and send the email. If this message was forwarded to you, please reply to the sender. Click Here To Unsubscribe

    EQUAL HOUSING LENDER

    This Newsletter is for informational purposes only. The information contained herein may not be applicable to every situation or jurisdiction and we urge you to consult your professional advisor prior to acting on information contained herein. The content, accuracy and opinions expressed herein are not verified or endorsed by the sponsor hereof.
  • Keeping you updated on the market!

    Posted Under: Home Buying in Rhode Island, Home Selling in Rhode Island, Financing in Rhode Island  |  December 19, 2011 4:39 AM  |  3,083 views  |  No comments


    For the week of 

    December 19 , 2011


    MARKET RECAP

    Can we trust the data? Everyone is asking that question after the National Association of Realtors said it would revise its home sales data for the past four years. The revised data are scheduled for release this coming Wednesday with the NAR's monthly report on home sales for November.

    The NAR cited several reasons for revising sales. The most notable reason was that the NAR believed it was overcompensating for sales that did not occur on the regional and local real estate listing services from which the NAR extracted data.

    The bottom line is that sales and unsold inventory will be revised downward, but monthly percentage changes in sales volumes, months of outstanding inventory, and median home prices will remain unchanged.

    Some media outlets have attacked the NAR's revisions from an alarmist or snarky angle. Neither is deserved; the NAR is simply admitting that it needs to be more accurate. What the NAR revisions really highlight is the difficulty in producing national numbers that are meaningful to any local market. If you think about it, is a median national sales price of $167,000 meaningful to a tony suburban enclave in Alexandria , Virginia or to an overbuilt Las Vegas ? We would argue that it isn't.

    That said, we will still post and examine the national numbers, because they interest many market participants. The inputs can also be revealing. For example, Corelogic reported that total home prices were down 3.9 percent in October from a year ago, but prices were down by just 0.5 percent when distressed sales are excluded. This tells us that we have two distinct markets at work, which most of us knew anyway, but which much of the lay public doesn't know.

    The national numbers can also set the mood and expectations of any one buyer or borrower. It's in our best interest then, and it's also truthful, to highlight the positives in a market dominated by negativity. To that end, we'll mention that Swiss financial services firm Credit Suisse told its clients last week that “ U.S. homes now appear fairly valued compared to median family income.” Credit Suisse's analysis also shows that shadow inventory and mortgage defaults will improve noticeably in 2012.

    Mortgage rates, contrary to our expectations, will also continue to improve. Most financing options moved lower this past week, with the 30-year fixed-rate loan hitting a new low in many markets (though it's worth noting that a new low can be hit with only a couple basis-points move). Our outlook for an improving stock market, which would draw funds out of the bond market, is being negated by Europe's inability to deal with the near-bankruptcy of a few of its Mediterranean countries.

    While the sense of urgency to refinance or purchase has been reduced, we still think it's best to lock and take advantage of today's rates. The fact is that most borrowers are less frustrated being locked and wishing they were floating than the reverse.

    Economic 
    Indicator
    Release 
    Date and Time
    Consensus 
    Estimate
    Analysis

    Home Builder Index
    (December)

    Mon., Dec. 19,
    10:00 am, et

    21 Index

    Important. Sentiment is improving on rising buyer interest and falling distressed-property competition.

    Housing Starts
    (November)

    Tues., Dec. 20,
    8:30 am , et

    632,000 (Annualized) 

    Important. Increases in permits suggest building activity is gaining permanent traction.

    Mortgage Applications

    Wed., Dec. 21,
    7:00 am, et

    None

    Important. The lull in purchase applications points to moderating sales growth.

    Existing Home Sales
    (November)

    Wed., Dec. 21,
    10:00 am, et

    5.1 Million (Annualized)
    Very Important. The NAR's redacted data could raise financial-market volatility.

    Gross Domestic Product
    (3rd Quarter 2011)

    Thurs., Dec. 22,
    8:30 am , et

    2.1% (Annualized Increase)

    Important. Revised numbers show that economic growth slowed in the 3 rd quarter.

    New Home Sales
    (November)

    Fri., Dec. 23,
    10:00 am, et

    313,000 (Annualized)
    Important. Less pricing pressure and lower inventory levels point to a stronger market heading into 2012.

    A Prediction With No Guarantee

    Former Yankees catcher Yogi Berra is as well known for his malapropisms as for his catching ability. On the former, Berra once famously quipped, “It's tough to make predictions, especially about the future.” With that thought in mind, we'll take a shot at predicting the mortgage-rate market for early 2012.

    The reflexive response is to say that rates have to remain low. After all, the Federal Reserve has openly stated that it will continue to reinvest short-term securities into long-term securities. The Fed also said that it would keep reinvesting in mortgage-backed securities. Both activities will surely raise the pressure for mortgage rates to remain low.

    Now, couple the Fed's resolve to hold long-term rates low with Europe 's ongoing travails and our own sluggish economy and it would appear mortgage rates would have to remain near today's levels at least through the first quarter of 2012.

    With all that said, don't overlook or underestimate the “unseen” – the unexpected event that moves markets. Everything seen favors low rates, and few pundits are expecting higher rates. Because of that fact, we think the inevitable “unseen” favors a spike up in rates over a spike down.

     


    If you wish to unsubscribe, click on the link below and send the email. If this message was forwarded to you, please reply to the sender. Click Here To Unsubscribe

    EQUAL HOUSING LENDER

    This Newsletter is for informational purposes only. The information contained herein may not be applicable to every situation or jurisdiction and we urge you to consult your professional advisor prior to acting on information contained herein. The content, accuracy and opinions expressed herein are not verified or endorsed by the sponsor hereof.
     
  • Keeping you updated on the market!

    Posted Under: Home Buying in Rhode Island, Home Selling in Rhode Island, Financing in Rhode Island  |  December 12, 2011 6:03 AM  |  1,170 views  |  No comments


    For the week of 

    December 12 , 2011


    MARKET RECAP

    We tend to view most situations from an optimist's perspective, because optimists are more likely to see solutions that pessimists overlook; therefore, optimists tend to be better problem solvers.

    Optimism, we have found, is also usually rewarded. The housing recovery has taken longer than most of us would like, but the market is recovering, and the recovery will likely gain pace as we progress through 2012.

    Mortgage delinquencies are one area of continued progress. TransUnion forecasts delinquencies of 60 days or more will peak at 6 percent of all mortgages during the first quarter of 2012, and then fall to 5 percent by year's end. This is actually a continuation of a longer-term trend that has been overlooked: delinquencies this year are expected to fall 7 percent, which follows a 7 percent decline in 2010.

    The trend in the National Association of Home Builders/First American Improving Markets Index is also cause for optimism. According to the index, the number of improving housing markets expanded for a fourth-consecutive month, rising 37 percent to 41 in December from 30 in November. The index states that the expansion in both number and geographic diversity of markets is proof that markets continue to grow more heterogeneous; that is, more dependent on local factors than national ones. This is a point we've been making for the past six months.

    The news on pricing was less upbeat. CoreLogic reports that house prices dipped nationally month-over-month in October. Year-over-year, prices have declined 3.9 percent, but only 0.5 percent when distressed properties are removed from the equation.

    A recent report by Barclays Capital should help ease pricing concerns. According to Barclays, the housing market will be buoyed by improving job growth and by the fact that prices for non-distressed properties are stabilizing without government support. On price stabilization, Barclays housing analyst Stephen Kim writes, “[W]e are amazed at how little attention it [the recovery in non-distressed homes] has been getting from the media and the street.”

    We, on the other hand, are less amazed. We've been hammering the point on stabilizing prices for months, but we also know that bad news always sells better than good news.

    Speaking of good news, mortgage rates continue to hold steady and near multi-decade lows. We've noticed that the yield on 10-year U.S. Treasury notes has trended lower most of this past week, which has been something of a surprise, given that the economic news, for the most part, has been positive.

    Mortgage rates have been holding steady for the past month or so, but we think upward pressure is steadily building – mostly due to an improving economy and job growth (and for a reason we'll explicate below).

    Economic 
    Indicator
    Release 
    Date and Time
    Consensus 
    Estimate
    Analysis

    Retail Sales
    (November)

    Tues., Dec.13,
    8:30 am , et

    0.3% (Increase)

    Important. Consumers continue to spend more than sentiment measures suggest, thus portending higher economic growth.

    Business Inventories
    (November)

    Tues., Dec.13,
    10:00 am, et

    0.5% (Increase)

    Important. Careful inventory management coupled with incremental sales growth should lead to improved job growth.

    Mortgage Applications

    Wed., Dec. 14,
    7:00 am, et

    None

    Important. Refinance and purchase activity point to rising lending demand.

    Import Prices
    (November)

    Wed., Dec. 14,
    8:30 am , et

    1.5% (Increase)
    Important. Rising import-price inflation could pressure interest rates.

    Producer Price Index
    (November)

    Thurs., Dec. 15,
    8:30 am , et

    All Goods: 0.1% (Increase)
    Core: 0.2% (Increase)

    Important. Rising core prices (less food and energy) point to rising producer-price inflation.

    Industrial Production
    (November)

    Thurs., Dec.15,
    9:15 am , et

    0.2% (Increase)
    Important. Continued production growth will eventually stimulate lagging consumer sectors.

    Consumer Price Index
    (November)

    Fri., Dec. 16,
    8:30 am , et

    All Goods: No Change
    Core: 0.2% (Increase)

    Important. Lower gasoline prices have slowed consumer-price inflation.

    HARP 2.0 and Supply and Demand

    A few weeks ago, we wrote about changes in the Home Affordable Refinance Program, dubbed HARP 2.0. This latest incarnation of HARP will impact the supply-and-demand dynamics in the mortgage market, namely due to the removal of the 125-percent loan-to-value cap.

    More borrowers will qualify for mortgage loans; that obviously means there will be more demand for mortgage loans. What's more, demand could increase sooner rather than later, particularly if borrowers who don't need HARP, but want to exploit today's low rates to avoid the possibility of a delay, ratchet up demand.

    To be sure, HARP 2.0 will be a good deal for many mortgagors who have been unable to refinance because of diminished home equity. Many of these mortgagors will benefit, even if mortgages rates were to rise a full-percentage point or more.

    Now, we're not forecasting a percentage point rise in rates when HARP 2.0 kicks into gear, but more demand does tend to raise costs, including the cost of mortgage financing. This is something borrowers who don't need HARP but who could take advantage of today's rates should think about, because many of them won't benefit if mortgage rates move significantly higher.

     

     


    If you wish to unsubscribe, click on the link below and send the email. If this message was forwarded to you, please reply to the sender. Click Here To Unsubscribe

    EQUAL HOUSING LENDER

    This Newsletter is for informational purposes only. The information contained herein may not be applicable to every situation or jurisdiction and we urge you to consult your professional advisor prior to acting on information contained herein. The content, accuracy and opinions expressed herein are not verified or endorsed by the sponsor hereof.
     
  • Where Abundance Abounds

    Posted Under: Home Buying in Rhode Island, Home Selling in Rhode Island  |  December 10, 2011 10:48 AM  |  988 views  |  No comments

    RISMEDIA, Saturday, December 10, 2011—

    Although we’ve been hearing over and over that distressed property sales are a huge part of today’s real estate market, pursuing short sales as a viable business option has been avoided by over 90% of real estate agents. Less than 2% of those who venture into the short sale arena are successful. Yet, over the next five years, it is predicted that 40-60% of all sales will be distressed, i.e., REO/short sales.

    Short sales are too big a piece of the market to simply ignore. Getting involved in short sales can grow your business and give you a referral stream for life. So what’s causing the disconnect? Bad press.

    Most negative information/misconceptions about short sales come from a lack of experience or knowledge. With proper education and training, however, you can successfully close short sales. It takes patience, organization and a serious amount of persistence. It also requires a dedication to the learning process and a constant honing of your skills. Trust me, I know this firsthand. I am a member of a team that has conducted over 300 successful short sale transactions.

    I won’t try and tell you that short sales are easy, but I can vouch for the fact that they can be a very big part of your business now and for years to come. The catch? You must be willing to invest the time it takes to become proficient in this important real estate niche.

    Here are a couple of things to think about:

    • Sellers who are in a distressed situation are usually emotionally and economically distraught. By stepping in to help them, you are relieving a huge amount of pressure and giving them a solution for the issue they’ve been struggling with.
    • By stopping someone’s home from going to foreclosure, you create a “raving fan” who will tell all his/her friends and family members what a great job you did. This will create an ongoing referral system for you.
    • Word-of-mouth is the very best form of marketing. Successfully stopping someone’s house from going to foreclosure will create a very loyal and satisfied customer who will be happy to tell everyone in the community about your skills.
    • Completion of just a couple short sales will create “buzz” about your skill, which, in turn, will create presence in the real estate community and the consumer community as well.
    • By preventing homes from going to foreclosure, you will be performing a community service in your area. You will be actively stopping the foreclosure plague in your community. This may attract media attention and lead to public speaking events, etc.
    • By participating in short sales, you will create a niche for yourself in the community, which will separate you from the competition.
    • Short sales create banking connections that may allow you to get into the REO banking business as well.


    Understand this: Most of the negativity you hear in reference to short sales, such as, “they take too long,” “the bank is not willing to accept the value,” or “the bank denies sellers into the program,” comes from uneducated and/or inexperienced parties handling these types of transactions.

    Next month, we’ll talk about how to avoid some of these issues and we’ll provide you with a roadmap that will allow you to successfully navigate through the short sale process.

    George “Gee” Dunsten, president of Gee Dunsten Seminars, Inc., has been a real estate agent and broker/owner for almost 40 years. Dunsten has been a senior instructor with the Council of Residential Specialists for more than 20 years.

    RISMedia welcomes your questions and comments. Send your e-mail to: realestatemagazinefeedback@rismedia.com.

  • Expert Advice: Selling your Home over the Holidays

    Posted Under: Market Conditions in Rhode Island, Home Selling in Rhode Island, How To... in Rhode Island  |  December 8, 2011 4:31 AM  |  919 views  |  No comments

    RISMEDIA, Thursday, December 08, 2011—

    The holidays are fast approaching. Regardless of what denomination you are- the next couple of months are probably going to be more hectic than most as you prepare to conclude 2011 with friends and family. If your home is on the market, this time of year is also particularly tricky. Fortunately there is great advice for those of you looking to get your home sold during the holiday season (And it doesn't include taking your house off the market).

    Regardless of the time of year, most home stagers will advise a seller to remove as many personal items and decorations as possible, "Less is more." This includes photos, trophies, and even your son's gallery of refrigerator artwork. To you this might make your home feel cold and impersonal, but it allows a potential buyer to envision themselves living in your house—thus upping your odds of making the sale. During the holidays it may be tough to keep your holiday cheer in the attic but it is the easiest way to stage your house as spacious, without blocking pathways or seeming cluttered.

    In addition, it is important to remember that certain cultures might find overtly religious décor off-putting and the best way to remain non-offensive is to avoid decorating altogether. Or another option is to exchange your manger for a basket of pine cones and opt for general fall and winter decorations as opposed to those with religious themes. If you must get religious, be strategic in your placement by displaying your menorah on the ledge of a bay window or dangling mistletoe in an arched doorway. Avoid covering up or down-playing selling features that will sell your home like the fireplace, stairs, and windows. In most cases, sellers are better off with a smaller Christmas tree although a tall, skinnier tree is a great way to draw attention to high cathedral ceilings.

    Another vital pointer to remember during the winter is that most potential buyers start their searches on the internet and real estate magazines, so you want to make sure the best possible photos of your home are available, even if it means hiring a photographer. You can also expect less foot traffic due to inclement weather and vacation plans so it might also be useful to create a video tour of your home to allow house hunters a virtual walk through without braving inclement weather.

    Showing your home over the holidays can be tough, but it's also the perfect opportunity to target serious buyers that have more free time for house hunting- especially while your competition might be taking a break. Additionally, December is deadline for those buyers trying to make an investment before the new fiscal year begins.

    Jim Lowenstern is the President of Castles Unlimited in Newton, MA.


  • Economic Commentary

    Posted Under: Home Buying in Rhode Island, Home Selling in Rhode Island, Financing in Rhode Island  |  December 6, 2011 2:30 PM  |  1,057 views  |  No comments

     

     

    Optimism Creeps Into The Market

    It is quite striking when you compare one week to the next in the financial markets. The 10 days before Thanksgiving were brutal. Stocks were diving, Europe was tipping into chaos and it looked like we were surely heading into another slowdown next quarter. We come back from the Thanksgiving Holiday and we are all brimming with optimism. What happened? Well, first there were very strong Black Friday and Cyber Monday sales reported. Last week we spoke about the importance of the Holiday shopping season with regard to the health of the economy. Next, the world's central banks decided to step up and provide more support for Europe, making it easier for cash-strapped nations to raise capital.

    Finally, we had some positive economic reports released. This past week reports were released on consumer confidence, construction spending and manufacturing and all of these reports exceeded expectations. On top of these reports, the all-important employment releases were also positive. Though many will discount the significant drop in the unemployment rate from 9.0% to 8.6% on temporary factors, there is no doubt about the fact that the number is moving in the right direction from a peak of over 10.0% and the numbers added to payrolls last month were not spectacular, but solid. Bottom line, the markets liked what they saw and the stock market rebounded strongly. This will also help boost confidence and confidence is exactly what we need right now. Of course, it would be nice if we had at least a few months of this good news instead of the wild swings back and forth. The question will be -- how long will these record low rates hold if the good news continues?

     

    On November 18, 2011, the President signed into law the Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act 2012. This law re-establishes the higher FHA loan limits in high-cost areas which expired October 1 of this year. Previously, the Economic Stimulus Act of 2008 set higher limits for conforming and FHA loans in high cost areas because of limited availability of jumbo mortgages in the wake of the financial crisis. Why is this important to present and prospective homeowners? In higher cost areas, while jumbo mortgages are now available again, they are not available with the low rates and low down payment requirements of FHA mortgages. For example, many jumbo programs require a 20% down payment and FHA only requires a 3.5% down payment. That is quite a difference for those whose mortgages are over the present conforming high-cost limit of $625,500. The extended FHA high-cost limits go up to $729,750. FHA is available for both purchasing a home and refinancing your present home. You must live in the property you purchase if you are using FHA. If you are thinking about purchasing a home or refinancing and you want to know if the new extended FHA loan limits could help you, please contact us.

    Ultra-low interest rates mixed with stabilizing home prices continued to push housing affordability in the third quarter near its highest levels in more than two decades, according to the latest National Association of Home Builders Housing Opportunity Index. For the third quarter, 72.9 percent of all homes sold were affordable to families earning the national median income of $64,200, according to the index. This marks the 11th consecutive quarter that the affordability measure was above 70 percent; prior to this it rarely was above 60 percent. 'With interest rates at historically low levels and markets across the country beginning to improve, home ownership is within reach of more households than it has been for nearly two decades,' Bob Nielsen, chairman of the National Association of Home Builders, said in a statement. Source: National Association of Home Builders

    There are several tax credits and deductions set to expire at the end of the year, and given the federal deficit problem, there's a good chance they won't be extended. If you want to take advantage of them, you need to act before Jan. 1, 2012. Here are a few that affect homeowners...

    • Mortgage insurance premium deduction. If you itemize deductions, you may deduct the premiums you pay for mortgage insurance, just like you do mortgage interest. However, this deduction is phased out if your income exceeds certain levels. To qualify for the full deduction, a couple or a single taxpayer must have an adjusted gross income of $100,000 or less. The deduction is phased out completely if AGI exceeds $109,000. This deduction, which was first enacted for 2007, is scheduled to expire at the end of 2011. Thus, your payments are deductible only if you pay them during 2011; a payment after 2011 is not deductible.
    • Home energy credit. First, any homeowner may qualify for an energy credit of up to $500. You can qualify for the credit if you purchase during 2011 solar panels to generate electricity or for water heating, or install wind energy equipment, a geothermal heat pump, or certain types of fuel cells to generate electricity. The credit is up to 30 percent of the amount you spend, up to the $500 limit. This credit is not available for purchases in 2012.Source: Inman News

     

     

    Please, do not hesitate to contact me with any questions or concerns.

    Thank you , 
    Bethany J. Levin

         

    Mortgage Consultant
    NorthPoint Mortgage, Inc 
    License #14169

    bethanylevin@cox.net

    PHONE 401-465-9003 E-FAX 401-633-6060

    www.trynorthpoint.com

    2011 Five Star Professional award


    Articles and commentary are provided for general information only and should not be relied on as legal or financial advice. Opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the opinions of
     NorthPoint Mortgage.

  • Economists Predict Positive Growth in 2012

    Posted Under: Market Conditions in Rhode Island, Home Buying in Rhode Island, Home Selling in Rhode Island  |  December 5, 2011 1:49 PM  |  1,005 views  |  No comments
    Frank Hopton
    11 West Park Street
    Telephone: (401) 635-2242Providence, Rhode Island 02908
    Email: fhopton@HearthStoneInspections.comwww.HearthStoneInspections.com

     

« Read older posts
 
Copyright © 2014 Trulia, Inc. All rights reserved.   |  
Have a question? Visit our Help Center to find the answer