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By Jason Byram | Agent in Tipp City, OH
  • Why Rent? To get rich!

    Posted Under: Home Buying  |  August 15, 2011 12:51 PM  |  153 views  |  No comments

    Why rent? To get richer

    A contrarian's view: Houses don't appreciate any faster than the level of inflation over the long term, so forget about buying a home and put your savings into stocks.

    By SmartMoney

    I have something un-American to confess: I rent an apartment despite having enough money to buy a house. I plan to keep renting for as long as I can. I'm not just holding out for better prices. Renting will make me richer.

    I normally write about stocks for SmartMoney.com, but the boss asked me to explain to readers my reason for renting. Here goes: Businesses are great investments while houses are poor ones, so I'd rather rent the latter and own the former.

    Questions and objections

    In what follows I've tried to anticipate and address questions and objections:

    "You can't live in your stocks" or "Renters throw money down the drain."

    Rent is the cost of owning shares with money you would otherwise spend on a house. Houses have ownership costs, too: taxes, insurance and maintenance. Rent costs about 5% of house prices each year if we apply the price-rent ratio of 19. House incidentals often cost around 2%.

    If you have $300,000 and a choice between spending it on a house or shares, you'll pay $6,000 a year in incidentals if you buy the house or about $15,000 a year ($1,250 a month) in rent if you buy the shares. But the shares will return $21,000 a year after inflation while the house will return zero. (My numbers work out even better than these. I pay a smidgen less than $1,250 a month for rent, while house prices in my neighborhood are far higher than $300,000.)

    Note that houses and shares have transaction costs, too. Homebuyers pay around 1% in closing costs when they buy and 6% in broker commissions when they sell. Share buyers pay $10 trading commissions, which are negligible for buy-and-hold investors.

    "Homebuyers get tax breaks."

    So do share buyers, but both are a bad deal. The interest on loans for houses (mortgages) and shares (margin balances) is tax-deductible. But the rates are almost always too high. A big house loan presently costs 6.1% interest, while a big stock loan costs about 9%. For the returns, we can forget about inflation because it helps debtors while hurting investors, making it a wash for those who borrow to invest. Still, nominal returns of 3% for houses and 10% for stocks aren't high enough to justify those rates. The tax breaks aren't really breaks at all. Moreover, a majority of homeowners don't claim them. Their incomes are low enough to make the standard deduction a better deal.

    "What about the pride of homeownership?"

    It's not for me. I define ownership as no longer having to pay for something and being able to do as I please with it. I own my coffee maker. Homeowners must pay taxes each year even when their mortgage payments are done. In certain markets they can't even make changes to the houses they've paid for without seeking the approval of others. Personally, I feel the pride of ownership for shares of businesses, and I'm proud to occupy a nice place while leaving the burden and poor returns and maintenance to someone else.

    "You seem to knock government housing subsidies, but they've helped many Americans afford homes."

    My inner socialist agrees. My other inner socialist worries that the government has effectively raised prices to the point where the middle class can't afford houses or buries itself in debt to own them. My inner capitalist is too busy watching shares to care about house prices. My inner conspiracy theorist notes that while politicians tout the social benefits of homeownership, none mentions its tax benefits to the government. I pay no taxes on the overall value of my stock portfolio, just on my cashed-in gains and collected dividends. But Americans pay taxes on the full $11 trillion worth of housing they own plus the $10 trillion worth of it they're still paying off.

    "Houses are bigger than apartments."

    True, and both can be rented. A third of renters live in single-family houses. I prefer an apartment for now. I like not having to fill it with stuff. I like using a fifth of the energy of the average American. I like being 20 minutes from work and not having owned a car in 10 years. I like not stressing over whether to get the marble countertops or the imported tiles or the 52-inch flat screen. I'm not especially frugal; I spend a teacher's salary each year on restaurants and travel. But I guess I'm too busy or lazy right now to bother with a big house and its innards.

    "Are you saying I should sell my big house and rent an apartment instead?"

    No, unless you have more space than you need and moving wouldn't be disruptive to your family, and you want to cash in on recent housing gains, make more money over the next couple of decades, use less energy while simplifying your life, and you don't mind seeming odd to friends. In which case, yes. But really, I'm not trying to win anyone over. Strong demand for houses keeps my rent cheap.

    "Renting is for poor people."

    True. But it's for rich people, too. The average renter makes about $34,000 a year, but while the percentage of renters declines after incomes exceed $20,000 and rents exceed $600 a month, it jumps again once incomes top $150,000 and rents top $1,200 a month. In other words, poor people rent modest apartments for lack of choice. Middle-income people buy houses. High-income people, presumably with a dose of financial savvy, often rent nice apartments instead of buying.

    "You say houses return zero. But I've made a fortune on my house in recent years."

    I'm referring to inflation-adjusted returns over long periods, absent external boosts to demand. You're referring to gross returns over a short time period that combined lax borrowing standards and ultra-low interest rates. Over the next 20 years I believe houses will return zero or slightly less after inflation, and that stocks will return 7%.

    "So you're never going to buy a house? What about raising a family?"

    I might buy one eventually, but the longer I can put it off the more I'll get out of the shares I'll have to sell to afford it. I'm 34 now with a fiancée and a fish. I'm going to try to rent for at least 10 more years. If I have kids I'll probably move into a big apartment or a house once they reach running-around age. I'll rent, most likely.

    This article was reported and written by Jack Hough for SmartMoney.

     

    Dayton Ohio: Real Estate and Property Management

     

    Jason Byram at CONNECT REALTY.COM is with one of the most dynamic and innovative Real Estate companies in Ohio. He specializes in helping buyers and sellers invest or lease single family homes in Tipp City, Troy, Vandalia, Huber Heights, Union, Englewood, Clayton, West Milton, Bradford, Dayton, Piqua, Brookville and other surrounding areas.

    (937) 469-4399

  • Why Rent? To Get Rich!

    Posted Under: Home Buying  |  August 15, 2011 12:50 PM  |  132 views  |  No comments

    Why rent? To get richer

    A contrarian's view: Houses don't appreciate any faster than the level of inflation over the long term, so forget about buying a home and put your savings into stocks.

    By SmartMoney

    I have something un-American to confess: I rent an apartment despite having enough money to buy a house. I plan to keep renting for as long as I can. I'm not just holding out for better prices. Renting will make me richer.

    I normally write about stocks for SmartMoney.com, but the boss asked me to explain to readers my reason for renting. Here goes: Businesses are great investments while houses are poor ones, so I'd rather rent the latter and own the former.

    Questions and objections

    In what follows I've tried to anticipate and address questions and objections:

    "You can't live in your stocks" or "Renters throw money down the drain."

    Rent is the cost of owning shares with money you would otherwise spend on a house. Houses have ownership costs, too: taxes, insurance and maintenance. Rent costs about 5% of house prices each year if we apply the price-rent ratio of 19. House incidentals often cost around 2%.

    If you have $300,000 and a choice between spending it on a house or shares, you'll pay $6,000 a year in incidentals if you buy the house or about $15,000 a year ($1,250 a month) in rent if you buy the shares. But the shares will return $21,000 a year after inflation while the house will return zero. (My numbers work out even better than these. I pay a smidgen less than $1,250 a month for rent, while house prices in my neighborhood are far higher than $300,000.)

    Note that houses and shares have transaction costs, too. Homebuyers pay around 1% in closing costs when they buy and 6% in broker commissions when they sell. Share buyers pay $10 trading commissions, which are negligible for buy-and-hold investors.

    "Homebuyers get tax breaks."

    So do share buyers, but both are a bad deal. The interest on loans for houses (mortgages) and shares (margin balances) is tax-deductible. But the rates are almost always too high. A big house loan presently costs 6.1% interest, while a big stock loan costs about 9%. For the returns, we can forget about inflation because it helps debtors while hurting investors, making it a wash for those who borrow to invest. Still, nominal returns of 3% for houses and 10% for stocks aren't high enough to justify those rates. The tax breaks aren't really breaks at all. Moreover, a majority of homeowners don't claim them. Their incomes are low enough to make the standard deduction a better deal.

    "What about the pride of homeownership?"

    It's not for me. I define ownership as no longer having to pay for something and being able to do as I please with it. I own my coffee maker. Homeowners must pay taxes each year even when their mortgage payments are done. In certain markets they can't even make changes to the houses they've paid for without seeking the approval of others. Personally, I feel the pride of ownership for shares of businesses, and I'm proud to occupy a nice place while leaving the burden and poor returns and maintenance to someone else.

    "You seem to knock government housing subsidies, but they've helped many Americans afford homes."

    My inner socialist agrees. My other inner socialist worries that the government has effectively raised prices to the point where the middle class can't afford houses or buries itself in debt to own them. My inner capitalist is too busy watching shares to care about house prices. My inner conspiracy theorist notes that while politicians tout the social benefits of homeownership, none mentions its tax benefits to the government. I pay no taxes on the overall value of my stock portfolio, just on my cashed-in gains and collected dividends. But Americans pay taxes on the full $11 trillion worth of housing they own plus the $10 trillion worth of it they're still paying off.

    "Houses are bigger than apartments."

    True, and both can be rented. A third of renters live in single-family houses. I prefer an apartment for now. I like not having to fill it with stuff. I like using a fifth of the energy of the average American. I like being 20 minutes from work and not having owned a car in 10 years. I like not stressing over whether to get the marble countertops or the imported tiles or the 52-inch flat screen. I'm not especially frugal; I spend a teacher's salary each year on restaurants and travel. But I guess I'm too busy or lazy right now to bother with a big house and its innards.

    "Are you saying I should sell my big house and rent an apartment instead?"

    No, unless you have more space than you need and moving wouldn't be disruptive to your family, and you want to cash in on recent housing gains, make more money over the next couple of decades, use less energy while simplifying your life, and you don't mind seeming odd to friends. In which case, yes. But really, I'm not trying to win anyone over. Strong demand for houses keeps my rent cheap.

    "Renting is for poor people."

    True. But it's for rich people, too. The average renter makes about $34,000 a year, but while the percentage of renters declines after incomes exceed $20,000 and rents exceed $600 a month, it jumps again once incomes top $150,000 and rents top $1,200 a month. In other words, poor people rent modest apartments for lack of choice. Middle-income people buy houses. High-income people, presumably with a dose of financial savvy, often rent nice apartments instead of buying.

    "You say houses return zero. But I've made a fortune on my house in recent years."

    I'm referring to inflation-adjusted returns over long periods, absent external boosts to demand. You're referring to gross returns over a short time period that combined lax borrowing standards and ultra-low interest rates. Over the next 20 years I believe houses will return zero or slightly less after inflation, and that stocks will return 7%.

    "So you're never going to buy a house? What about raising a family?"

    I might buy one eventually, but the longer I can put it off the more I'll get out of the shares I'll have to sell to afford it. I'm 34 now with a fiancée and a fish. I'm going to try to rent for at least 10 more years. If I have kids I'll probably move into a big apartment or a house once they reach running-around age. I'll rent, most likely.

    This article was reported and written by Jack Hough for SmartMoney.

     

    Dayton Ohio: Real Estate and Property Management

     

    Jason Byram at CONNECT REALTY.COM is with one of the most dynamic and innovative Real Estate companies in Ohio. He specializes in helping buyers and sellers invest or lease single family homes in Tipp City, Troy, Vandalia, Huber Heights, Union, Englewood, Clayton, West Milton, Bradford, Dayton, Piqua, Brookville and other surrounding areas.

    (937) 469-4399

  • Why Rent? To Get Rich!

    Posted Under: Home Buying  |  August 15, 2011 12:50 PM  |  185 views  |  No comments

    Why rent? To get richer

    A contrarian's view: Houses don't appreciate any faster than the level of inflation over the long term, so forget about buying a home and put your savings into stocks.

    By SmartMoney

    I have something un-American to confess: I rent an apartment despite having enough money to buy a house. I plan to keep renting for as long as I can. I'm not just holding out for better prices. Renting will make me richer.

    I normally write about stocks for SmartMoney.com, but the boss asked me to explain to readers my reason for renting. Here goes: Businesses are great investments while houses are poor ones, so I'd rather rent the latter and own the former.

    Questions and objections

    In what follows I've tried to anticipate and address questions and objections:

    "You can't live in your stocks" or "Renters throw money down the drain."

    Rent is the cost of owning shares with money you would otherwise spend on a house. Houses have ownership costs, too: taxes, insurance and maintenance. Rent costs about 5% of house prices each year if we apply the price-rent ratio of 19. House incidentals often cost around 2%.

    If you have $300,000 and a choice between spending it on a house or shares, you'll pay $6,000 a year in incidentals if you buy the house or about $15,000 a year ($1,250 a month) in rent if you buy the shares. But the shares will return $21,000 a year after inflation while the house will return zero. (My numbers work out even better than these. I pay a smidgen less than $1,250 a month for rent, while house prices in my neighborhood are far higher than $300,000.)

    Note that houses and shares have transaction costs, too. Homebuyers pay around 1% in closing costs when they buy and 6% in broker commissions when they sell. Share buyers pay $10 trading commissions, which are negligible for buy-and-hold investors.

    "Homebuyers get tax breaks."

    So do share buyers, but both are a bad deal. The interest on loans for houses (mortgages) and shares (margin balances) is tax-deductible. But the rates are almost always too high. A big house loan presently costs 6.1% interest, while a big stock loan costs about 9%. For the returns, we can forget about inflation because it helps debtors while hurting investors, making it a wash for those who borrow to invest. Still, nominal returns of 3% for houses and 10% for stocks aren't high enough to justify those rates. The tax breaks aren't really breaks at all. Moreover, a majority of homeowners don't claim them. Their incomes are low enough to make the standard deduction a better deal.

    "What about the pride of homeownership?"

    It's not for me. I define ownership as no longer having to pay for something and being able to do as I please with it. I own my coffee maker. Homeowners must pay taxes each year even when their mortgage payments are done. In certain markets they can't even make changes to the houses they've paid for without seeking the approval of others. Personally, I feel the pride of ownership for shares of businesses, and I'm proud to occupy a nice place while leaving the burden and poor returns and maintenance to someone else.

    "You seem to knock government housing subsidies, but they've helped many Americans afford homes."

    My inner socialist agrees. My other inner socialist worries that the government has effectively raised prices to the point where the middle class can't afford houses or buries itself in debt to own them. My inner capitalist is too busy watching shares to care about house prices. My inner conspiracy theorist notes that while politicians tout the social benefits of homeownership, none mentions its tax benefits to the government. I pay no taxes on the overall value of my stock portfolio, just on my cashed-in gains and collected dividends. But Americans pay taxes on the full $11 trillion worth of housing they own plus the $10 trillion worth of it they're still paying off.

    "Houses are bigger than apartments."

    True, and both can be rented. A third of renters live in single-family houses. I prefer an apartment for now. I like not having to fill it with stuff. I like using a fifth of the energy of the average American. I like being 20 minutes from work and not having owned a car in 10 years. I like not stressing over whether to get the marble countertops or the imported tiles or the 52-inch flat screen. I'm not especially frugal; I spend a teacher's salary each year on restaurants and travel. But I guess I'm too busy or lazy right now to bother with a big house and its innards.

    "Are you saying I should sell my big house and rent an apartment instead?"

    No, unless you have more space than you need and moving wouldn't be disruptive to your family, and you want to cash in on recent housing gains, make more money over the next couple of decades, use less energy while simplifying your life, and you don't mind seeming odd to friends. In which case, yes. But really, I'm not trying to win anyone over. Strong demand for houses keeps my rent cheap.

    "Renting is for poor people."

    True. But it's for rich people, too. The average renter makes about $34,000 a year, but while the percentage of renters declines after incomes exceed $20,000 and rents exceed $600 a month, it jumps again once incomes top $150,000 and rents top $1,200 a month. In other words, poor people rent modest apartments for lack of choice. Middle-income people buy houses. High-income people, presumably with a dose of financial savvy, often rent nice apartments instead of buying.

    "You say houses return zero. But I've made a fortune on my house in recent years."

    I'm referring to inflation-adjusted returns over long periods, absent external boosts to demand. You're referring to gross returns over a short time period that combined lax borrowing standards and ultra-low interest rates. Over the next 20 years I believe houses will return zero or slightly less after inflation, and that stocks will return 7%.

    "So you're never going to buy a house? What about raising a family?"

    I might buy one eventually, but the longer I can put it off the more I'll get out of the shares I'll have to sell to afford it. I'm 34 now with a fiancée and a fish. I'm going to try to rent for at least 10 more years. If I have kids I'll probably move into a big apartment or a house once they reach running-around age. I'll rent, most likely.

    This article was reported and written by Jack Hough for SmartMoney.

     

    Dayton Ohio: Real Estate and Property Management

     

    Jason Byram at CONNECT REALTY.COM is with one of the most dynamic and innovative Real Estate companies in Ohio. He specializes in helping buyers and sellers invest or lease single family homes in Tipp City, Troy, Vandalia, Huber Heights, Union, Englewood, Clayton, West Milton, Bradford, Dayton, Piqua, Brookville and other surrounding areas.

    (937) 469-4399

  • HOUSING AND ECONOMIC FORCAST POINTS TO RISING ACTIVITY

    Posted Under: Home Buying in Dayton, Home Selling in Dayton, Financing in Dayton  |  July 26, 2011 10:47 AM  |  254 views  |  No comments

    HOUSING AND ECONOMIC FORCAST POINTS TO RISING ACTIVITY

     

     

    WASHINGTON, May 12, 2011

    Home sales are expected to stay on an uptrend through 2012, although the performance will be uneven with mortgage constraints weighing on the market, according to experts at a residential real estate forum today at the Realtors® Midyear Legislative Meetings & Trade Expo here.

    Lawrence Yun, NAR chief economist, said existing-home sales have been underperforming by historical standards and will rise gradually but unevenly. “If we just hold at the first-quarter sales pace of 5.1 million, sales this year would rise 4 percent, but the remainder of the year looks better,” Yun said. “We expect 5.3 million existing-home sales this year, up from 4.9 million in 2010, with additional gains in 2012 to about 5.6 million – that’s a sustainable level given the size of our population.”

    Mortgage interest rates should rise gradually to 5.5 percent by the end of the year and average 6.0 percent in 2012 – still relatively affordable by historic standards.

    “A huge volume of cash sales, supported by the recovery in the stock market, show that smart money is chasing real estate. This implies that there could be a sizeable pent-up demand if mortgages become more readily accessible for qualified buyers,” Yun said. “The problem isn’t with interest rates, but with the continuation of unnecessarily tight credit standards that are keeping many creditworthy buyers from getting a loan despite extraordinarily low default rates over the past two years.”

    Yun said that if credit requirements returned to normal, safe standards, home sales would be 15 to 20 percent higher. He added that some parents are buying homes with cash for their children, and offering them loans which provide better returns than bank accounts or CDs.

    Yun projects the Gross Domestic Product to grow 2.5 percent this year and 2.7 percent in 2012, adding 1.5 million to 2 million jobs yearly over the next two years. The unemployment rate should decline to 8.8 percent by the end of 2011 and average 8.6 percent next year, returning to a normal level of 6 percent around 2015.

    Housing starts are forecast to rise but remain below long-term trends, reaching 603,000 in 2011, up from 595,000 last year, and continue growing to 908,000 in 2012. New-home sales are seen at a record low 320,000 this year, rising to 487,000 in 2012. “A recovery in new homes will be slow because of the extra price discount in the existing home market,” Yun noted. In March, the typical new single-family home cost $53,300 more than an existing home.
    Inflation appears to be relatively modest for now, with the Consumer Price Index rising 2.9 percent this year. “We’ll be closely watching the impact of fuel costs on consumer spending and inflation – that would slow economic growth, job creation and home sales,” Yun said.

    Apartment rents are trending up, and are likely to rise at faster rates as vacancies decline. Following the correction in home prices, it has now become more affordable to buy in most of the country. “Twice as many renters had enough income to buy a home in 2010 in comparison with 2005, so we have a much larger pool of financially qualified renters,” Yun said. “Rising rents and excellent housing affordability conditions will encourage potential buyers who’ve been on the sidelines.”

    Yun expects the median existing-home price to remain near $170,000 over the next two years, which would mark four consecutive years of essentially no meaningful price change.

    Frank Nothaft, chief economist at Freddie Mac, holds similar views on the outlook. “Economic activity will accelerate this year – there will be no double dip in the economy,” he said. Nothaft is more optimistic on job growth, expecting 2.0 million to 2.5 million jobs created in 2011 with unemployment dropping to 8.4 percent by the end of the year.

    Nothaft expects the 30-year fixed-rate mortgage to trend up to 5.25 percent by the end of the year, and for home sales to rise 5 percent. “National home price indices are close to a bottom and prices are likely to bottom sometime this year,” he said.

    Refinancing activity in 2011 will be only half of what it was last year. “As a result, banks may become more willing to lend to home buyers,” Nothaft said.

    The National Association of Realtors®, “The Voice for Real Estate,” is America’s largest trade association, representing 1.1 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries.

    Information about NAR is available at www.realtor.org. This and other news releases are posted in the News Media section. Statistical data, tables and surveys also may be found by clicking on Research.

    This article was blogged by Jason Byram.  I am happy to have lived in Northern Dayton Ohio most of my life. I have a beautiful wife and 7 amazing children. I am a member of Ginghamsburg Church in Tipp City where I run a cycling ministry called Shifting Gears. Prior to my sales career, I spent a 10 years in the special forces for the US Navy. My hobbies include mountain biking, cycling, camping, endurance racing, and family events. 

    I own my own property management company called FREEDOM HOME MANAGEMENT and also currently employed by Exit Realty Partners, who is one of the most dynamic and innovative Real Estate companies in Ohio. I specialize in helping buyers and sellers invest or lease single family homes in Tipp City, Troy, Vandalia, Huber Heights, Union, Englewood, Clayton, West Milton, Bradford, Dayton, Piqua, Brookville and other surrounding areas. I can be reached anytime at (937) 469-4399 or at freedomhomemanagement.com.   

     

  • Distressed Properties Comprise Smaller Share of Declining Home Resales

    Posted Under: Home Selling in Dayton  |  July 26, 2011 10:46 AM  |  210 views  |  No comments

    Distressed Properties Comprise Smaller Share of Declining Home Resales

     

     

    Foreclosures and short sales made up 30 percent of all existing-home sales in June, according to data released Wednesday by the National Association of Realtors (NAR).

     

    The market share for distressed properties, as anticipated, has been steadily dwindling with the onset of warmer weather. In May, foreclosures and short sales accounted for 31 percent of home resales. As recently as April their share was 37 percent, and in March it was 40 percent.

    Overall sales volume slipped in June along with the share of distressed properties. NAR says total existing-home sales declined 0.8 percent to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 4.77 million in June, down from 4.81 million in May.

    The decline was expected by some analysts after the 11 percent drop in pending home sales recorded in April (pending sales numbers generally manifest two months down the road).

    June’s sales pace of 4.77 million for the year is the lowest it’s been since last November. Without a convincing rebound in the months ahead, 2011 is in step to be the fourth time in the last five years where home sales have declined on an annual basis. There were 4.90 million existing homes sold in 2010, according to NAR’s data.

    The Realtor group blamed June’s disappointing results, at least in part, on a large number of sales contracts that have fallen through.

    “Home sales had been trending up without a tax stimulus, but a variety of issues are weighing on the market including an unusual spike in contract cancellations in the past month,” said Lawrence Yun, NAR’s chief economist.

    “The underlying reason for elevated cancellations is unclear, but with problems including tight credit and low appraisals, 16 percent of NAR members report a sales contract was cancelled in June, up from 4 percent in May, which stands out in contrast with the pattern over the past year,” Yun said.

    Ron Phipps, NAR’s president, added that lower mortgage loan limits, due to go into effect on October 1, already are having an impact.

    “Some lenders are placing lower loan limits on current contracts in anticipation they may not close before the end of September,” Phipps said. “As a result, some contracts may be getting cancelled because certain buyers are unwilling or unable to obtain a more costly jumbo mortgage.”

    With fewer discounted, distressed properties trading hands, NAR’s data showed that the national median existing-home price rose to $184,300 in June, up more than 10 percent from May and up 0.8 percent from a year earlier.

    Total housing inventory at the end of June rose 3.3 percent to 3.77 million existing homes available for sale, which represents a 9.5-month supply at the current sales pace. That’s up from a 9.1-month supply in May.

     

    This article was blogged by Jason Byram.  I am happy to have lived in Northern Dayton Ohio most of my life. I have a beautiful wife and 7 amazing children. I am a member of Ginghamsburg Church in Tipp City where I run a cycling ministry called Shifting Gears. Prior to my sales career, I spent a 10 years in the special forces for the US Navy. My hobbies include mountain biking, cycling, camping, endurance racing, and family events. 

    I own my own property management company called FREEDOM HOME MANAGEMENT and also currently employed by Exit Realty Partners, who is one of the most dynamic and innovative Real Estate companies in Ohio. I specialize in helping buyers and sellers invest or lease single family homes in Tipp City, Troy, Vandalia, Huber Heights, Union, Englewood, Clayton, West Milton, Bradford, Dayton, Piqua, Brookville and other surrounding areas. I can be reached anytime at (937) 469-4399 or at freedomhomemanagement.com.   

     

     

  • Thunderbirds come to Dayton Air Show

    Posted Under: General Area in Dayton, Shopping & Local Amenities in Dayton, Home Buying in Dayton  |  July 20, 2011 12:11 PM  |  273 views  |  No comments

    Here Come the Thunderbirds
    The world-renowned United States Air Force Thunderbirds will make a triumphant return to Dayton for the 2011 Vectren Dayton Air Show. Pushing their F-16 Fighting Falcons to the limit in a display of speed, skill, power and precision, the Thunderbirds will thrill you with their legendary show. Sit back and relax as the Thunderbirds entertain while demonstrating the extreme capabilities of the Air Force’s premiere flight demonstration team.
    About the Dayton Air Show
    The Air Show tickets are good for General Admission ($20 value each) on either Saturday or Sunday July 23 or 24th, 2011. Gates open Daily at 9AM.
     
    Dayton Ohio Real Estate/Property Management- Jason Byram
    Exit Realty Partners is one of the dynamic and innovative Real Estate companies in Ohio. I specialize in helping buyers and sellers invest or lease single family homes in Tipp City, Troy, Vandalia, Huber Heights, Union, Englewood, Clayton, West Milton, Bradford, Dayton, Piqua, Brookville and other surrounding areas.
    (937) 469-4399
     
  • You'll want to move to Ohio for this!

    Posted Under: General Area in Tipp City, Home Selling in Tipp City, Agent2Agent in Tipp City  |  July 7, 2011 8:24 AM  |  290 views  |  No comments

    7640 Whispering Oakes Trail
    Tipp City, Ohio 45371
     
    Absolutely stunning 7 bedroom, 5 bathroom home available in Tipp City.  Gorgeous wooded lot for views of nature and wildlife every season.  Over 7200 finished square feet for your living enjoyment.  No stone left unturned when this 2001 home was built.  9' ceilings, built in bookcases, 42" cabinetry, trey ceilings, custom fluted columns, central stereo throughout the home, central vac and full finished walk out basement are just a few of the details that make this home functional and beautiful.  Highlighting the main living room is a grandeur staircase spiriling to the 2nd level.  Focal point of the massive chef's kitchen is a hand built stone fireplace and custom dining room with views of the woods.  Full finished basement has work out area, rec room, wet bar, bedroom and plenty of storage.  Master bedroom is on the main level of the home, with 5 bedrooms up and 1 down.  Jack and Jill bathrooms unite some of the bedrooms.  Formal study off the main entry is an executive's masterpiece.  Call Freedom Home Management today for more info on this stunning home.  Freedom Home Management, property management for single family homes.
     
    Dayton Ohio
    Real Estate/Property Management
    Jason Byram at Exit Realty Partners
    is one of the dynamic and innovative Real Estate companies in Ohio. I specialize in helping buyers and sellers invest or lease single family homes in Tipp City, Troy, Vandalia, Huber Heights, Union, Englewood, Clayton, West Milton, Bradford, Dayton, Piqua, Brookville and other surrounding areas.
    (937) 469-4399
 
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