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Michael Kiefer's Blog

By Michael Kiefer | Agent in District of Columbia...

Getting the Home Ready for an Energy Audit

Energy audits are one of those eye opening exercises for most home owners and especially if you have just completed a bunch of repairs or purchased a newly renovated home.  Just because the home you purchased has been all renovated does not necessarily equate to the most energy efficient home possible.

They say knowing is half the battle and so an energy audit is precisely the tool that you will need to give you the full picture on where all that energy is escaping!

As the heading alludes to getting the home ready for an energy audit is exactly what you need to do.

I spoke with a local energy auditor here in Washington DC, EcoHouse and they shared with me the following tips to get you ready.

                                    Preparing for Your Home Energy Audit

To ensure that your home energy audit goes smoothly, please perform the
following steps prior to arrival of the energy auditor.

The audit will take 1.5 to 2 hours and we need your participation for the first and last 10 minutes

Full Report  – Preparing for Your DC Home Energy Audit

  • Take note of any broken or defective windows and doors

  • Take note of any drafty areas or rooms that are always too hot or too cold

  • Remove clutter and obstructions around the water heater, AC units, and furnaces

  • Close all windows (lock them as well) and outside doors

  • Shut fireplace dampers, fireplace doors and wood stove air intakes

  • Remove all ashes from the fireplace(s)

  • Please have a copy of your Pepco and Washington Gas bills handy (or the last

  • 12 months consumption figures i.e. kWh/month and therms/month)

  • Remove anything you do not want your home energy auditor to see. The auditor will need to go into every room and closet in your house as well as the attic, basement and crawl space.

  • The Simplified Audit and Report Process

  • Homeowner interview (ID issues, problems, and house specifics)

  • Brief tour of house

  • Measure house components

  • Identify and record house systems (heating, cooling, hot water)

  • Identify health/safety, comfort, and efficiency items

  • Prepare house for diagnostics (turn on/off house systems)

  • Run diagnostic tests (blower door – conditions permitting)

  • Brief review of findings

    For Additional Details Contact:

    Zach Dobelbower

  • LEED AP | BPI Building Analyst | HERS Rater

    Barrack’s Row | 808 L Street SE | Washington, DC 20003 | www.ecohouseusa.com

    o. 202.640.2820 | m.202.372.6381 | f. 202.204.8615 | zach@ecohouseusa.com

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