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Frank Dolski's Blog

By Frank Dolski Associate Broker | Agent in 18901
  • Fire Safety! How Safe Is Your Home?

    Posted Under: Crime & Safety in District of Columbia, Home Buying in District of Columbia, Home Ownership in District of Columbia  |  October 14, 2014 4:53 AM  |  277 views  |  No comments

    My Name is Frank Dolski, Associate Broker with Coldwell Banker Hearthside Realtors in Lahaska, PA.  I represent buyers and sellers of Real Estate in Bucks, Montgomery, Lehigh, Philadelphia and the Chester County Area in Pennsylvania.  Towns like Doylestown, Buckingham, Yardley, Newtown, New HopeJamison

    North Wales and Langhorne are only a few of the areas where I represent clients.  One thing for sure, is that I meet many new people some first time home buyers as well as seasoned buyers and I learn new information regarding home ownership each and every day.

    So how safe is your home from a fire? Do you have adequate protection and do you have an evacuation plan in case of a fire?

    Smoke Detectors

    Smoke detectors are one of the things that I have seen homebuyers take for granted or in many cases, they are just not educated. For example, when I preview a home for sale I have noticed missing smoke detectors, ones that are beeping and an inadequate supply installed within a home. The fact is that a missing or unconnected detector may just be needed to save your life someday. A single battery smoke detector not connected in line with all of the other detectors is merely useless as what happens if a fire occurs in another part of your home?

    The Solution

    Of course education, awareness and safe practices are key but according to the National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA), “Installing your smoke alarms correctly- and making sure they are in working order- is an important step in making your home and family safer from fire”. Listed below are just a few of the general recommendations by NFPA:

     

    • For the best protection, interconnect all smoke alarms. When one smoke alarm sounds they all sound. Interconnection can be done using hard-wiring or wireless technology.
    • When interconnected smoke alarms are installed, it is important that all of the alarms are from the same manufacturer. If the alarms are not compatible, they may not sound.
    • There are two types of smoke alarms – ionization and photoelectric. An ionization smoke alarm is generally more responsive to flaming fires, and a photoelectric smoke alarm is generally more responsive to smoldering fires. For the best protection, both types of alarms or combination ionization-photoelectric alarms, also known as dual sensor smoke alarms, are recommended.
    • Choose smoke alarms that have the label of a recognized testing laboratory.
    • Install smoke alarms inside each bedroom, outside each sleeping area and on every level of the home, including the basement.
    • On levels without bedrooms, install alarms in the living room (or den or family room) or near the stairway to the upper level, or in both locations.
    • Smoke alarms installed in the basement should be installed on the ceiling at the bottom of the stairs leading to the next level.
    • Smoke alarms should be installed at least 10 feet (3 meters) from a cooking appliance to minimize false alarms when cooking.
    • Mount smoke alarms high on walls or ceilings (remember, smoke rises). Wall-mounted alarms should be installed not more than 12 inches away from the ceiling (to the top of the alarm).
    • If you have ceilings that are pitched, install the alarm within 3 feet of the peak but not within the apex of the peak (four inches down from the peak).

     

    Needless to say, disregarding general fire safety recommendations and in many cases, township and local code could cause a loss of life and valuable property. You should also have an organized plan to evacuate your home if a fire occurs. According to NFPA, everyone should have a plan including an escape route, have a meeting place outside and practice the plan! They also advise that your children and other residents should know the plan well if you are not around or in case you are injured. Of course, call 911 as soon as possible! Always remember, “Safety First”!  Being proactive in terms of fire safety should be of utmost important to every homeowner. A building can be replaced but a life cannot!

    Learn as much as you can about fire safety as there are many resources to increase your education and knowledge!

    Frank Dolski   MBA, ABR, e-PRO
    Associate Broker
    Certified Relocation Specialist
    Previews Luxury Home Specialist
    Coldwell Banker Hearthside Realtors
    Ranked #1 In The State of PA in 2012
    For Coldwell Banker International Affiliated Realtors

    2012 Coldwell Banker International President’s Elite Award
    2010-2011 Coldwell Banker International President’s Circle Award
    215-803-3237 (mobile)
    215-794-1070 x-103
    f.dolski@cbhearthside.com
    www.FrankDolski.Com

  • Fire Safety! How Safe Is Your Home?

    Posted Under: Crime & Safety in Furlong, Home Buying in Furlong, Home Ownership in Furlong  |  October 14, 2014 4:51 AM  |  276 views  |  No comments

    My Name is Frank Dolski, Associate Broker with Coldwell Banker Hearthside Realtors in Lahaska, PA.  I represent buyers and sellers of Real Estate in Bucks, Montgomery, Lehigh, Philadelphia and the Chester County Area in Pennsylvania.  Towns like Doylestown, Buckingham, Yardley, Newtown, New HopeJamison

    North Wales and Langhorne are only a few of the areas where I represent clients.  One thing for sure, is that I meet many new people some first time home buyers as well as seasoned buyers and I learn new information regarding home ownership each and every day.

    So how safe is your home from a fire? Do you have adequate protection and do you have an evacuation plan in case of a fire?

    Smoke Detectors

    Smoke detectors are one of the things that I have seen homebuyers take for granted or in many cases, they are just not educated. For example, when I preview a home for sale I have noticed missing smoke detectors, ones that are beeping and an inadequate supply installed within a home. The fact is that a missing or unconnected detector may just be needed to save your life someday. A single battery smoke detector not connected in line with all of the other detectors is merely useless as what happens if a fire occurs in another part of your home?

    The Solution

    Of course education, awareness and safe practices are key but according to the National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA), “Installing your smoke alarms correctly- and making sure they are in working order- is an important step in making your home and family safer from fire”. Listed below are just a few of the general recommendations by NFPA:

     

    • For the best protection, interconnect all smoke alarms. When one smoke alarm sounds they all sound. Interconnection can be done using hard-wiring or wireless technology.
    • When interconnected smoke alarms are installed, it is important that all of the alarms are from the same manufacturer. If the alarms are not compatible, they may not sound.
    • There are two types of smoke alarms – ionization and photoelectric. An ionization smoke alarm is generally more responsive to flaming fires, and a photoelectric smoke alarm is generally more responsive to smoldering fires. For the best protection, both types of alarms or combination ionization-photoelectric alarms, also known as dual sensor smoke alarms, are recommended.
    • Choose smoke alarms that have the label of a recognized testing laboratory.
    • Install smoke alarms inside each bedroom, outside each sleeping area and on every level of the home, including the basement.
    • On levels without bedrooms, install alarms in the living room (or den or family room) or near the stairway to the upper level, or in both locations.
    • Smoke alarms installed in the basement should be installed on the ceiling at the bottom of the stairs leading to the next level.
    • Smoke alarms should be installed at least 10 feet (3 meters) from a cooking appliance to minimize false alarms when cooking.
    • Mount smoke alarms high on walls or ceilings (remember, smoke rises). Wall-mounted alarms should be installed not more than 12 inches away from the ceiling (to the top of the alarm).
    • If you have ceilings that are pitched, install the alarm within 3 feet of the peak but not within the apex of the peak (four inches down from the peak).

     

    Needless to say, disregarding general fire safety recommendations and in many cases, township and local code could cause a loss of life and valuable property. You should also have an organized plan to evacuate your home if a fire occurs. According to NFPA, everyone should have a plan including an escape route, have a meeting place outside and practice the plan! They also advise that your children and other residents should know the plan well if you are not around or in case you are injured. Of course, call 911 as soon as possible! Always remember, “Safety First”!  Being proactive in terms of fire safety should be of utmost important to every homeowner. A building can be replaced but a life cannot!

    Learn as much as you can about fire safety as there are many resources to increase your education and knowledge!

    Frank Dolski   MBA, ABR, e-PRO
    Associate Broker
    Certified Relocation Specialist
    Previews Luxury Home Specialist
    Coldwell Banker Hearthside Realtors
    Ranked #1 In The State of PA in 2012
    For Coldwell Banker International Affiliated Realtors

    2012 Coldwell Banker International President’s Elite Award
    2010-2011 Coldwell Banker International President’s Circle Award
    215-803-3237 (mobile)
    215-794-1070 x-103
    f.dolski@cbhearthside.com
    www.FrankDolski.Com

  • Fire Safety! How Safe Is Your Home?

    Posted Under: Crime & Safety in Philadelphia, Home Buying in Philadelphia, Home Ownership in Philadelphia  |  October 14, 2014 4:50 AM  |  277 views  |  No comments

    My Name is Frank Dolski, Associate Broker with Coldwell Banker Hearthside Realtors in Lahaska, PA.  I represent buyers and sellers of Real Estate in Bucks, Montgomery, Lehigh, Philadelphia and the Chester County Area in Pennsylvania.  Towns like Doylestown, Buckingham, Yardley, Newtown, New HopeJamison

    North Wales and Langhorne are only a few of the areas where I represent clients.  One thing for sure, is that I meet many new people some first time home buyers as well as seasoned buyers and I learn new information regarding home ownership each and every day.

    So how safe is your home from a fire? Do you have adequate protection and do you have an evacuation plan in case of a fire?

    Smoke Detectors

    Smoke detectors are one of the things that I have seen homebuyers take for granted or in many cases, they are just not educated. For example, when I preview a home for sale I have noticed missing smoke detectors, ones that are beeping and an inadequate supply installed within a home. The fact is that a missing or unconnected detector may just be needed to save your life someday. A single battery smoke detector not connected in line with all of the other detectors is merely useless as what happens if a fire occurs in another part of your home?

    The Solution

    Of course education, awareness and safe practices are key but according to the National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA), “Installing your smoke alarms correctly- and making sure they are in working order- is an important step in making your home and family safer from fire”. Listed below are just a few of the general recommendations by NFPA:

     

    • For the best protection, interconnect all smoke alarms. When one smoke alarm sounds they all sound. Interconnection can be done using hard-wiring or wireless technology.
    • When interconnected smoke alarms are installed, it is important that all of the alarms are from the same manufacturer. If the alarms are not compatible, they may not sound.
    • There are two types of smoke alarms – ionization and photoelectric. An ionization smoke alarm is generally more responsive to flaming fires, and a photoelectric smoke alarm is generally more responsive to smoldering fires. For the best protection, both types of alarms or combination ionization-photoelectric alarms, also known as dual sensor smoke alarms, are recommended.
    • Choose smoke alarms that have the label of a recognized testing laboratory.
    • Install smoke alarms inside each bedroom, outside each sleeping area and on every level of the home, including the basement.
    • On levels without bedrooms, install alarms in the living room (or den or family room) or near the stairway to the upper level, or in both locations.
    • Smoke alarms installed in the basement should be installed on the ceiling at the bottom of the stairs leading to the next level.
    • Smoke alarms should be installed at least 10 feet (3 meters) from a cooking appliance to minimize false alarms when cooking.
    • Mount smoke alarms high on walls or ceilings (remember, smoke rises). Wall-mounted alarms should be installed not more than 12 inches away from the ceiling (to the top of the alarm).
    • If you have ceilings that are pitched, install the alarm within 3 feet of the peak but not within the apex of the peak (four inches down from the peak).

     

    Needless to say, disregarding general fire safety recommendations and in many cases, township and local code could cause a loss of life and valuable property. You should also have an organized plan to evacuate your home if a fire occurs. According to NFPA, everyone should have a plan including an escape route, have a meeting place outside and practice the plan! They also advise that your children and other residents should know the plan well if you are not around or in case you are injured. Of course, call 911 as soon as possible! Always remember, “Safety First”!  Being proactive in terms of fire safety should be of utmost important to every homeowner. A building can be replaced but a life cannot!

    Learn as much as you can about fire safety as there are many resources to increase your education and knowledge!

    Frank Dolski   MBA, ABR, e-PRO
    Associate Broker
    Certified Relocation Specialist
    Previews Luxury Home Specialist
    Coldwell Banker Hearthside Realtors
    Ranked #1 In The State of PA in 2012
    For Coldwell Banker International Affiliated Realtors

    2012 Coldwell Banker International President’s Elite Award
    2010-2011 Coldwell Banker International President’s Circle Award
    215-803-3237 (mobile)
    215-794-1070 x-103
    f.dolski@cbhearthside.com
    www.FrankDolski.Com

  • Fire Safety! How Safe Is Your Home?

    Posted Under: Crime & Safety in Chester County, Home Buying in Chester County, Home Ownership in Chester County  |  October 14, 2014 4:48 AM  |  276 views  |  No comments

    My Name is Frank Dolski, Associate Broker with Coldwell Banker Hearthside Realtors in Lahaska, PA.  I represent buyers and sellers of Real Estate in Bucks, Montgomery, Lehigh, Philadelphia and the Chester County Area in Pennsylvania.  Towns like Doylestown, Buckingham, Yardley, Newtown, New HopeJamison

    North Wales and Langhorne are only a few of the areas where I represent clients.  One thing for sure, is that I meet many new people some first time home buyers as well as seasoned buyers and I learn new information regarding home ownership each and every day.

    So how safe is your home from a fire? Do you have adequate protection and do you have an evacuation plan in case of a fire?

    Smoke Detectors

    Smoke detectors are one of the things that I have seen homebuyers take for granted or in many cases, they are just not educated. For example, when I preview a home for sale I have noticed missing smoke detectors, ones that are beeping and an inadequate supply installed within a home. The fact is that a missing or unconnected detector may just be needed to save your life someday. A single battery smoke detector not connected in line with all of the other detectors is merely useless as what happens if a fire occurs in another part of your home?

    The Solution

    Of course education, awareness and safe practices are key but according to the National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA), “Installing your smoke alarms correctly- and making sure they are in working order- is an important step in making your home and family safer from fire”. Listed below are just a few of the general recommendations by NFPA:

     

    • For the best protection, interconnect all smoke alarms. When one smoke alarm sounds they all sound. Interconnection can be done using hard-wiring or wireless technology.
    • When interconnected smoke alarms are installed, it is important that all of the alarms are from the same manufacturer. If the alarms are not compatible, they may not sound.
    • There are two types of smoke alarms – ionization and photoelectric. An ionization smoke alarm is generally more responsive to flaming fires, and a photoelectric smoke alarm is generally more responsive to smoldering fires. For the best protection, both types of alarms or combination ionization-photoelectric alarms, also known as dual sensor smoke alarms, are recommended.
    • Choose smoke alarms that have the label of a recognized testing laboratory.
    • Install smoke alarms inside each bedroom, outside each sleeping area and on every level of the home, including the basement.
    • On levels without bedrooms, install alarms in the living room (or den or family room) or near the stairway to the upper level, or in both locations.
    • Smoke alarms installed in the basement should be installed on the ceiling at the bottom of the stairs leading to the next level.
    • Smoke alarms should be installed at least 10 feet (3 meters) from a cooking appliance to minimize false alarms when cooking.
    • Mount smoke alarms high on walls or ceilings (remember, smoke rises). Wall-mounted alarms should be installed not more than 12 inches away from the ceiling (to the top of the alarm).
    • If you have ceilings that are pitched, install the alarm within 3 feet of the peak but not within the apex of the peak (four inches down from the peak).

     

    Needless to say, disregarding general fire safety recommendations and in many cases, township and local code could cause a loss of life and valuable property. You should also have an organized plan to evacuate your home if a fire occurs. According to NFPA, everyone should have a plan including an escape route, have a meeting place outside and practice the plan! They also advise that your children and other residents should know the plan well if you are not around or in case you are injured. Of course, call 911 as soon as possible! Always remember, “Safety First”!  Being proactive in terms of fire safety should be of utmost important to every homeowner. A building can be replaced but a life cannot!

    Learn as much as you can about fire safety as there are many resources to increase your education and knowledge!

    Frank Dolski   MBA, ABR, e-PRO
    Associate Broker
    Certified Relocation Specialist
    Previews Luxury Home Specialist
    Coldwell Banker Hearthside Realtors
    Ranked #1 In The State of PA in 2012
    For Coldwell Banker International Affiliated Realtors

    2012 Coldwell Banker International President’s Elite Award
    2010-2011 Coldwell Banker International President’s Circle Award
    215-803-3237 (mobile)
    215-794-1070 x-103
    f.dolski@cbhearthside.com
    www.FrankDolski.Com

  • Fire Safety! How Safe Is Your Home?

    Posted Under: Crime & Safety in Warminster, Home Buying in Warminster, Home Ownership in Warminster  |  October 14, 2014 4:47 AM  |  278 views  |  No comments

    My Name is Frank Dolski, Associate Broker with Coldwell Banker Hearthside Realtors in Lahaska, PA.  I represent buyers and sellers of Real Estate in Bucks, Montgomery, Lehigh, Philadelphia and the Chester County Area in Pennsylvania.  Towns like Doylestown, Buckingham, Yardley, Newtown, New HopeJamison

    North Wales and Langhorne are only a few of the areas where I represent clients.  One thing for sure, is that I meet many new people some first time home buyers as well as seasoned buyers and I learn new information regarding home ownership each and every day.

    So how safe is your home from a fire? Do you have adequate protection and do you have an evacuation plan in case of a fire?

    Smoke Detectors

    Smoke detectors are one of the things that I have seen homebuyers take for granted or in many cases, they are just not educated. For example, when I preview a home for sale I have noticed missing smoke detectors, ones that are beeping and an inadequate supply installed within a home. The fact is that a missing or unconnected detector may just be needed to save your life someday. A single battery smoke detector not connected in line with all of the other detectors is merely useless as what happens if a fire occurs in another part of your home?

    The Solution

    Of course education, awareness and safe practices are key but according to the National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA), “Installing your smoke alarms correctly- and making sure they are in working order- is an important step in making your home and family safer from fire”. Listed below are just a few of the general recommendations by NFPA:

     

    • For the best protection, interconnect all smoke alarms. When one smoke alarm sounds they all sound. Interconnection can be done using hard-wiring or wireless technology.
    • When interconnected smoke alarms are installed, it is important that all of the alarms are from the same manufacturer. If the alarms are not compatible, they may not sound.
    • There are two types of smoke alarms – ionization and photoelectric. An ionization smoke alarm is generally more responsive to flaming fires, and a photoelectric smoke alarm is generally more responsive to smoldering fires. For the best protection, both types of alarms or combination ionization-photoelectric alarms, also known as dual sensor smoke alarms, are recommended.
    • Choose smoke alarms that have the label of a recognized testing laboratory.
    • Install smoke alarms inside each bedroom, outside each sleeping area and on every level of the home, including the basement.
    • On levels without bedrooms, install alarms in the living room (or den or family room) or near the stairway to the upper level, or in both locations.
    • Smoke alarms installed in the basement should be installed on the ceiling at the bottom of the stairs leading to the next level.
    • Smoke alarms should be installed at least 10 feet (3 meters) from a cooking appliance to minimize false alarms when cooking.
    • Mount smoke alarms high on walls or ceilings (remember, smoke rises). Wall-mounted alarms should be installed not more than 12 inches away from the ceiling (to the top of the alarm).
    • If you have ceilings that are pitched, install the alarm within 3 feet of the peak but not within the apex of the peak (four inches down from the peak).

     

    Needless to say, disregarding general fire safety recommendations and in many cases, township and local code could cause a loss of life and valuable property. You should also have an organized plan to evacuate your home if a fire occurs. According to NFPA, everyone should have a plan including an escape route, have a meeting place outside and practice the plan! They also advise that your children and other residents should know the plan well if you are not around or in case you are injured. Of course, call 911 as soon as possible! Always remember, “Safety First”!  Being proactive in terms of fire safety should be of utmost important to every homeowner. A building can be replaced but a life cannot!

    Learn as much as you can about fire safety as there are many resources to increase your education and knowledge!

    Frank Dolski   MBA, ABR, e-PRO
    Associate Broker
    Certified Relocation Specialist
    Previews Luxury Home Specialist
    Coldwell Banker Hearthside Realtors
    Ranked #1 In The State of PA in 2012
    For Coldwell Banker International Affiliated Realtors

    2012 Coldwell Banker International President’s Elite Award
    2010-2011 Coldwell Banker International President’s Circle Award
    215-803-3237 (mobile)
    215-794-1070 x-103
    f.dolski@cbhearthside.com
    www.FrankDolski.Com

  • Fire Safety! How Safe Is Your Home?

    Posted Under: Crime & Safety in Chalfont, Home Buying in Chalfont, Home Ownership in Chalfont  |  October 14, 2014 4:46 AM  |  277 views  |  No comments

    My Name is Frank Dolski, Associate Broker with Coldwell Banker Hearthside Realtors in Lahaska, PA.  I represent buyers and sellers of Real Estate in Bucks, Montgomery, Lehigh, Philadelphia and the Chester County Area in Pennsylvania.  Towns like Doylestown, Buckingham, Yardley, Newtown, New HopeJamison

    North Wales and Langhorne are only a few of the areas where I represent clients.  One thing for sure, is that I meet many new people some first time home buyers as well as seasoned buyers and I learn new information regarding home ownership each and every day.

    So how safe is your home from a fire? Do you have adequate protection and do you have an evacuation plan in case of a fire?

    Smoke Detectors

    Smoke detectors are one of the things that I have seen homebuyers take for granted or in many cases, they are just not educated. For example, when I preview a home for sale I have noticed missing smoke detectors, ones that are beeping and an inadequate supply installed within a home. The fact is that a missing or unconnected detector may just be needed to save your life someday. A single battery smoke detector not connected in line with all of the other detectors is merely useless as what happens if a fire occurs in another part of your home?

    The Solution

    Of course education, awareness and safe practices are key but according to the National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA), “Installing your smoke alarms correctly- and making sure they are in working order- is an important step in making your home and family safer from fire”. Listed below are just a few of the general recommendations by NFPA:

     

    • For the best protection, interconnect all smoke alarms. When one smoke alarm sounds they all sound. Interconnection can be done using hard-wiring or wireless technology.
    • When interconnected smoke alarms are installed, it is important that all of the alarms are from the same manufacturer. If the alarms are not compatible, they may not sound.
    • There are two types of smoke alarms – ionization and photoelectric. An ionization smoke alarm is generally more responsive to flaming fires, and a photoelectric smoke alarm is generally more responsive to smoldering fires. For the best protection, both types of alarms or combination ionization-photoelectric alarms, also known as dual sensor smoke alarms, are recommended.
    • Choose smoke alarms that have the label of a recognized testing laboratory.
    • Install smoke alarms inside each bedroom, outside each sleeping area and on every level of the home, including the basement.
    • On levels without bedrooms, install alarms in the living room (or den or family room) or near the stairway to the upper level, or in both locations.
    • Smoke alarms installed in the basement should be installed on the ceiling at the bottom of the stairs leading to the next level.
    • Smoke alarms should be installed at least 10 feet (3 meters) from a cooking appliance to minimize false alarms when cooking.
    • Mount smoke alarms high on walls or ceilings (remember, smoke rises). Wall-mounted alarms should be installed not more than 12 inches away from the ceiling (to the top of the alarm).
    • If you have ceilings that are pitched, install the alarm within 3 feet of the peak but not within the apex of the peak (four inches down from the peak).

     

    Needless to say, disregarding general fire safety recommendations and in many cases, township and local code could cause a loss of life and valuable property. You should also have an organized plan to evacuate your home if a fire occurs. According to NFPA, everyone should have a plan including an escape route, have a meeting place outside and practice the plan! They also advise that your children and other residents should know the plan well if you are not around or in case you are injured. Of course, call 911 as soon as possible! Always remember, “Safety First”!  Being proactive in terms of fire safety should be of utmost important to every homeowner. A building can be replaced but a life cannot!

    Learn as much as you can about fire safety as there are many resources to increase your education and knowledge!

    Frank Dolski   MBA, ABR, e-PRO
    Associate Broker
    Certified Relocation Specialist
    Previews Luxury Home Specialist
    Coldwell Banker Hearthside Realtors
    Ranked #1 In The State of PA in 2012
    For Coldwell Banker International Affiliated Realtors

    2012 Coldwell Banker International President’s Elite Award
    2010-2011 Coldwell Banker International President’s Circle Award
    215-803-3237 (mobile)
    215-794-1070 x-103
    f.dolski@cbhearthside.com
    www.FrankDolski.Com

  • Fire Safety! How Safe Is Your Home?

    Posted Under: Crime & Safety in San Francisco, Home Buying in San Francisco, Home Ownership in San Francisco  |  October 14, 2014 4:44 AM  |  278 views  |  No comments

    My Name is Frank Dolski, Associate Broker with Coldwell Banker Hearthside Realtors in Lahaska, PA.  I represent buyers and sellers of Real Estate in Bucks, Montgomery, Lehigh, Philadelphia and the Chester County Area in Pennsylvania.  Towns like Doylestown, Buckingham, Yardley, Newtown, New HopeJamison

    North Wales and Langhorne are only a few of the areas where I represent clients.  One thing for sure, is that I meet many new people some first time home buyers as well as seasoned buyers and I learn new information regarding home ownership each and every day.

    So how safe is your home from a fire? Do you have adequate protection and do you have an evacuation plan in case of a fire?

    Smoke Detectors

    Smoke detectors are one of the things that I have seen homebuyers take for granted or in many cases, they are just not educated. For example, when I preview a home for sale I have noticed missing smoke detectors, ones that are beeping and an inadequate supply installed within a home. The fact is that a missing or unconnected detector may just be needed to save your life someday. A single battery smoke detector not connected in line with all of the other detectors is merely useless as what happens if a fire occurs in another part of your home?

    The Solution

    Of course education, awareness and safe practices are key but according to the National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA), “Installing your smoke alarms correctly- and making sure they are in working order- is an important step in making your home and family safer from fire”. Listed below are just a few of the general recommendations by NFPA:

     

    • For the best protection, interconnect all smoke alarms. When one smoke alarm sounds they all sound. Interconnection can be done using hard-wiring or wireless technology.
    • When interconnected smoke alarms are installed, it is important that all of the alarms are from the same manufacturer. If the alarms are not compatible, they may not sound.
    • There are two types of smoke alarms – ionization and photoelectric. An ionization smoke alarm is generally more responsive to flaming fires, and a photoelectric smoke alarm is generally more responsive to smoldering fires. For the best protection, both types of alarms or combination ionization-photoelectric alarms, also known as dual sensor smoke alarms, are recommended.
    • Choose smoke alarms that have the label of a recognized testing laboratory.
    • Install smoke alarms inside each bedroom, outside each sleeping area and on every level of the home, including the basement.
    • On levels without bedrooms, install alarms in the living room (or den or family room) or near the stairway to the upper level, or in both locations.
    • Smoke alarms installed in the basement should be installed on the ceiling at the bottom of the stairs leading to the next level.
    • Smoke alarms should be installed at least 10 feet (3 meters) from a cooking appliance to minimize false alarms when cooking.
    • Mount smoke alarms high on walls or ceilings (remember, smoke rises). Wall-mounted alarms should be installed not more than 12 inches away from the ceiling (to the top of the alarm).
    • If you have ceilings that are pitched, install the alarm within 3 feet of the peak but not within the apex of the peak (four inches down from the peak).

     

    Needless to say, disregarding general fire safety recommendations and in many cases, township and local code could cause a loss of life and valuable property. You should also have an organized plan to evacuate your home if a fire occurs. According to NFPA, everyone should have a plan including an escape route, have a meeting place outside and practice the plan! They also advise that your children and other residents should know the plan well if you are not around or in case you are injured. Of course, call 911 as soon as possible! Always remember, “Safety First”!  Being proactive in terms of fire safety should be of utmost important to every homeowner. A building can be replaced but a life cannot!

    Learn as much as you can about fire safety as there are many resources to increase your education and knowledge!

    Frank Dolski   MBA, ABR, e-PRO
    Associate Broker
    Certified Relocation Specialist
    Previews Luxury Home Specialist
    Coldwell Banker Hearthside Realtors
    Ranked #1 In The State of PA in 2012
    For Coldwell Banker International Affiliated Realtors

    2012 Coldwell Banker International President’s Elite Award
    2010-2011 Coldwell Banker International President’s Circle Award
    215-803-3237 (mobile)
    215-794-1070 x-103
    f.dolski@cbhearthside.com
    www.FrankDolski.Com

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